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ISBN:0771015038
Author: George Blackburn
ISBN13: 978-0771015038
Title: The Guns of Normandy: A Soldier's Eye View, France 1944
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ePUB size: 1595 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; 1st edition (April 26, 1997)
Pages: 536

The Guns of Normandy: A Soldier's Eye View, France 1944 by George Blackburn



Personal Name: Blackburn, George . 1917-. Publication, Distribution, et. Toronto On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The guns of Normandy : a soldier's eye view, France 1944, George G. Blackburn.

The Guns of Normandy book. The story of this crucial battle opens in England, as the 4th Field Regiment receives news that something big is happening in France and that after long years of training they are finally going into action. The troop ships set out from besieged London and arrive at the D-Day beaches in the appalling aftermath of the landing.

The Guns of Normandy is no glorious adventure story. Once into the front lines, war is hell. Tension overlays every minute of every hour of every day for weeks on end. –Books in Canada. What a wonderful bit of eye-witness history Canadian author George Blackburn has rendered in his recent book, "The Guns Of Normandy: A Soldier's View, France 1944". Published on July 31, 2003.

The Guns of Normandy puts the reader in the front lines of this horrific battle. In the most graphic and authentic detail, it brings to life every aspect of a soldier’s existence, from the mortal terror of impending destruction, to the unending fatigue, to the giddy exhilaration at finding oneself still, inexplicably, alive.

The second book, THE GUNS OF NORMANDY, describes the 4th Field's actions in support of the 2nd Division in northern France from early July 1944 to its arrival at the Seine River in late August. As the Army brass plans the advance into the Reich, the author's vantage point becomes widely heralded as having the best view of the ground to be fought over, and to it, as if on pilgrimage, come the high and low, including L. Gen. Guy Simonds, Commander of 2nd Canadian Corps, and L. Brian Horrocks, Commander of British XXX Corps. But the interesting perception by Blackburn is the way the various officer ranks used battlefield maps.

The weapons of Normandy places the reader within the entrance strains of this awful conflict. within the such a lot picture and actual aspect, it brings to lifestyles each element of a soldier’s lifestyles, from the mortal terror of forthcoming destruction, to the endless fatigue, to the giddy pleasure at discovering oneself nonetheless, inexplicably, alive. The tale of this significant conflict opens in England, because the 4th box Regiment gets information that anything gigantic is going on in France and that when lengthy years of teaching they're eventually going into motion. To Lose a conflict: France 1940 is the ultimate e-book of Alistair Horne's trilogy, such as the autumn of Paris and the cost of Glory and tells the tale of the good crises of the competition among France and Germany. In 1940 Hitler despatched his troops to execute the autumn of France.

List of Edna Staebler Award recipients. a b Faculty of Arts, 1996, Edna Staebler Award, Wilfrid Laurier University, Past Winners, George G. Blackburn, Retrieved 11/21/2012.

Aerial view after bombardment of Vire 1944. US Troops Prepare to Move Inland from Normandy Beachhead. US Army Troops take bombed Carentan. George Blackburn – The Guns of Normandy: A Soldier’s Eye View, France 1944. John Buckley – British Armour in the Normandy Campaign. Carlo d’Este – Decision in Normandy: The Real Story of Montgomery and the Allied Campaign.

Blackburn wrote a trilogy of books based on his war-time experiences: The Guns of Normandy: A Soldier's Eye View, France 1944 The Guns of Victory: A Soldier's Eye View, Belgium, Holland, and Germany, 1944-45, and Where the Hell Are the Guns?: A Soldier's View of the Anxious Years, 1939–44. The Guns of Normandy received the "Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction" in 1996. He also received the French Legion of Honour in 2004 Légion d'honneur

George Blackburn in his book The Guns of Normandy tells the story of a German Colonel coming across the lines with a white flag saying that he and his men would surrender on the condition that he would be allowed to witness the Canadians’ machine gun artillery in action. Of course, the Canadians were only using the humble 25pdr and it was their doctrine/training that allowed such massive amounts of firepower to get down range.

In the weeks after D-Day, the level of artillery action in Normandy was unprecedented. In what was a relatively small area, both sides bombarded each other relentlessly for three months, each trying to overwhelm the other by sheer fire power.The Guns of Normandy puts the reader in the front lines of this horrific battle. In the most graphic and authentic detail, it brings to life every aspect of a soldier’s existence, from the mortal terror of impending destruction, to the unending fatigue, to the giddy exhilaration at finding oneself still, inexplicably, alive.The story of this crucial battle opens in England, as the 4th Field Regiment receives news that something big is happening in France and that after long years of training they are finally going into action. The troop ships set out from besieged London and arrive at the D-Day beaches in the appalling aftermath of the landing.What follows is the most harrowing and realistic account of what it is like to be in action, as the very lead man in the attack: an artillery observer calling in fire on enemy positions. The story unfolds in the present tense, giving the uncomfortably real sense that “You are here.”The conditions under which the troops had to exist were horrific. There was near-constant terror of being hit by incoming shells; prolonged lack of sleep; boredom; weakness from dysentery; sudden and gruesome deaths of close friends; and severe physical privation and mental anguish. And in the face of all this, men were called upon to perform heroic acts of bravery and they did. Blackburn provides genuine insight to the nature of military service for the average Canadian soldier in the Second World War – something that is all too often lacking in the accounts of armchair historians and television journalists. The result is a classic account of war at the sharp end.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews: 7
I'm a Russian Occupant
What a wonderful bit of eye-witness history Canadian author George Blackburn has rendered in his recent book, "The Guns Of Normandy: A Soldier's View, France 1944". This is an absorbing, entertaining, and fascinating account of a Canadian participant in the Allied invasion onto the beaches of Normandy in June of 1944, a wonderful second volume in his three-volume trilogy. His eye-witness testimony concerning his own anecdotal experience during the historic campaign marshals a marvelously captivating and insightful perspective on the nature of combat as he experienced it while on the line as the action transpired all along the front. Indeed, it is Blackburn's unique ability to speak in the first person that makes his contribution so compelling and valuable.
The author's stated purpose is to take the reader on an accompanied tour of the battle as it progresses and evolves, helping us to better empathize with and understand the horrific and riveting circumstances under which the situation progresses, as they struggle from the killing ground of the beaches up the escarpment to the fields and deadly hedges, and on into the lush green of the waiting countryside of France. What we are privileged to experience, as a result, is a full metal jacket approach to the chaos of war, amid the acrid smells, blinding flashes of light, and ear-pounding crashes of both incoming and outgoing shells exploding day and night. In doing so, Blackburn clears somewhat a path through the all too commonplace `fog of battle'.
Blackburn does so with a wonderfully literate and engagingly approachable writing style, and he sues his obvious facility with words to great advantage here, adding immeasurably to our understanding of what the experience on the ground was in those first fatal hours and days as the Allies bludgeoned their ways through the brutal resistance of a frenzied Nazi war machine. He writes with surprising intensity and emotion, and his sense of recall of particular events and existential circumstances for himself and his fellows is both impressive and quite moving at points in his narrative. This is first person history at its best, one that employs both a more objective coda to the book, which also serves to lend a more authoritative aura to the proceedings than would otherwise have been possible.

Blackburn's other volumes are interesting as well, and are similarly eyewitness accounts of this remarkable Canadian war hero turned historian and author's personal experience as a participant in the Mediterranean and European campaigns of the Second World War. Here he has shared with us his amazing, profound recollections of the men who fought so valiantly in France in 1944 in service to their countries. This is a story that should be told again and again, so we never forget what it took to take back the beaches, the surrounding countryside, all in preparation for moving on into the interior of France to push the Germans all the way back to Berlin. This was not only the longest day, but also one of the greatest days in history, when hundreds of thousands of Canadians, Brits, Australians, Frenchmen, and Americans strove out of their landing boats to set foot back on Europe, to take back by force of arms the liberty and freedom that had been wrested away from the mainland so cruelly nearly five years before. This, then, is the story of how that crusade to liberate Europe began, of its first shaky steps off the LSTs and boats onto the rocky bloodied shores of France. Enjoy!
Zololmaran
This is the story of barely two months of the eleven months of brutal combat seen by Canada's 4th Field artillery regiment, and of the infantry units 4th Field supported with astonishing firepower. After several years in England, 4th Field's combat role begins with the regiment's landing in Normandy twenty days after D-Day.
Canadian field artillery during WWII was the best in the world. The guns of every artillery unit in a given battlefield sector were laid out on a grid plan that allowed Forward Observation Officers to call in pinpoint fire from every other regiment as well as their own. The Germans, who considered their's the best, were astounded by the Canadians' ability to rain huge barrages down precisely on target. Post-war German accounts of the fighting here repeatedly mention the dreaded Canadian field artillery. When Canadian infantry companies were being overrun, they often took what cover they could find and called in artillery barrages on their own positions, catching the Germans out in the open and astounded that they would do it.
In some of the fiercest action of WWII the Canadian Army advanced only 30-some miles, but they slugged it out against some of Germany's toughest, most fanatical panzer divisions and battle-hardened infantry. Hitler had ordered them not to give up an inch of ground, and they tried desperately to obey. Nevertheless, the Canadian units drove them into the famous Falaise Pocket from which only remnants of crack German divisions escaped.
One reason why writings by men on these front lines is rare is that few lived to tell about it. Some of the Canadian outfits in this action suffered over 100% casualties. Some replacements who arrived at Blackburn's regiment one evening were wiped out the same night. It takes a man who was there to REALLY know what it's like to live in the same sopping-wet clothes, in mud-and-water-filled dugouts for weeks and weeks, rarely getting a warm meal, fighting today for ground they may have to give up tomorrow.
So much detail seeps from one's memory, and for those who try to keep notes, doing so is daunting in conditions where imagination is needed to even keep written target coordinates preserved long enough for them to be used by the gun crews. George Blackburn was a reporter before enlisting in the Canadian Army in 1939. He took notes during combat and somehow preserved them. And, he survived the war to use them. After the war he interviewed some of the men he writes about. He visited the battlefield almost thirty years later gathering more material. His life after the war included writing in several professional regimes. His skill at painting vivid recollections of minute-to-minute life on the battlefield is evident throughout this splendid work.
I like the author's way of arranging the book into short chapters, each of which is an episode in the whole campaign. I like his way of presenting his first-person narrative, using "you" for "I". It works very well: "For a moment your attention is drawn to an opening in the stone wall, where a giant German tank, which you believe is a Panther, points its long-barrelled gun right at you."
This book, and its companion "The Guns of Victory," (even better, if that's possible) are the best accounts of battlefield action I've read. Even that exemplary novelist and war historian Len Deighton, with his outstanding "Fighter" historical novel and "Bomber" true account (or was it the other way around?) doesn't measure up to this. Blackburn stands above Remarque ("All's Quiet on the Western Front") and Siegfried Knappe ("Soldat: Reflections of a German Soldier")
Detail -- vivid, essential detail - provides a crucial underpinning of the gripping narrative. 4th Field's training in England allowed us to appreciate its excellence on the battlefield. I was honored to meet some of the men, like that gallant and resourceful Capt. Bill Waddell, for just one. From the descriptions of the bombings of Canadian forces by American and RAF bombers I have gained a new understanding of how devastating saturation bombing really is. Geez! For men who are already at the ragged edge of human endurance to suffer bombing by friendly air forces ...
We think of war as being conducted by infantry and tanks and planes - and of course generals in their comfy commands back there. There are many more. I was pleased to learn about the vast support network behind the troops in the thick of it. The Canadians fired more rounds per gun per day in this campaign than has ever been fired before - more rounds overall than during the Normandy beachhead. How does the ammo - MOUNTAINS of ammo -- the fuel, the food, the medical help get to the front? How do they even know where the front is from one day to the next? (Some didn't, like that intrepid motorcycle messenger.) And, of course, who carries the casualties from the front, and the replacements for them? (The dead usually had to be left where they fell: the overpowering stench of thousands of dead Canadians and Germans is always there.)
Footnotes, not so many as to inundate us, appear on the page, not as endnotes which keep readers flipping back and forth. The book has a fine index.