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Download Vashon-Maury Island (Images of America) epub book
ISBN:0738574996
Author: Jean Cammon Findlay,Bruce Haulman
ISBN13: 978-0738574998
Title: Vashon-Maury Island (Images of America)
Format: doc mbr lrf txt
ePUB size: 1311 kb
FB2 size: 1887 kb
DJVU size: 1720 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing; First American Edition edition (July 11, 2011)
Pages: 128

Vashon-Maury Island (Images of America) by Jean Cammon Findlay,Bruce Haulman



Images of America: Washington). by. Bruce Haulman, Jean Cammon Findlay. Vashon-Maury Island lies between Seattle and Tacoma and is connected to the mainland by the Washington State Ferries. The bridge proposed in the 1950s and 1960s did not materialize, which helped retain the island's isolation and rural lifestyle. Like other Puget Sound islands, its original economy was based on logging, fishing, brick-making, and agriculture, especially its Vashon-Maury Island lies between Seattle and Tacoma and is connected to the.

Jean Cammon Findlay is the daughter, granddaughter, and niece of Puget Sound captains and engineers. Robin Paterson is the owner and captain of the Joe and collector of Mosquito Fleet photographs and ephemera. The images in Mosquito Fleet of South Puget Sound come from the many local historical societies in the south Sound as well as Paterson's personal collection. Series: Images of America. This item: The Mosquito Fleet of South Puget Sound (WA) (Images of America). Pages with related products.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Cecil Benthos' new book on lost mines and buried treasures on Vashon and Maury Islands is the first of its kind. It's a great local read, and it provides a lot to think about! You can curl up in the fire with this one, or send your kids off on a treasure hunt in the summertime.

Bruce Haulman, Jean Cammon Findlay. Like other Puget Sound islands, its original economy was based on logging, fishing, brick-making, and agriculture, especially its strawberries. Island industries included the largest dry dock on the West Coast, shipbuilding, and ski manufacturing

by Jean Cammon Findlay. Series: Images of America (Washington). Vashon (steamboat 1905). Vashon Navigation Company. Wollochet Bay. Zephyr (steamboat). LibraryThing members' description.

Vashon-Maury Island lies between Seattle and Tacoma and is connected to the mainland by the Washington State Ferries.

Vashon-Maury Island (Images of America) by Bruce Haulman and Jean Cammon Findlay (Jul 11, 2011). Vashon High: "Playing Hardball" by Allysha Hamber (Mar 8, 2011). Vashon Island's Agricultural Roots: Tales of the Tilth as Told by Island Farmers (Paperback) - Common by By (author) Pamela J Woodroffe (2002). Stoneshore: Life on Vashon Island 1924-1932 by Phoebe Calma (Aug 14, 2013). by Cecil Benthos Phd (Sep 29, 2010)

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NEW Vashon-Maury Island (Images of America) by Bruce Haulman. NEW Vashon-Maury Island Coloring Book: Local Scenes drawn by Mair Alight. NEW Stoneshore: Life on Vashon Island 1924-1932 by Phoebe Calma.

Books about Vashon-Maury Island - Historical Photos & Images of. Some 200 photos fill the 125-page book,. a requirement of Arcadia’s “Images of America” line of. John'S Island, SC (Images of America (Arcadia Publishing)): Connie “Images of America: Vashon-Maury Island,” published by. Date: 4/28/2010 Publisher: Arcadia Publishing SC. Vashon-Maury Island - Bruce Haulman, Jean Cammon Findlay - Google

Vashon-Maury Island lies between Seattle and Tacoma and is connected to the mainland by the Washington State Ferries. The bridge proposed in the 1950s and 1960s did not materialize, which helped retain the island’s isolation and rural lifestyle. Like other Puget Sound islands, its original economy was based on logging, fishing, brick-making, and agriculture, especially its strawberries. Island industries included the largest dry dock on the West Coast, shipbuilding, and ski manufacturing. Distinct from the other islands, Vashon-Maury is the only one whose major town is not on the water. Originally inhabited for thousands of years by the S’Homamish people, the island’s first white settler arrived in 1865. Today, 145 years later, the population is more than 11,000.
Reviews: 3
Viashal
All the books are great. The Vashon/Maury Island book is the most personal because I live there for four years in the late 50's. I was fascinated to see some of the history of the exact place on the island I lived.
JoJogar
This book presents an interesting history of Vashon Island in the State of Washington. Here are some interesting facts that this book mentions: In 1755, at the age of 13, James Vashon began his British naval services. James Vashon never personally saw the island that was named after him. Beginning in 1852, logging was a significant business on the island. The last logging of old-growth forests on the island ended in the late 1940’s. Vashon College opened on October 25, 1982. Vashon Hardware was launched in 1929. There is a chapter on the book about Modern Vashon 1980-2010. In that particular chapter, it was mentioned that there was nearly a 30% growth rate of the postwar decades through the 1980’s. However, the growth rate was slowed to less than 10% in the 1990’s.
Ielonere
Island historians present a new view of Vashon's past.
By LESLIE BROWN' Vashon-Maury Island Beachcomber Editor '
Vashon-Maury Island Beachcomber, Vol. 55 No. 28 July 13, 2011
Jul 12 2011, 11:20 AM * UPDATED

The first account of Vashon's colorful past since Oliver Van Olinda took pen to paper 80 years ago will be released to the public Thursday.
Bruce Haulman and Jean Cammon Findlay, Island historians with deep roots on Vashon, have written a fresh account of the Island's storied past, looking at everything from the glaciers that shaped Vashon to the Native people who first lived here to the way the arrival of Euro-Americans altered the landscape.
"Images of America: Vashon-Maury Island," published by Arcadia Publishing, is largely a photographic account of the Island. Some 200 photos fill the 125-page book, each with long, descriptive captions.
But the two historians have also structured their slim volume as a narrative that captures the trends and developments that have shaped the Island over the decades. Six chapters, each beginning with a short essay, depict the overarching trends of the last few centuries -- including "Settlement: 1865-1890," "Boom: 1890-1920" and "Postwar Growth: 1945-1980."
Haulman, a historian who just retired from Green River Community College, said he's been writing and thinking about Vashon's history for nearly two decades and had a conceptual framework in mind for how such a book should be structured.
"I believed it was important to get a modern reinterpretation of Vashon's history for Islanders and visitors," he said.
Van Olinda, a man of his time, was dismissive toward the Native Americans who still lived in beachfront settlements at the turn of the 20th century, when he wrote his "History of Vashon-Maury Island." Haulman and Findlay provide a fresh look at early Native life, noting in the first chapter, "Though one may think civilization began with European settlement, the Coast Salish S'Homamish occupied the island for at least 3,000 to 6,000 years."
Both Findlay and Haulman said they found certain aspects of Vashon's history particularly fascinating. Findlay, for instance, noted that Islanders upset over a private ferry line run by Capt. Alexander Peabody helped launch the state ferry system. Early on, she added, "Ferries were seen as a stop-gap until the bridges could be built. We came so close to being just another suburban community like Mercer Island."
Other trends became apparent. The Island has long struggled with the sustainability of its businesses, questioned growth and have felt at odds with King County and the state, Haulman said.
"The issues we're facing today are not radically different from those when Euro-Americans first came to the Island: Who are we as an Island and how are we going to develop?" Haulman said.
Both Haulman and Findlay liked building the book around photographs, a requirement of Arcadia's "Images of America" line of publications. But the approach also presented challenges. Certain watershed events, Haulman noted, weren't photographed -- such as the famous incident at the north-end ferry dock in 1948, when a group of Vashon vigilantes wouldn't let Peabody's private ferry moor as part of an ongoing protest over the shoddy service his line provided.
"There are holes," he said. "Photos depend on time and place and a photographer being there."
Particularly challenging, both authors noted, was the difficulty of finding photographs from the last 20 to 30 years. "When we got to the 1980s, the photographic record almost disappeared. People don't think of that as history," Haulman said.
As a result, Haulman hopes to begin "a day in the life of Vashon project" four times a year, when photographers and writers are dispatched for a day to record life on the Island.
Both Findlay and Haulman said it was a joy to work together, poring over photos, writing and editing each other's work and striving to create what Findlay called "one voice that comes from putting our two styles together."
Meanwhile, they said, they're looking forward to discussing the books at gatherings and events, where they can elaborate on Vashon's rich history.
"That's what we can bring up," Findlay said. "The untold stories behind the book."
A book launch party will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 14, at the Vashon-Maury Island Historical Museum. The authors will also be on hand to sign their book at the historical association's booth at the Strawberry Festival on Saturday. All proceeds from the sale of the book will go to Vashon's historical association.
Vashon-Maury Island Beachcomber Editor Leslie Brown can be reached at [email protected] or 206-463-9195.