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ISBN:0252024516
Author: William E. Van Vugt
ISBN13: 978-0252024511
Title: Britain to America: Mid-Nineteenth-Century Immigrants to the United States (Statue of Liberty Ellis Island)
Format: txt lrf docx lrf
ePUB size: 1887 kb
FB2 size: 1859 kb
DJVU size: 1229 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Illinois Press (April 1, 1999)
Pages: 241

Britain to America: Mid-Nineteenth-Century Immigrants to the United States (Statue of Liberty Ellis Island) by William E. Van Vugt



Britain to America : ry Immigrants to the United States. by William E. Van Vugt. From 1820 to 1860 the United States and Great Britain were the two most closely interconnected countries in the world in terms of culture and economic growth.

From 1820 to 1860 the United States and Great Britain were the two most closely interconnected countries in the world in terms of culture and economic growth.

VAN VUGT, William E. Britain to America: Mid-Nineteenth Century Immigrants to the United States. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999. HINTE, Jacob van. Netherlanders in America: A Study of Emigration and Settlement in the Ninteenth and Twentieth Centuries in the United States of America. Baker Book House, 1985.

Author: William E. Britain to America: ry Immigrants to the United States. and women who came to the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century, and some of their Welsh and Scottish fellow migrants. As one must when dealing with British immigrants, Van Vugt generated new information to fill the gaps left by official sources. He culled a ten percent sample of ships' passenger lists for the year 1851 from five leading . Van Vugt is absolutely right that determining the causes of emigration requires close examination of local circumstances. He goes farthest in this direction in his effort to prove that the counties most "distressed" by repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846 lost the most immigrants in the years 1847-1851. But his sources lend him weak support.

The War of 1812 between the United States and Britain slowed immigration even further. With peace re-established in 1814, immigration from Great Britain, Ireland and Western Europe resumed at a record pace. Major port cities of this era - New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Charleston - were overwhelmed with newcomers, many of them sick or dying from the long journey. One immigrant recalled arriving at Ellis Island: "The boat anchored at mid-bay and then they tendered us on the ship to Ellis Islan. e got off the boa. ou got your bag in your hand and went right into the building. Ah, that day must have been about five to six thousand people. Jammed, I remember it was August. Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty need your support. Donate now to help preserve the islands for future generations.

Doctors would observe immigrants as they climbed the stairs from the baggage area to the Great Hall. Doctors would observe immigrants as they climbed the stairs from the baggage area to the Great Hall. Immigrants behavior would be studied for difficulties in getting up the staircase. Worldwide, the Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable symbols of the United States as a symbol of freedom and democracy. The statue was disassembled into 350 pieces and shipped in 214 crates to the United States. The statue was put in storage while the pedestal was being completed.

These poignant early 20th century photos of Ellis Island immigrants convey the hope and hardship of starting a new life in the United States. An immigrant family on Ellis Island looks out across New York Harbor at the Statue of Liberty. 2 of 45. An Italian immigrant woman and her three children on their way to join the family patriarch in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Lewis W. Hine/Museum of the City of New York/Getty Images. 3 of 45. A young Russian Jewish immigrant. Hine/Stringer/Getty Images.

America's official immigration center from 1892 to 1954, Ellis Island welcomed over 12 million immigrants to New York. From 1892 to 1954, over 12 million immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. The Naming of Ellis Island: In the early 17th century, Ellis Island was no more than a small 2-3 acre lump of land in the Hudson River, just south of Manhattan. The Mohegan Indian tribe who inhabited the nearby shores called the island Kioshk, or Gull Island. In 1628 a Dutch man, Michael Paauw, acquired the island and renamed it Oyster Island for its rich.