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ISBN:1400167949
Author: John Pruden,Robert Gandt
ISBN13: 978-1400167944
Title: The Twilight Warriors: The Deadliest Naval Battle of World War II and the Men Who Fought It
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ePUB size: 1788 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (November 17, 2010)

The Twilight Warriors: The Deadliest Naval Battle of World War II and the Men Who Fought It by John Pruden,Robert Gandt



Corporate Name: United States. Navy History World War, 1939-1945. Corporate Name: United States. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The twilight warriors : the deadliest naval battle of World War II and the men who fought it, Robert Gandt.

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Author: Robert Gandt. Wilson's Creek: The Second Battle of the Civil War and the Men Who Fought It (Civil War America). The Twilight Warriors.

The Twilight Warriors book. Most had flown two combat missions that day. Images of flak bursts and targets viewed through gun sights and the dry-mouthed anxiety of nearly empty fuel tanks were still fresh in their minds. Even in normal times, the two groups maintained a cordial distance. Black shoes made no secret of their belief that they were the only real Navy men aboard the ship. They alone understood the crafts of ship handling, gunnery, navigation, damage control. Without them, the carrier was nothing more than an immobile barge.

Robert Gandt, John Pruden (Narrator), "The Twilight Warriors: The Deadliest Naval Battle of World War II and the Men Who Fought It" ISBN: 1400117941, ASIN: B004BZL1K8 2010 kbps ~11:53:00 338 MB. April 1945. The end of World War II finally appears to be nearing. The Nazis are collapsing in Europe, and the Americans are vastly overpowering the Japanese in the Pacific  . Like the HBO series The Pacific, this book combines thrilling action with human stories of courage and sacrifice and triumph. It's Band of Brothers at sea and in the sky.

The Twilight Warriors, winner of the 2011 Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature, is the engrossing, page-turning saga of a tightly knit band of naval aviators who are thrust into the final and most brutal battle of the Pacific war: Okinawa. The Third Reich is collapsing in Europe, and the Americans are overpowering the once-mighty Japanese Empire in the Pacific.

The Twilight Warriors, winner of the 2011 Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature, is the engrossing, page-turning saga of a tightly knit band of naval aviators who are thrust into the final-and most brutal-battle of the Pacific war: Okinawa. For a group of young pilots trained in the twilight of the war, the greatest worry is that it will end before they have a chance to face the enemy.

THE TWILIGHT WARRIORS: The Deadliest Naval Battle of World War II and the Men Who Fought It. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Military historian and novelist Gandt (Black Star Rising, 2007, et. chronicles the epic Battle of Okinawa. In the spring of 1945, as the Red Army approached Berlin, a ferocious land, sea and air.

The end of World War II finally appears to be nearing. The Nazis are collapsing in Europe, and the Americans are vastly overpowering the Japanese in the Pacific None (Post)apocalyptic Action Adults Adventure Anthology Art Autobiography & Biographies Bestsellers Business Children Classic Computer Contemporary Crime Detective Doctor Who Documentary Education Fantasy Full Cast Gay General Fiction Historical Fiction History Horror Humor Lecture Lesbian LGBT Libertarian Literature LitRPG Military Misc.

April 1945. The end of World War II finally appears to be nearing. The Nazis are collapsing in Europe, and the Americans are vastly overpowering the Japanese in the Pacific. For a group of pilots in their early twenties who were trained during the twilight of the war, the biggest concern is that they'll never actually see real action and will go home without having a chance to face the enemy. They call themselves Tail-End Charlies. They fly at the tail end of formations, stand at the tail end of chow lines, and now they are prepared for battle at the tail end of the war. Little do they know that they will be key players in the most difficult and bloodiest of naval battles-not only of World War II but in all of American history: the campaign to take the Japanese island of Okinawa to serve as a basis for an eventual invasion of Japan.Derived from interviews with and newly discovered memoirs, journals, and correspondence of Okinawa veterans from both the American and Japanese sides, The Twilight Warriors provides a thrilling you-are-there narrative. Like the HBO series The Pacific, this book combines thrilling action with human stories of courage and sacrifice and triumph. It's Band of Brothers at sea and in the sky.
Reviews: 7
Dugor
Okay first off I need to say this, why the hell are there reviews for some Anthology about Game of Thrones all over this book? AMAZON!?!?!? Surely, all those honest reviewers talking about a completely different book with what I am sure is a different cover than this one about fighter pilots and the last battle of WW2 in the Pacific.

Okay that rant done. This book is about the battle for Okinawa. The author uses as a framing device the fighter pilots of VF-10 and VBF-10 on the USS Intrepid CV-11 to talk about this last battle. As well as talk about the fight the Allied Nation fleet had with the Kamikazes during the Battle for Okinawa. The title of the book relates to both these fighter pilots, some of whom are just now reaching operational units after being in training command for a couple of year and are the last warriors, twilight warriors, to go into battle; as well as the Japanese senior command who are fighting the last battles of their lives, again a twilight warrior situation. Most of the men that are featured in this book either fought some of the opening battles of the war, one of them was a PBY pilot that was in the Philippines at the start of the war, or they are brand new. So they don't have much combat experience and are just getting used to the fighting involved with this near the end of the war situation. On the flip side of this there are the Japanese and the desperation they have to try and stop the Allied nations. To which they have turned to the use of Kamikazes in both the air and the sea. While the land campaign the Japanese are shown to do a defense in depth and fight to the last man for every inch of the terrain.
So this should be an awesome book right, daring-do and heroic actions and amazing battle scenes right? Except at times the author gets lost in the description of people and the constant flipping back and forth from scenes that at times are occurring at the same time. For example the author talks of the sortie by the IJN's Yamato battleship and escorting ships. They are attacked by the carrier aircraft from the US Fleet. He spends two chapters talking about the various attack runs by the pilots and it isn't really in a timeline situation, rather he will talk all about the aircraft from one group. Then jump back in time to talk about another group making the same attack from a different angle. Then a little bit later he will jump around with the some of the stories from the Japanese survivors who talk about their experiences during the battle. Then although this is set up to be a book about the pilots and their kamikaze adversaries, this book also spends a good amount of time talking about the survival of the destroyers and other ships at the picket lines near the island as well as the land battle itself. In my mind it seemed as if the author couldn't get enough story to pad out this book so he turned around and added some additional information about the battle and the other ships involved in the area on or around Okinawa. I have read some of these same stories in other book on the battle or on specific units or ships, so in that sense for me this was a retread of older stories.
This was a good book, but not really an outstanding book in my mind. Probably a good place to start for those interested in the US Navy "Fleet that Came to Stay" and the battle for Okinawa.
Akinohn
By the spring of 1945, the Japanese had been driven west across the Pacific by the ever-increasing strength of the American Navy. Okinawa, only 350 miles from mainland Japan, was to be the final battle leading up to the invasion of Japan. Okinawa would serve as a major staging area as well as a base for aircraft. But before these preparations could be made, the Japanese garrison needed to be defeated. On April 1, 1945, the Americans stormed ashore. What laid ahead was the most costly naval battle of the war. Author Robert Gandt describes the naval aspect of the battle for Okinawa in "The Twilight Warriors".

I've read several books about the battle for Okinawa, and this one is unique from the previous ones I've read. This book focuses specifically on the naval aspect of the fighting, while only mentioning the land battle in broad terms. Gandt pays particular attention to the kamikaze attacks, the suicide mission of the battleship Yamato, and the numerous air battles that took place in the area. The pilots who flew the planes were called "Tail-End Charlies", due to their status as late-comers to the war. These men also flew at the back of formations, stood at the end of chow lines, and even had their own sleeping quarters called "boys' town".

Perhaps the area of greatest danger was the destroyer picket stations. These ships would intercept incoming kamikazes and radio ahead to the main fleet. The Japanese were soon setting out to destroy these ships, and many American destroyers were lost as a result of the kamikaze attacks.

I felt Gandt did an especially good job of describing the suicide mission of the Yamato. He devotes several chapters to this story, and I was amazed at the possibility of this ship actually reaching the beaches at Okinawa, beaching itself, and firing on the American soldiers and ships. Fortunately, the "Tail-End Charlies" and other flyers sank the ship before it was too late.

This is a fine work of World War II history. The writing is very good, and Gandt has done a thorough job of researching the aspects of the battle. Highly recommended.
Ranterl
This book has basically what is to me the right balance of grand strategy and individual human stories. For one thing it has a fair number of Japanese stories and, like the American side, gets into the divisions within the Japanese military.

I could have used a little more on the psychology of the individual kamikaze flyer. Although the author seems pretty responsible about handling the Japanese angle, this specific aspect - I mean regarding individual young men - is presented kind of monochromatically. His treatment of the disagreements among their superiors seems more realistic. I don't know if there is a lot of material on the younger flyers. That's the missing piece for this otherwise nicely balanced account. It's noticeable because of (1) the well-written accounts of American flyers and (2) the fact, as he shows, that we sometimes know the names of the kamikaze pilots.

The kamikaze affair is a strange business that could have used a little more examination, especially given its importance to Okinawa specifically.

The author pulls no punches in describing what are essentially, I think, war crimes: that is, some American pilots shooting at Japanese pilots who are down in the water. This is good to describe, but the author would have done well to dwell on that. It's handled rather dismissively here.

Finally, there is some really informative stuff on the land battle.

A mixed book in some ways but very readable.