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ISBN:029277723X
Author: Hugh W. Stephens
ISBN13: 978-0292777231
Title: The Texas City Disaster, 1947
Format: mbr lrf txt lrf
ePUB size: 1707 kb
FB2 size: 1907 kb
DJVU size: 1704 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Texas Press (January 1, 1997)
Pages: 159

The Texas City Disaster, 1947 by Hugh W. Stephens



This is a print-on-demand title. 159 pages 6 x 9 18 b&w photos, 4 maps. ISBN: 978-0-292-77723-1. Description: On April 16, 1947, a small fire broke out among bags of ammonium nitrate fertilizer in the hold of the ship Grandcamp as it lay docked at Texas City, Texas.

Stephens describes the two explosions and the heroic efforts of Southeast Texans to rescue survivors and cope with extensive property damage. I read this book for a class and it was quite interesting. In 1947, two ships docked at Texas City near Galveston exploded because the potential hazard of ammonium nitrate wasn't understood. Five hundred people perished and thousands were injured.

history, and one of history's largest non-nuclear explosions

The Texas City Disaster,. has been added to your Cart. How sad that the lessons from Texas City, Texas, were not known nor remembered by those people in West, Texas on April 17, 2013, the exact same day of the month of April in 1947 when the second ship, High Flyer, moored at the Texas City dock exploded. Although the death toll in West is fortunately relatively low, the preamble to the explosion and the pictures of the destruction are frightening similar.

This book is a good source of information about the Texas City Disaster. I felt that the author was very factual about the events. However, I also felt that he seemed to concentrate on all the mistakes. This is a very good book for reference. It is not weighted down with a lot sensationalism. If you are unfamiliar with the tragedy, Hugh Stevens does a great job of walking you through the events leading up to the initial explosion of the Grandcamp and the subsequent explosion of the High Flyer.

Publisher: University of Texas Press. The Texas City Disaster, 1947.

The SS Grandcamp, carrying ammonium nitrate, caught fire early in the morning and exploded, wiping out the entire dock area, a nearby chemical plant, small businesses, grain warehouses, and many oil and chemical storage tanks. Flying debris ignited several smaller fires and explosions, and a fifteen-foot tidal wave caused by the blast swept the dock area. The docked SS High Flyer, which was also carrying ammonium nitrate, subsequently caught fire, was towed 100 feet out, and exploded that night. Information for this description was drawn from the Handbook of Texas Online and the book The Texas City Disaster, 1947 by Hugh Stephens, published by the University of Texas Press.

Austin: University of Texas Press, 1997. Pp. xvi+141; illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Located thirty-five miles southeast of Houston, Texas City in the 1940s was home to a styrene plant, four oil refineries, two aviation gasoline plants, a Seatrain terminal, a tin smelter, a grain elevator, a cotton compress, and warehouses for sulfur, zinc, and other bulk commodities. Shipments of ammonium-nitrate fertilizer began in late 1945, when the . Army’s Cornhusker Ordnance Plant in Nebraska converted from explosives manufacturing to fertilizer. Tight wartime controls on explosives by the military were relaxed at the end of World War II, so the .

On April 16, 1947, a small fire broke out among bags of ammonium nitrate fertilizer in the hold of the ship Grandcamp as it lay docked at Texas City, Texas. Despite immediate attempts to extinguish the fire, it rapidly intensified until the Grandcamp exploded in a blast that caused massive loss of life and property. In the ensuing chaos, no one gave much thought to the ship in the next slip, the High Flyer. It exploded sixteen hours later.

The story of the Texas City explosions—America's worst industrial disaster in terms of casualties—has never been fully told until now. In this book, Hugh W. Stephens draws on official reports, newspaper and magazine articles, personal letters, and interviews with several dozen survivors to provide the first full account of the disaster at Texas City.

Stephens describes the two explosions and the heroic efforts of Southeast Texans to rescue survivors and cope with extensive property damage. At the same time, he explores why the disaster occurred, showing how a chain of indifference and negligence made a serious industrial accident almost inevitable, while a lack of emergency planning allowed it to escalate into a major catastrophe. This gripping, cautionary tale holds important lessons for a wide reading public.

Reviews: 7
Burirus
I was six years old when this tragic event occurred. How sad that the lessons from Texas City, Texas, were not known nor remembered by those people in West, Texas on April 17, 2013, the exact same day of the month of April in 1947 when the second ship, High Flyer, moored at the Texas City dock exploded. Although the death toll in West is fortunately relatively low, the preamble to the explosion and the pictures of the destruction are frightening similar. I knew personally one of the West volunteer firefighters who died in the fire and subsequent aftermath. It has been said with almost unerring accuracy that "those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it". The Oklahoma City bomb was constructed using the same ammonium nitrate base. After Texas City and Oklahoma City, it is inexcusable for this type of explosion to occur.
bass
I was born in Galveston and raised in Texas City until the age of about eleven when we moved to La Marque (about 7 miles away). I was 5 1/2 years old when my home town blew up. I remember it like it was yesterday.

My uncle was a volunteer fireman. He jumped on a passing car and yelled to his wife he was going to the fire at the docks. He was never seen again. I have a copy of the picture of firemen on the docks moments before the blast (page 26). I always think that one of the men in the picture looks a lot like my uncle, but I cannot be sure because I was so young.

On a recent visit to Texas City, I visited the museum and memorial park for the disaster victims. My uncle's name is on the memorial with the other firemen that were lost that day.
Jesmi
Before, during, and after this horrific episode, vital information wasn't being disseminated to the appropriate agencies due to a lack of reliable uniformed communications: in essence - the right hand did not know what the left hand was doing...
X-MEN
My mother-in-law was one of the school children in the local school when this disaster occurred. This book is excellent for anyone interested in this tragedy.
Tetaian
Was living in Galveston when it blew up. Found out my high school teacher saved my fathers life.
Laitchai
I was 2 yrs old when this happened in my home town of Texas City, TX. Recently, some of my high school friends & I had gotten together & were talking about this event. We visited the memorial in Texas City & it stirred up a desire to know more about this terrible tragedy. I found this book on the internet & decided to order it. I couldn't put it down when I started to read it. I was too young to remember what had happened & this book told me things I never knew. I now regret that I didn't talk more to my parents about the blast while they were alive. I am sure they had some interesting things to tell about it. The book was an excellent report on what happened & good reading for anyone.
Venemarr
Interesting narrative of the Texas City disaster. This may be a little technical for some readers, but I found it very interesting.
I lived near the Texas City area after the disaster, so this story was of interest to me. I had heard about it when the disaster took place and was interested in learning more of the details.