» » The Real All Americans: The Team that Changed a Game, a People, a Nation
Download The Real All Americans: The Team that Changed a Game, a People, a Nation epub book
ISBN:0739343343
Author: David Pittu,Sally Jenkins
ISBN13: 978-0739343340
Title: The Real All Americans: The Team that Changed a Game, a People, a Nation
Format: docx mobi mbr doc
ePUB size: 1122 kb
FB2 size: 1631 kb
DJVU size: 1671 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (May 8, 2007)

The Real All Americans: The Team that Changed a Game, a People, a Nation by David Pittu,Sally Jenkins



Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Sally Jenkins, bestselling co-author of It's Not About the Bike, revives a forgotten piece of history in The Real All Americans. In doing so, she has crafted a truly inspirational story about a Native American football team that is as much about football as Lance Armstrong's book was about a bike. If you’d guess that Yale or Harvard ruled the college gridiron in 1911 and 1912, you’d be wrong. Its story begins with Lt. Col.

The real field Pratt Fort Marion : first lessons Carlisle The last fight and first games Cheats and swindles Not a parlor game Dodges and deceptions Experiments in flight Advances and retreats The real all Americans. Corporate Name: United States Indian School (Carlisle, P. Football. Download The real all Americans : the team that changed a game, a people, a nation Sally Jenkins. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Aurignacian culture.

team (the Indians, natch), which defied tradition and arguably did more to shape the modern collegiate game than any of its Ivy League competitors. Founded in 1879 by Army Lt. Richard Pratt, an abolitionist who believed Native Americans deserved a visible place in . society, Carlisle introduced fans and opponents to shoulder pads, the forward pass and the reverse option. The team soon had one of the most famous athletes in American history, Jim Thorpe. Jenkins does an excellent job of providing a mini-biography of Thorpe in this book and what he meant to the school. Thorpe was a somewhat eccentric, fun loving, even lazy character but his athletic prowess was amazing. Jenkins does an fantastic job of exploring Thorpe and the way Pop Warner got the best out of him, most of the time.

In doing so, she has crafted a truly inspirational story about a Native American football team that is as much about football as Lance Armstrong's book was about a bike. If you’d guess that Yale or Harvard ruled the college gridiron in 1911 and 19 Sally Jenkins, bestselling co-author of It's Not About the Bike, revives a forgotten piece of history in The Real All Americans. In doing so, she has crafted a truly inspirational story about a Native American football team that is as much about football as Lance Armstrong's book was about a bike

In her new book, Jenkins resurrects the football teams of the Carlisle School in Pennsylvania, where for a decade or so, its squads played and defeated some of the country's top collegiate teams. If nothing else, she has rescued from obscurity a man who in the 19th century believed in equality of all races, . Glenn "Pop" Warner becomes head coach; Thorpe learns the game; the poet Marianne Moore teaches at the school; President Theodore Roosevelt invites the team to the White House. In a pivotal game against West Point, Thorpe squares off against Dwight Eisenhower, who played linebacker. Robinson and Branch Rickey's experiment to integrate baseball - and thereby society - started the process of equality, and while it has not taken hold, is at least making inroads.

Sally Jenkins (born October 22, 1960) is an American sports columnist and feature writer for The Washington Post. She was previously a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life won the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award in 2000. It was also number one on the New York Times Best Seller list. This book was also awarded the Christopher Award for Adult Books in 2001. It also appeared in the Texas Tayshas Reading List from 2001. The Real All Americans: The Team That Changed a Game, a People, a Nation.

THE REAL ALL AMERICANS The Team that Changed a Game, a People, a Nation. by Sally Jenkins Read by David Pittu. Most sports fans will recall the name of Jim Thorpe, the Native American athlete who won the decathlon Gold Medal in the 1912 Olympics. Fewer will remember his exploits as a college football player. And fewer yet will recall his school, Carlisle, which was a boarding school for Native Americans. The school was an attempt to make Native Americans more like white Americans. David Pittu offers a solid reading, combining a fan's excitement with an appropriate level of reserve. The abridgment is generally smooth, but there are points where listeners are set up for a deeper discussion and the topic abruptly changes.

Sally Jenkins' "The Real All Americans" is by turns fascinating, entertaining, and moving. A long forgotten but important slice of American history comes alive in Sally Jennings new book. com User, July 3, 2007. The Team That Invented Modern Day Football. com User, June 12, 2007. If you are a student of Indian culture and the game of football, you are in for the treat of your life. Sally Jenkins has given the reader an engrossing overlay of a school that attempted a social experiment of indoctrination and assimilation of displaced Western American Indians into a predominately white man's state of refinement. Though only partially successful in forcibly educating children of notable relocated tribes

Sally Jenkins's The Real All Americans is a fascinating history of the . The book describes the origins and development of Carlisle football through the lens of important individuals at the school, particularly founder and first director Brigadier General Richard Henry Pratt, coach Glenn "Pop" Warner, and an assortment of students and players, including Delos Lone Wolf, Bemus Pierce, Albert Exendine, Gus Welch, and the legendary Jim Thorpe

Read E-book The Book on Investing in Real Estate with No (and Low) Money Down: Real Life Strategies for Investing in Real Estate Using Other People s Money - Brandon Turner PDF Free Download. Read Aloud The Jossey-Bass Reader on Nonprofit and Public Leadership - Jossey-Bass Publishers PDF Free Download. Read Aloud Comfortably Numb: How Psychiatry Is Medicating a Nation - Charles Barber. Read Aloud Ten Child-Centered Forensic Family Evaluation Tools: An Empirically Annotated User s Guide - Benjamin D Garber. Read Aloud Anti-Inflammatory Oxygen Therapy: Your Complete Guide to Understanding and Using Natural Oxygen Therapy - Mark Sircus PDF Free Download.

Sally Jenkins, bestselling co-author of It's Not About the Bike, revives a forgotten piece of history in The Real All Americans. In doing so, she has crafted a truly inspirational story about a Native American football team that is as much about football as Lance Armstrong's book was about a bike.If you’d guess that Yale or Harvard ruled the college gridiron in 1911 and 1912, you’d be wrong. The most popular team belonged to an institution called the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Its story begins with Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt, a fierce abolitionist who believed that Native Americans deserved a place in American society. In 1879, Pratt made a treacherous journey to the Dakota Territory to recruit Carlisle’s first students. Years later, three students approached Pratt with the notion of forming a football team. Pratt liked the idea, and in less than twenty years the Carlisle football team was defeating their Ivy League opponents and in the process changing the way the game was played. Sally Jenkins gives this story of unlikely champions a breathtaking immediacy. We see the legendary Jim Thorpe kicking a winning field goal, watch an injured Dwight D. Eisenhower limping off the field, and follow the glorious rise of Coach Glenn “Pop” Warner as well as his unexpected fall from grace. The Real All Americans is about the end of a culture and the birth of a game that has thrilled Americans for generations. It is an inspiring reminder of the extraordinary things that can be achieved when we set aside our differences and embrace a common purpose.
Reviews: 7
Bandiri
Sally Jenkins has produced a very informative read and I found the football part of the story quite enjoyable. The story begins with Pop Warner giving a rare pep talk before the historic 1912 Carlisle / Army football match. But before the reader enters the stadium with Jim Thorpe and the rest of the Carlisle team the author takes us back in time to the 1860s. That is because this book is about much more than that well known game. As the subtitle says, this story is about the team, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School football team. Not just one team. It traces the short 39 year history of the Indian School and its love affair with the game of American football.

Intercollegiate football began at Carlisle in 1893 and ended in 1917. Pop Warner was the coach from 1899 through 1903 and again from 1907 through 1914. The author does a great job of covering Warner’s unparalleled contribution to the development of football from the brutal slugfest of its origins to the introduction of the passing game. She covers the various pieces of practice equipment invented by Pop and his wild idea for the hidden ball play. But, for me, the best part was the story of the introduction of the forward pass to Carlisle in 1907 and the way the Native American players excelled at incorporating it into the game.

But Jenkins’ book is about much more than football at Carlisle. It traces the story of Carlisle’s founder Richard Henry Pratt and introduces the reader to the significant Native American leaders who were instrumental to the success of the Indian school. I think she does a good job of highlighting the positive as well as the considerable negative effects that all the Indian schools had on the Native American’s who were forced to attend, including Carlisle. She also does not shy away from the questionable behavior and actions of Pop Warner as well. Warner knew Thorpe played baseball for pay before Warner began to encourage him to try-out for the Olympics.

I found this to be a very exciting and captivating story that was, in the end, so much more than just a story about Native Americans playing football.
catterpillar
This is an outstanding book about the Carlisle football team of the early 1900's, principally because it describes the history of Richard Henry Pratt and his "experiment" with prisoners at Fort Marion, Florida, that led up to his founding and building of the Carlisle Indian School in 1879. While the author (Jenkins) accepted the faulty narrative that Pratt's design for Carlisle was to destroy Indian languages, cultures and children, she was generally accurate in describing the educational development of Carlisle under Pratt's leadership and the deterioration of education after Pratt was removed in 1904. Jenkins acknowledged the crucial role of Albert Exendine, a Delaware Indian student at Carlisle who mentored Jim Thorpe and was instrumental in the success of the Carlisle football team. Exendine was born in Indian Territory (now Bartlesville, Oklahoma) and preceded Thorpe at Carlisle four years earlier. He was the first Indian to complete a law degree at Dickinson College (in Carlisle) and became a successful football coach and Indian activist who believed that the removal of Pratt and the closing of Carlisle (1918) "set Indian education back 100 years." (pg. 306). Scholars of the history of Indian education have badly missed Pratt's legacy at Carlisle, and Jenkins' book gives a reasonably balanced story for readers to decide.
Undeyn
First off--it's not a football book. It certainly covers football--which can be interesting--but maybe that's 20% of the book. Most of it is a great book on the challenges of the Carlisle School and the Native American community post Civil War until around 1920. I get that's a harder way to market a book, but either way, it's well worth reading.
Ionzar
I was so delighted to see Sally Jenkins on Cspan Book TV talking about her book and immediately ordered several copies. It is an excellent historical account of the Native American athletes educated at Carlisle Indian School and reveals much about the aftermath of the colonization of the U.S. Superintendent Pratt was a quintessential colonial master who inspired some of his students to excel beyond their wildest dreams. It affords a probing look in to that era, an era not usually described in the general history of the U.S. Jim Thorpe was probably the best known athlete of his time and after winning many awards he was disgraced and only many years after his death was his family able to recover some of his reputation.

The book offers insights into class and race of that time and of the present. Athletic ability & brilliance can provide a way out of poverty but the colonial masters still control the game.