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ISBN:1595584773
Author: Dave Zirin
ISBN13: 978-1595584779
Title: People's History of Sports in the United States: 250 Years of Politics, Protest, People, and Play (New Press People's History)
Format: doc lrf lit azw
ePUB size: 1849 kb
FB2 size: 1458 kb
DJVU size: 1531 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: The New Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2009)
Pages: 320

People's History of Sports in the United States: 250 Years of Politics, Protest, People, and Play (New Press People's History) by Dave Zirin



People's History of Sport. has been added to your Cart. The most satisfying sections of A People's History of Sports remind us of such brave moments, and of the courage of Paul Robeson, who was persecuted by the House Un-American Activities Committee, and of Jackie Robinson, who, at Branch Rickey's urging, initially repudiated and attacked Robeson, but then grew wiser regarding "America's destructiveness As someone who has studied the politics of sports in the past, I was still able to learn a lot from this book. Zirin uncovers many underrecognized figures and events and sheds light on their role within the larger context of the time.

The New Press people's history series. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -292) and index. Formatted Contents Note: Until the twentieth century Rough riding Sports and leisure No depression War and its discontents Have we gone soft? Sports on the edge of panic The flood gates The 1980s : welcome to hell . More of the same versus change. Uniform Title: New Press people's history. Rubrics: Sports Political aspects United States History Social aspects. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Publisher: The New Press. In this long-awaited book from the rising superstar of sportswriting, whose blog The Edge of Sports is read each week by thousands of people across the country, Dave Zirin offers a riotously entertaining chronicle of larger-than-life sporting characters and dramatic contests and what amounts to an alternative history of the United States as seen through the games its people played. Through Zirin’s eyes, sports are never mere games, but a reflection of-and spur toward-the political conflicts that shape American society.

A People’s historical past of activities within the United States is replete with surprises for professional activities enthusiasts, whereas an individual drawn to heritage might be surprised via the connections Zirin attracts among politics and dad flies. As Jeff Chang, writer of Can’t cease Won’t Stop, places it, After you learn him, you’ll by no means see activities an analogous approach again.

But truly doing justice to a people's history of sports in the US would take much more than 300 pages. but I'll still take Zirin's columns over this book any da. .Nov 28, 2008 Shana rated it it was amazing. Americans do not live or work in a vacuum, and this book reminds us that we do not play in a vacuum either. After an overview of sports in early world history, Zirin focuses each chapter on a particular time in twentieth and twenty-first century America. Social and political movements like civil rights and Communism; issues like class, racism, sexism, doping, and sports economics; and the continuing interplay between sports, war, and discontent are woven throughout. Women play an ambiguous role in the book, but remain relatively marginal – which in a sense is a fair reflection of the world of sport.

My only gripe with the book is that I wish it were 150 pages longer, with more in-depth analysis of the events described. Nonetheless, this is a compelling read.

New Press People's History. References to this work on external resources. LibraryThing members' description. Dave Zirin offers a chronicle of larger-than-life sporting characters and dramatic contests, sketching an alternative history of the United States as seen through the games its people played.

From the author Robert Lipsyte calls “the best young sportswriter in America,” a rollicking, rebellious, myth-busting history of sports in America that puts politics in the ring with pop cultureIn this long-waited book from the rising superstar of sportswriting, whose blog Edge of Sports is read each week by thousands of people across the country, Dave Zirin offers a riotously entertaining chronicle of larger-than-life sporting characters and dramatic contests and what amounts to an alternative history of the United States as seen through the games its people played. Through Zirin’s eyes, sports are never mere games, but a reflection of—and spur toward—the political conflicts that shape American society.

Half a century before Jackie Robinson was born, the black ballplayer Moses Fleetwood Walker brandished a revolver to keep racist fans at bay, then took his regular place in the lineup. In the midst of the Depression, when almost no black athletes were allowed on the U.S. Olympic team, athletes held a Counter Olympics where a third of the participants were African American.

A People’s History of Sports in the United States is replete with surprises for seasoned sports fans, while anyone interested in history will be amazed by the connections Zirin draws between politics and pop flies. As Jeff Chang, author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, puts it, “After you read him, you’ll never see sports the same way again.”

Reviews: 7
Ucantia
As someone who has studied the politics of sports in the past, I was still able to learn a lot from this book. Zirin uncovers many underrecognized figures and events and sheds light on their role within the larger context of the time. Like other reviewers, there were a few things in the last couple chapters about the 1990s and 2000s that made me raise an eyebrow because he gave them greater importance than I'm aware of them really having or focused on less significant aspects - the one that stands out is focusing on the Williams sisters' dad rather than their own groundbreaking roles in tennis. Other than that, the structure of the book is straight-forward and Zirin's writing is distilled and easy, though obviously left-leaning.
Gnng
Zirin is a compelling writer and does an effective job bringing to life the often tenuous yet important intersection of sports and politics. In addition to outlining this history, he does an astute job profiling activist athletes including stars such as Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ashe, Martina Navratilova and lesser known yet courageous athletes such as Abdul-Raouf and Craig Hodges. This is a must read for sports fans, social justice activists and anyone interested in history of sports and politics in the U.S.
Kalv
I have long appreciated Howard Zinn's People's History of the United States since I was first exposed to it. I have also been an avid reader of Dave Zirin's columns and books, with its emphasis on sports and politics in America. Unfortunately, there is little relationship between the concept of a "people's history" and Zirin's account of sports. Moreover, while this is something of a history it is overwhelmingly focused on the post-World War II intersection of sports and politics, with something about class warfare but never quite enough. He emphasizes the 1960s and 1970s and discusses the icons of the era such as Muhammad Ali, Bill Russell, and John Carlos and Tommie Smith.

At some level this is more of a counter narrative to the dominant reverence for sports and sporting figures in the United States. It takes aims at the ruling elite in sports and their shortsightedness. There is quite a lot about labor relations, race relations, and other assorted divisive issues. This is a relatively straightforward short introduction to the subject, but there is little here that gets below a surface discussion. There is considerable overlap with what is contained in this book and what Zirin has to say about these same subjects in other books that he has written, especially "Bad Sports" (2010) and "Welcome to the Terrordome" (2007).

This book is interesting, and certainly worth reading, but there are other issues that deserve serious consideration not covered here in any appropriate manner. These include subjects of class, ethnic identity, immigration, and the like. There is also considerably more to be delved into concerning the race and labor issues that Zirin does explore. As it is, this book is a useful introduction to a counter history of sports in America.
Dont_Wory
Zirin is the greatest sports writer of all time!!!
Akinonris
to be enjoyed
Delari
very fascinating book.
Unnis
Great read
Dave Zirin always provides an interesting take on sports in America, and this book is no exception. I especially liked his chapters on the early years of baseball in America.