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ISBN:0806131683
Author: Gaylen D. Lee
ISBN13: 978-0806131689
Title: Walking Where We Lived: Memoirs of a Mono Indian Family
Format: mbr rtf doc lrf
ePUB size: 1540 kb
FB2 size: 1496 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (September 15, 1999)
Pages: 224

Walking Where We Lived: Memoirs of a Mono Indian Family by Gaylen D. Lee



Walking Where We Lived" offers a view from the other side. It is not surprising for a man in Gaylen Lee's situation to be angry, and anger surfaces occasionally in his book. The region surrounding his life-long home place was once traversed freely by his ancestors. Now the land is fenced off and paved over. Animals which once lived with and helped sustain the people are seldom seen.

Lee, Gaylen D. (Gaylen Dennis), 1949-. Publication, Distribution, et. Norman On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Walking where we lived : memoirs of a Mono Indian family, by Gaylen D. Lee ; foreword by Mark Q. Sutton.

Gaylen D. Lee. The Nim (North Fork Mono) Indians have lived for centuries in a remote region of California’s Sierra Nevada. In this memoir, Gaylen D. Lee recounts the story of his Nim family across six generations. In keeping with the Nim’s traditional life-style, Lee’s memoir takes us through their annual seasonal cycle.

Where We A. Walking The Indian Streets. We Have Always Lived in the Castle. This Is Where We Live. Where We Do Our Work.

The North Fork Mono tribe are Western Mono Indians, whose traditional homeland is in the southern Sierra Nevada foothills of California. Their oral history is included in Mono traditional narratives. The tribe's 1996 Constitution allows open enrollment to eligible lineal descendants of the Northfork Mono  . Book: Walking Where We Lived: Memoirs of a Mono Indian Family by Gaylen D. Coordinates: 37°13′17″N 119°28′28″W, 3. 2139°N 11. 7444°W, 3. 2139; -119.

Walking Where We Lived: Memories of a Mono Indian Family. Gaylen D. Les Field.

The first book, Walking Where We Lived, is a wonderful, enjoyable read, full of knowledge and wisdom.

Book: Walking Where We Lived: Memoirs of a Mono Indian Family by Gaylen D. The Fort Bidwell Indian Community of the Fort Bidwell Reservation of California is a federally recognized tribe of Northern Paiute Indians in Modoc County in the northeast corner of California. Background - The population as of 1969 was 112. The agency is the Northern California agency.

com web site on Gaylon Lee’s book: “Non-Indians reading "Walking. Walking Where We Lived : Memoirs of a Mono Indian Family (98. The Nim (North Fork Mono) Indians have lived for centuries in a remote region of California’s Sierra Nevada. His photo images have appeared in Audubon and Mono Lake

The Nim (North Fork Mono) Indians have lived for centuries in a remote region of California’s Sierra Nevada. In this memoir, Gaylen D. Lee recounts the story of his Nim family across six generations. Drawing from the recollections of his grandparents, mother, and other relatives, Lee provides a deeply personal account of his people’s history and culture.

In keeping with the Nim’s traditional life-style, Lee’s memoir takes us through their annual seasonal cycle. He describes communal activities, such as food gathering, hunting and fishing, the processing of acorn (the Nim’s staple food), basketmaking, and ceremonies and games. Family photographs, some dating to the beginning of this century, enliven Lee’s descriptions.

Woven into the seasonal account is the disturbing story of Hispanic and white encroachment into the Nim world. Lee shows how the Mexican presence in the early nineteenth century, the Gold Rush, the Protestant conversion movement, and, more recently, the establishment of a national forest on traditional land have contributed to the erosion of Nim culture.

Walking Where We Lived is a bittersweet chronicle, revealing the persecution and hardships suffered by the Nim, but emphasizing their survival. Although many young Nim have little knowledge of the old ways and although the Nim are a minority in the land of their ancestors, the words of Lee’s grandmother remain a source of strength: "Ashupá. Don’t worry. It’s okay."

Reviews: 7
Eta
. Many books such as this are all about "what Grandfather told me", and while interesting, leaves you wondering how good Grandfathers memory was. While there is some of that in this book, in many cases the author researched the incidents he writes about, and through journals and official documents, proves that they were true. Author says he started this book for his children, so they would know their history, and expanded it into something all should read.
Akinonris
Great Book
Ffrlel
A wonderfully RICH read for anyone interested in the day to day life, history, and more importantly, perspectives from a CA Native American family (all sadly lacking in my California classroom education experience.)
Original
Great history of the Mono Indian Tribe.
Mr.Bean
Galen Lee writes an excellent book about growing up as a California Indian. He lives in today's society and yet honors his past. It is well worth reading.
Nettale
Good job Gaylen
Velan
I found this in my father's library while visiting his house in Mariposa, near Yosemite. It's an evocative and enlightening book which tells, in alternate chapters, the history of the Nim*, who are California Indians from the area I was staying in, and the personal history and experiences of the author, who grew up practicing many of their traditional ways. The non-historical chapters are arranged by seasons, beginning with spring and ending when winter begins to warm into another spring.

Lee's style is alternately scholarly, poetic, personal, and frank. He wrote this, the first personal account of the Nim by a Nim, partly because the existing written material on them, compiled by white anthropologists, was misleading or outright wrong. Some information is left out because it's "none of anybody's business;" other material, mostly involving the medicinal or food use of local plants, is deliberately vague to prevent foolish and inexperienced people from accidentally killing themselves.

The history is the usual tale of stolen land and broken treaties, attempted cultural genocide and fighting back. (One of the lighter bits quotes John Muir's horror at the incredible filthiness of some Indians he encounters while hiking in the woods; Lee points out that they were in a mosquito-infested area, and the Indians had sensibly covered themselves with a natural repellent - mud!) The personal narrative is written in a more intimate voice, sometimes earthy, sometimes funny, often moving. Lee's love for his family shines through every page.

I liked this a lot, and I think anyone who likes memoirs or nature writing would enjoy it. If you have a particular interest in California history or California Indian culture, it ought to be essential reading.

*The I in Nim has a diacritical I can't reproduce, but is pronounced like the u in put. Also, Lee explains that while the Nim and the Mono speak the same language and so have been lumped together by anthropologists, they do not consider themselves to be the same people. So the subtitle is a bit odd. Possibly it was added by the publisher.
Much has been written about Native Californians, but this book comes to us from a Nim (West Mono) writer who actually grew up in the old ways as taught to him by his people. It would be difficult to think of the indigenous Californians as "primitive" after reading this book. Their remarkably intricate crafts, legends, hunting and fishing techniques, and ceremonies make a single weave that endured for millennia--and that still endure, though tattered, in spite of a century of colonialism and genocide.

This book also dispels the dual urge to romanticize Native people and to see them as passive victims of whites. Lee reveals only those stories and ceremonial details already in print, keeping the rest private to avoid their exploitation. His people defended themselves with some success and resisted colonization even while adapting to it without losing their essence as a people.