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Download Connecticut in the American Civil War: Slavery, Sacrifice, and Survival (The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books) epub book
ISBN:0819571385
Author: Warshauer
ISBN13: 978-0819571380
Title: Connecticut in the American Civil War: Slavery, Sacrifice, and Survival (The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books)
Format: azw mbr docx lit
ePUB size: 1582 kb
FB2 size: 1729 kb
DJVU size: 1955 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press; 1st edition (April 4, 2011)
Pages: 328

Connecticut in the American Civil War: Slavery, Sacrifice, and Survival (The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books) by Warshauer



Series: The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books. I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the Civil War and particularly the role Connecticut played. 3 people found this helpful.

The Driftless Connecticut Series & Garnet Books)

Connecticut within the nation, 1776-1860 : slavery, race, and politics And the war came, 1860-61 A recognition of death, 1862 The union crucible, 1863 Expensive victory, 1864-65 Survival's memory, 1865-1965. Geographic Name: Connecticut History Civil War, 1861-1865. Geographic Name: United States History Civil War, 1861-1865. Uniform Title: Garnet books. Download Connecticut in the American Civil War : slavery, sacrifice, and survival Matthew Warshauer. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Arabs.

Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state's involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory.

The New England state of Connecticut played a relatively small, but important role in the American Civil War, providing arms, equipment, money, supplies, and manpower for the Union Army, as well as the Union Navy. Several Connecticut politicians played significant roles in the Federal government and helped shape its policies during the war and the subsequent Reconstruction.

This collection of nine original essays provides a rich new understanding of Connecticut’s vital role in the Civil War. The book’s nine chapters address an array of individual topics that together weave an intricate fabric depicting the state’s involvement in this tumultuous period of American history.

Connecticut has a remarkable Civil War history, and although it is a small state, it was in many ways instrumental to the Union’s survival. The history of that war surrounds Connecticut residents every day both in terms of its physical realities and in the lasting legacies of a complicated conflict that shook the nation between 1861 and 1865. Three officers of Company C, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, Fort Brady, Virginia 1864 – Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Matthew Warshauer, PhD, is a Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University. Connecticut in the American Civil War: Slavery, Sacrifice, and Survival. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2011.

Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state’s involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and after the war; Connecticut’s reaction to the firing on Fort Sumter; the dissent in the state over whether or not the sword and musket should be raised against the South; the raising of troops; the sacrifice of those who served on the front and at home; and the need for closure after the war. This book is a concise, amazing account of a complex and troubling war. No one interested in this period of American history can afford to miss reading this important contribution to our national and local stories.The paperback edition includes a reading guide, which is also available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/e-books/materials/warshauer_reading_guide.pdf
Reviews: 6
Lamranilv
Very precise history of Connecticut's participation and influence in the Civil War. Well written and easy to read. Straightened out many myths that current Yankees probably think are truths. There was slavery in CT and many didn't want it to be given up. Even after Abolition, many in CT did not want to give the negro the right to vote. This writing will teach you much of the truth about the war and the attitudes of those on the homefront.
Melipra
This book is without a doubt one of the best i ever read. I enjoy history a lot which is probably why i am a history major. Dr. Matthew Warshauer tells the story of what connecticut's involvement in the civil is. There is plenty of detail and evidence to back up his information
Roru
This book is an excellent source for learning how different politicians and people felt toward the pro/ and antislavery issue as a whole in regards to employment and "rites" held by the citizens of Connecticut in the mid 1800s. The book also shows how men were able to purchase waivers for military service. A shocking example of America's past.
Bynelad
This is an excellent book and I enjoyed reading how Connecticut and its residents reacted to slavery and the Civil War. It's well researched and written providing the reader with the pros and cons from all sides of the issues. I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the Civil War and particularly the role Connecticut played.
allegro
As is often said, all politics is local, which is, yet again, demonstrated by this book. Matthew Warshauer presents a detailed look at the evolving politics of Connecticut in supporting the goal of preserving the Union and ultimately embracing the imperatives of emancipation. Connecticut has been called a megatrends state that has always been a harbinger of national thinking and innovation. Certainly that was the case in all aspects of the Civil War. Connecticut was at the forefront of anti-slavery literature, the underground railroad, Free Soil politics, mounting a military response to disunion, militarization of the economy and industry, medical assistance for soldiers and veterans, and the slow recognition of the political, military, and moral imperative of emancipation. Warshauer tells the story from the perspective of Connecticut, its soldiers, its citizens (white, black, and Irish), and its politicians. If you are from Connecticut the book offers a new and surprising perspective of the Civil War and the State's role, as well as, the forgotten philosophical, moral and political conflicts. If you are not from Connecticut, the book equally reveals the evolving view of the North about the appropriate and necessary goals of the war. In that sense, Connecticut was certainly a microcosm of the turmoil that was so effectively controlled and harnessed by Lincoln to not only win the war but set the nation on the proper moral path towards equality for all. That path has proven to be a long and continuing journey, but through sacrifice and leadership Lincoln, and many in Connecticut, provided a true compass for the nation to follow. Warshauer tells that story well.
Dyni
Yes, slavery was the root cause of the civil war- but this does not mean that the war was a noble crusade on the part of the Union states to abolish slavery, or emancipate slaves in the rebel states, and it certainly does not mean that the Union states were willing to extend political or social equality to free blacks. Warshauer thoroughly examines this conundrum through a Nutmeg lens in "Connecticut in the American Civil War." He provides a succinct and readable overview of the coming of the war and the major military developments- but all events are linked, as one would expect from the title, to goings-on in Connecticut. The bitter- and sometimes violent- political divisions in Connecticut politics- belie the notion of a united home front, even in the quintessentially Yankee state. Even as Connecticut men eagerly enlisted to fight the war, and Connecticut industry provided invaluable material support for the Union war effort, there were deep and fundamental disagreements over the necessity and meaning of the war. These disagreements endured during the post-war period, as Connecticut continued to deny political equality to blacks, and in subsequent decades' commemoration and memorialization of the war.
There are lots of great anecdotes concerning the Constitution State and its denizens during the war, and the heroic exploits of Connecticut military units are aptly described. But the book is no mere collection of trivia- there's plenty here for all serious students of our nation's fiery crucible. I think even my colleagues south of the Mason-Dixon line will find it interesting - especially as it helps dispel the sanctimonious myth of the morally pure Yankee.
Warshauer doesn't offer any particularly unique insights into the causes or course of the conflict- relying heavily at times on David Blight and James McPherson. Also, I wish he had followed through on some tantalizing bits about curtailment of civil liberties during the war (fortunately, I've got Neely's book to fall back on). But these minor flaws don't detract from the book's real value, which is in demonstrating how major themes on the national stage played out at the local and state level. And, like any great work of history, it reminds us that things were rarely as simple as they are often made out to be. Overall, this concise, readable work is an important contribution to our understanding of the Civil War, and I urge those interested in the topic to consider it during the sesquicentennial commemorations.