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ISBN:0864735790
Author: Matthew S. R. Palmer
ISBN13: 978-0864735799
Title: The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand's Law and Constitution
Format: lrf mobi docx txt
ePUB size: 1561 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Victoria University Press (April 1, 2009)
Pages: 360

The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand's Law and Constitution by Matthew S. R. Palmer



Personal Name: Palmer, Matthew, 1964-. Publication, Distribution, et. Wellington . Victoria University Press, (c)2008. Includes bibliographical references (p. 452-464) and index. Uniform Title: Treaty of Waitangi (1840). Rubrics: Maori (New Zealand people) Legal status, laws, etc Land tenure Government relations Constitutional law New Zealand.

Yet the specific meaning of the Treaty in relation to particular issues depends on context and therefore remains uncertain. This uncertainty is exacerbated by what I find to be the incoherent legal status and inconsistent legal force of the Treaty of Waitangi. The Treaty of Waitangi, and it principles, should be interpreted broadly, generously and practically, in new and changing circumstances as they arise; As an agreement upholding the Crown’s legitimacy, in governing New Zealand for the benefit of all New Zealanders, in exchange for the Crown’s active protection of rangatiratanga, or authority of hapu, iwi and Māori generally to use and control their own interests

The Treaty of Waitangi, signed by Maori and by the British Crown in 1840, is the founding document of New Zealand. The Treaty should be given legal force, as judged independently by a new Treaty of Waitangi Court. Keywords: Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand, indigenous. The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand's Law and Constitution (2008). THE TREATY OF WAITANGI IN NEW ZEALAND'S LAW AND CONSTITUTION, Victoria University Press

He is the coauthor of Bridled Power. Paperback: 360 pages. Publisher: Victoria University Press (April 1, 2009).

Matthew Palmer concludes that the time has come to stabilise the place of the Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand’s constitution and law. He is concerned that the uncertainty about who should resolve the uncertainties of the Treaty’s meaning could engender knee-jerk reactions to particular issues that could irretrievably damage the relationships between the Crown, Maori and other New Zealanders  . Current stock: 0. Qty

Matthew Simon Russell Palmer, QC (born 12 May 1964) is a New Zealand judge, legal academic and former public servant. Palmer graduated with a BA in Economics & Political Science from University of Canterbury in 1983. This was followed by a LLB (Hons) (First Class) in 1987. Then a LLM & JSD from Yale Law School in 1993.

Dr Matthew Palmer considers the contemporary meaning of the Treaty of Waitangi. But New Zealanders are a practical people and our constitution is quintessentially pragmatic. It seems to me that generations of legal scholars, with honourable exceptions such as Jock Brookfield, and certainly judges and law officers of the Crown, have averted their eyes from studying such matters too closely, perhaps in case they do not like what they find. But for practical purposes – and for the purposes of determining what the Treaty of Waitangi means today, I don’t think much needs to change. In my 2008 book on The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand’s Law and Constitution I detailed this process of the contemporary reinterpretation of the meaning of the Treaty of Waitangi. I outlined the key aspects of the resulting meaning of the Treaty that were contributed by each official institution.

03/Publication 112 288 SP9. Matthew S. R. Palmer, The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand’s Law and Constitution (2008), LC Call No. KUQ2565. Claudia Orange, The Treaty of Waitangi (rev ed. 2011).

The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand's Law and Constitution. Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

com Product Description (ISBN 0864735790, Paperback). Delving into an important constitutional issue, this thorough examination details the up-to-date legal arguments involved in the indigenous-rights debate around the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi

Delving into an important constitutional issue, this thorough examination details the up-to-date legal arguments involved in the indigenous-rights debate around the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi. Uniquely combining conceptual academic theory with grounded and realistic suggestions for improving the ways the New Zealand government deals with the Maori, this comprehensive account outlines the significance behind an unresolved controversy that affects New Zealand’s identity and culture, as well as their constitution, law, and economy.