» » Puritan's Empire
Download Puritan's Empire epub book
ISBN:0979160057
Author: Charles A Coulombe
ISBN13: 978-0979160059
Title: Puritan's Empire
Format: txt doc mobi azw
ePUB size: 1584 kb
FB2 size: 1601 kb
DJVU size: 1900 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Tumblar House (September 9, 2008)
Pages: 624

Puritan's Empire by Charles A Coulombe



Paul said: In my opinion, the best history book on American history. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Charles A. Coulombe.

In this book, Coulombe goes into a part of American history that most historians have either forgotten, ignored, or were never taught. Upon reading it, one can understand how America's full potential was sadly derailed from her original destiny.

Charles A. Coulombe (right) with a Croatian Monarchist holding a Croatian Royal flag. 2018, Charles A. Coulombe during a Great War commemoration in Zagreb, organized by Croatian monarchists and nobility. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Puritan's Empire, Tumblar House, 2008. Desire & Deception, Tumblar House, 2009. The White Cockade: Catholic Poetry and Verse, Tumblar House, 2009. Everyman Today Call Rome, Tumblar House, 2011.

Puritan’s Empire by Charles Coulombe. It is not easy to say exactly what this fascinating, powerful, rich and heartfelt epic panorama of a book is. For it is many different things at once. It is subtitled: A Catholic Perspective on American History. There is nothing covert about Coulombe! He is transparently an uncompromising Catholic traditionalist, drawing out the consequences of that position. Among those consequences is the recognition that Americans have been by and large conditioned by an ideology hostile to the doctrines of Catholicism – which moreover is embedded in a powerful ideological version of their history, spoon-fed to the young in what Americans call their public schools (State schools in the British Isles).

Puritan’s Empire by Charles A. Coulombe is a unique tour de force of American history from a Catholic high traditionalist perspective, spanning the colonial period to the modern day. Although some sections are dry, the colorful and controversial personal analysis undergirding the volume’s rationale will keep the reader intellectually engaged, regardless of whether or not he agrees with the author’s conclusions. Puritan’s Empire by Charles A. Mr. Coulombe conveys the notion of sacramental kingship within a Catholic society and the nuances of the class system from days of yore.

LibraryThing members' description. com Product Description (ISBN 0979160057, Hardcover). History is the key to understanding men-whether as nations, families, or individuals. For Catholics, history has an even higher purpose beside. For them, history is the unfolding of God's Will in time, and the attempts of men either to conform themselves to or to resist that Will. But American Catholic historians have generally refrained from exploring their own national history with these.

Puritan's Empire ~ Charles Coulombe. Next video playing soon MORE. Catholic Confederates 5:25 The Carroll Family 11:50 Declaration of Independence 15:49 Cultures of the North and South 24:18 A Case of American Revisionism? 33:04 The Southern Cross 35:22 Revolutionary War against Parliament 39:38 Why should Monarchists stay in the US? 46:20.

About Charles A. Author of the chart-climbing The Pope’s Legion, and Puritan’s Empire: A Catholic Perspective on American History, Coulombe is recognized internationally for his in-depth knowledge of Vatican politics and the influence of Catholicism in America and Europe. His audiences regularly range from graduate students at Oxford University, England to the New Mexico Military Institute, from which he graduated. Warren,’ she said, ‘he has come home to die: You needn’t be afraid he’ll leave you this time. ‘Home,’ he mocked gently.

History is the key to understanding men-whether as nations, families, or individuals. For Catholics, history has an even higher purpose beside. For them, history is the unfolding of God's Will in time, and the attempts of men either to conform themselves to or to resist that Will. But American Catholic historians have generally refrained from exploring their own national history with these principles, preferring instead to adopt the analysis of their non-Catholic colleagues, save when looking at purely Catholic topics (and sometimes not then). It is vital then, for Catholics, especially young Catholics, to have a good and proper understanding of their country's history. To exercise their patriotism, they must work for the conversion of the United States; to do this effectively, they must understand the forces and events which brought forth not only the religion of Americanism and the country itself, but also the sort of Catholicism which, in 300 years, failed so dismally to bring this conversion about. This book attempts to reinterpret the better known episodes of our history in accordance with the Faith, and to point up lesser-known details which will give factual proof of the truth of this reinterpretation.
Reviews: 7
skyjettttt
Puritan's Empire is essential reading for understanding what, exactly, the United States has done with its share of Christendom. In this book, Coulombe goes into a part of American history that most historians have either forgotten, ignored, or were never taught. Upon reading it, one can understand how America's full potential was sadly derailed from her original destiny.

Coulombe actually recognizes the American Revolution as America's First Civil War, spearheaded by a core of radical oligarchs, riotous urban mobs and looters, and a passive-but-compliant majority in the populace. Rather than being viewed as America's native defense against the foreign power of England, the First American Civil War is shown to actually be a struggle in which "brother fights brother, and no quarter is given."

In fact, the author goes further back showing that the European history of our land and people begin before 1776, and that this history involved the rule of monarchs. For not only were the colonies ruled by English kings--English rule being "no more foreign than the Federal government is in California today"--but the European settlers of these lands also originated with the Catholic monarchs of France and Spain, both powers being keenly interested in bringing the natives into the One True Faith.

Puritan treatment of American Indians and Catholics is starkly contrasted with that of the more benevolent French and Spanish. There is a more seamless integration of the latter two powers into the New World than the Puritans. And consequently there is a high amount of resentment towards Indians, the French, Spanish, blacks (treated better by the Catholic monarchies), English loyalists, and Catholics overall.

This Puritan bitterness contorted itself into a perennial backlash that has been a dark trait of the American psyche ever since. Coulombe traces this hostility through the draconian laws against early American Catholics, the violence of the Know-Nothings and the Ku-Klux-Klan, and the worldwide American drive to destroy monarchies and remnants of Christendom.

But this book is not the screed of an aggrieved class. There are plenty of moments where Catholics are shown as being culpable for their failure to evangelize and thrive in lands that held so much potential. Simply wanting a place at America's table, Catholics seemed to have regarded the U.S. as "perfect in their current religious and political condition." And so, not only is the tale of Catholics in America one of persecution and misfortune, but it is also the story of tragic lost opportunities, betraying elements of "cowardice and dereliction on the part of the country's Catholics."

Coulombe is one of the most important American authors we have. While many anti-Catholic Americans would disregard this historical account before ever picking up the book, an enormous amount of American Catholics, Europeans, and others around the world--thirsting for an explanation of America's current state--will undoubtedly cherish this rare volume. It goes without saying that this work should accompany any study of American history.

Coulombe has undertaken what few authors have, and whether or not he realized what he was doing, the result was to produce one of the most exceptional and relevant books produced in this century. My prediction is that its readership will grow exponentially in the fullness of time, the more that Western society loses its bearings.

For a follow-up encore to this incredible book, I highly recommend Coulombe's Star-Spangled Crown: A Simple Guide to the American Monarchy.

Star-Spangled Crown: A Simple Guide to the American Monarchy
Walan
I bought this book as the author is an avowed monarchist. I'm not a monarchist but had never even heard of such a person existing in the modern world. So I was interested in understanding his perspective and saw this book. As a lover of history and a proud catholic I thought, "Why not." However, I will admit that I wasn't expecting much. I thought it would be a really biased/bigoted perspective and I'd make it maybe a quarter to halfway through. Oh how wrong I was. I LOVED this book.

Most books like to belabor the point. So it takes 15 pages to say what could be said in 2. Mr. Coulombe does a great job of keeping moving; however, it comes at the expense that I was constantly coming across sections that I would think, "Is that true?" or "I want to look that up." But then you move onto the next subject and feel the same way. This book was soooo interesting as it was a different perspective on known events. As a proud catholic it was quite shocking to see how bigotted the US colonies/states were against Catholics. But it was also really interesting to see how many people were Catholic: the native Americans (including those in the trail of tears), possibly George Washington, Billie Holiday, etc.

He does a really good job of presenting an interesting perspective without being all pomp and cheerleading. It's obvious his biases so it's worth considering alternative sources but this book WILL inspire you to try and read more about these issues and understand the complexity that is American History.
Rasmus
Growing up, going to public schools and colleges, I always felt that history, as taught to me, always left out something important. Rather like a murder mystery leaving out a motive for the killer, American history tends to leave out the role faith and religion, and their adherents, have played, only casually mentioning such things as that the Pilgrims were Puritans or so-and-so were Congregationalists, without really giving us a sense of what that means in a way that conveys true understanding. Puritan's Empire does quite the opposite, and in so doing explains the whys and wherefores of people, places, and events that give us all a better sense of our country's true history, particularly from a Catholic perspective, which is almost unheard of in modern America. Charles Coulombe gives us a history of a crazy nation, where we conceal such craziness under a patina of respectability. Rather like story of a high-end bordello, that would rather think of itself in more lofty terms because of who it caters to, we are no different, except we rather call what we have a "republic."
Sti
This work is a must read for every American Catholic who desires to understand the relations between Catholics and non-Catholics in the U.S. Contained in this book are hundreds of pages of Catholic North American history that most have never read of or heard of and more history that many of us have some familiarity with only a very incomplete narrative and from a secular, protestant, or freemasonic perspective. I promise that your perspective of American history will be forever altered after you read this book.
Gietadia
Good overview of American history from Catholic perspective. When I read broad stroke history books I typically am happy when I am provided sources to dive deeper into specific periods. This work provided Botha good overview of the true American history and many sources to read.

One criticism - when setting up his interpretation of certain period he rambles a bit ...... but that is a common issue with all historical writings ..... as detail is needed but not always entertaining :)

Overall very good read especially for anyone wanting to see the TRUE AMERICAN history .........