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ISBN:0520049217
Author: John H. Humphrey
ISBN13: 978-0520049215
Title: Roman Circuses: Arenas for Chariot Racing
Format: lit azw mbr txt
ePUB size: 1840 kb
FB2 size: 1603 kb
DJVU size: 1185 kb
Language: English
Category: Ancient Civilizations
Publisher: University of California Press; New Ed edition (February 13, 1986)
Pages: 703

Roman Circuses: Arenas for Chariot Racing by John H. Humphrey



It is the best-preserved chariot-racing circus and the first one described by . Humphrey in his Roman Circuses, Arenas for Chariot Racing. You are not watching a movie or reading a science fiction book. You are reading Humphrey's book. The book is close to 700 pages, scholastic in approach and tone but written in a readable prose that is easy for the reader to follow. Humphrey's book deserves the highest mark. If you are on this web page, aside from being lost, it must be because you are interested in ancient Rome. In that case, this book is an essential read for you. I strongly recommend it. Enjoy it and your imagination will soar. Roman Circuses, Arenas for Chariot Racing is prominently referenced by ww. portsInAntiquity.

52 bcl. Personal Name: Humphrey, John H. Publication, Distribution, et. Berkeley On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Roman circuses : arenas for chariot racing, John H. Humphrey.

Arenas for Chariot Racing. Pp. xiv + 703, 303 ills.

Roman chariot-racing was very popular, and many people bet money - gambled - on the races. They called their racetracks "circuses" because you go around them in a circle. People in ancient Rome loved to go to the circus. Good solid information from specialists, written for college students. Roman Circuses: Arenas for Chariot Racing, by John H. Humphrey (1986). Everything you could ever want to know about the racetracks, the seats, the starting gates, and the signals, based on archaeology. By an experienced excavation director, for specialists. Humor e irreverencia : Reinaldo Arenas.

Bibliography . Roman Circuses: Arenas for Chariot Racing. Bibliographical reference type: Book. Place of publication: Berkeley. Publisher: University of California Press. Year of publication: 1986.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Chariot racing (Greek: ἁρματοδρομία, translit. harmatodromia, Latin: ludi circenses) was one of the most popular Iranian, ancient Greek, Roman, and Byzantine sports. Chariot racing was dangerous to both drivers and horses as they often suffered serious injury and even death, but these dangers added to the excitement and interest for spectators. Chariot races could be watched by women, who were banned from watching many other sports. Humphrey, John H. (1986). Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California. ISBN 978-0-520-04921-5.

Xiv + 703 pp. with 323 illus. Imagine, you are watching a science fiction movie or perhaps reading a book about interstellar travel. The crew is from Earth. Their spaceship has landed near an ocean. The planet appears uninhabited. The crew begins to explore the surroundings. The soil is sandy and dry, void of any vegetation.

xiv + 703 pp. with 323 illus., 4to.
Reviews: 2
Zeks Horde
Imagine, you are watching a science fiction movie or perhaps reading a book about interstellar travel. The crew is from Earth. Their spaceship has landed near an ocean. The planet appears uninhabited. The crew begins to explore the surroundings. The soil is sandy and dry, void of any vegetation. A few miles away from the ocean, the wind uncovers a structure previously hidden by the sand. The structure appears ancient, left by a civilization long gone. Soon the space travelers will begin excavation to explore it. You are thrilled. It is a wondrous moment in the journey of your imagination.

The structure is a hippodrome located at Lepcis Magna, near the coast of Tripolitania in northern Libya. It is the best-preserved chariot-racing circus and the first one described by J.H.Humphrey in his Roman Circuses, Arenas for Chariot Racing.

You are not watching a movie or reading a science fiction book. You are reading Humphrey's book. By the time you are at chapter 2, you realize that centuries of technological progress hopelessly unobtainable in your lifetime are not required to experience the excitement that arises from uncovering unexplored and unknown planets. A distant world and a long lost civilization are here on our own planet waiting for you to explore.

Is that structure a racetrack? What races were run there? Why is the wall in the middle of the racetrack slightly off axis? Why is the arena not symmetrical, having a triumphal arch on one curved end and twelve small buildings on the other? Why twelve? What is their purpose? Why are they positioned in a slight arch?

In the search for answers, Humphrey leaves no mosaic tile unturned. All known archeological and literary sources about Roman circuses and chariot racing found throughout the Roman Empire are cited, described and examined. Three hundred and three figures and over thirteen hundred notes are included in the book. Their detailed description may challenge your interest. Hence, it is OK to skim a few chapters here and there. It is humanly impossible to retain in one's memory all the facts and the many minutiae that Humphrey references.

By connecting the dots between the hippodromes, mosaics, coins, sarcophagi, lamps, glass bowls and other artifacts, Humphrey uses his vast knowledge to paint the most complete picture ever produced of chariot racing. You will be amazed and surprised by the level of sophistication reached after centuries of racing.

If you are interested in ancient Rome and how the Romans lived, you cannot ignore the immense effect that chariot racing had on their lives, the involvement by practically the entire population of the Empire, the political implications of circus attendance and the astounding energy produced by the passion for the races.

After the circus at Lepcis Magna, Humphrey dedicates a considerable number of pages to the most famous arena, Circus Maximus from Rome. From there, the books comes back to North Africa and then moves to Spain, Northeastern and then Eastern provinces, other Italian circuses to end with arenas built in late antiquity. The book is close to 700 pages, scholastic in approach and tone but written in a readable prose that is easy for the reader to follow.

I do not assign five stars easily as attested by my other reviews posted here, on Amazon.com. Humphrey's book deserves the highest mark. If you are on this web page, aside from being lost, it must be because you are interested in ancient Rome. In that case, this book is an essential read for you. I strongly recommend it. Enjoy it and your imagination will soar.

Roman Circuses, Arenas for Chariot Racing is prominently referenced by www.SportsInAntiquity.com for a good reason.
Fog
This book contains more information than I ever knew could exist on the subject. Mr. Humphries has neatly organized a ton of facts about all known circuses, while focusing on the most popular, the Circus Maximus. His own excavating experience shows with his strong ability to interpret small pieces of ancient evidence that mere authors wouldn't be able to. I recommend this book as essential reading for anyone interested in the construction and evolution of these masterworks of ancient engineering. (5/5 stars)