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ISBN:0786470658
Author: Gene Fehler
ISBN13: 978-0786470655
Title: When Baseball Was Still King: Major League Players Remember the 1950s
Format: lrf azw txt lit
ePUB size: 1240 kb
FB2 size: 1866 kb
DJVU size: 1393 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: McFarland (June 25, 2012)
Pages: 280

When Baseball Was Still King: Major League Players Remember the 1950s by Gene Fehler



Baseball in the 1950s comes to life through the words of 92 players from the fifties. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Baseball in the 1950s comes to life through the words of 92 players from the fifties. Playe Baseball in the 1950s comes to life through the words of 92 players from the fifties. Regardless of stature, they all have wonderful stories to tell about big league life in the 1950s, high and low, and moments with other players. In their conversations with author Gene Fehler. Gene Fehler is the author of 12 books, including three poetry collections from McFarland. He still plays baseball with one of his grown sons in The Great American Pastime Baseball League in Simpsonville, South Carolina, trying to baffle hitters with his slow curve.

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Games were postponed across much of major league baseball when city after city erupted into anguished violence after the April 4, 1968, assassination of Marti. As neighborhoods burned, many black baseball players grew determined to find a constructive way to recognize the slain civil rights leader. MLK Day. Memphis Grizzlies honor civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr. with new Nike uniform. Martin Luther King Jr. led civil rights movement, but millions of everyday folks had to follow. Mike Conley and Elliot Perry commemorate MLK Day by visiting the Lorraine Motel. Martin Luther King J. Through The Years.

The Major League Baseball relocations of 1950s–1960s is the move of several Major League Baseball franchises to the Western and Southern United States. This was in stark contrast to the early years of modern baseball, when the American League intentionally put teams in National League cities to compete directly with those teams. Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, and St. Louis were two-team towns, while New York City had three

Jackie Robinson broke Major League baseball's color barrier in 1947, but in the past few years, the percentage of African-American players on the field has dipped to Civil Rights-era numbers. Major League player LaTroy Hawkins pointed out: In baseball, you need all of the equipment - glove, bat, spikes

Archival photos reveal several white baseball players kneeling during the national anthem in protest of the lynching of innocent negroes and Jim Crow laws. The practice was quickly ended when the players realized that most of their fans were either KKK members or sympathizers. Not until 1947 would the first black player even take part in major league baseball, when Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers. If white baseball players had been protesting on behalf of negroes back in 1936, the most obvious subject of protest would have been against the latter’s exclusion from the major leagues.

Roberts operated under different handicaps in the majors: First, in his haste to rebuild the miserable Pirates, Rickey rushed Roberts up from A-Ball, and he wasn’t ready. Second, he couldn’t see what he was doing. the effect that coping not just with baseball but the Jim Crow South might have had on their players. Thus was Hank Aaron sent to Jacksonville, Dick Allen to Little Rock, and so on. The resultant scars were real and lasting.

Baseball in the 1950s comes to life through the words of 92 players from the fifties. In their conversations with author Gene Fehler, they tell, in more than a thousand stories and comments, of memorable moments, their dealings with umpires and managers, injuries and trades that affected their careers, regrets and joys that still remain with them so many years later. Players spoken to include Hall of Famers, All Stars, journeymen, and a few who were in the big leagues for the proverbial cup of coffee. Regardless of stature, they all have wonderful stories to tell about big league life in the 1950s, high and low, and moments with other players.