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ISBN:0979894069
Author: Suzanne Barta Julin
ISBN13: 978-0979894060
Title: A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles: Black Hills Tourism, 1880-1941
Format: mobi doc lit lrf
ePUB size: 1977 kb
FB2 size: 1571 kb
DJVU size: 1968 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: South Dakota State Hist Society Pr; 1st Edition edition (December 1, 2009)
Pages: 232

A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles: Black Hills Tourism, 1880-1941 by Suzanne Barta Julin



by Suzanne Barta Julin (Author). I've spent time in the Black Hills on a few different occasions and I love the history and the landscapes of the area. As such I was looking forward to learning more about the area and how it was started, but I was disappointed in the layout and the writing style of the book.

A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles book. A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles: Black Hills Tourism, 1880-1941. by. Suzanne B. Julin.

Suzanne Barta Julin ’01 PhD South Dakota State Historical Society Press, 2010. The faces of four presidents gaze down on the Black Hills of South Dakota, a fitting vigil for a tourist destination carved, like Mount Rushmore itself, by public policy, political machinations, and private investments.

book by Suzanne B. cloth cover with dustjacket, illustrated, maps, bibliography, index.

A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles: Black Hills Tourism, 1880–1941 by Suzanne Barta Julin.

Although the Indian Government has myriad schemes to promote tourism, there is no regulatory framework for the sector. If tourism is to be sustainable, with minimum impact on biodiversity and the environment, a regulatory policy framework is urgently needed.

The growth of tourism in Black Hills, South Dakota and the people from the state to promote the tourist industry that includes many very nice early black & white photos of the area.

Great Plains Quarterly. By Suzanne Barta Julin. Pierre: South Dakota State Historical Society Press, 2009. xi + 221 pp. Maps, illustrations, notes, bibliography, index.

I came away from reading "A Marvelous Hundred Square Miles: Black Hills Tourism, 1880-1941" with an enlarged appreciation for the late former governor and . senator Peter Norbeck. That the newly released 234-page book by Suzanne Barta Julin added to my respect for Norbeck is saying quite a lot. Earlier this year, I read what is apparently the only book-length biography of Norbeck ever written: "Peter Norbeck: Prairie Statesman," by Gilbert Fite.

cloth cover with dustjacket, illustrated, maps, bibliography, index
Reviews: 4
Ielonere
This is a wonderful book, tightly focused on the impact that tourism had on some of the most beautiful land in America. Having been to the modern day counterparts described here in their infancy, it has reawakened my desire to return to the Black Hills and see them through eyes that now understand just what a huge undertaking it was to get people to come and see what was out there. Julin has done a good job uncovering the political maneuverings that occurred to build up the area, including getting the President to spend his summer there.

The only thing that I found lacking was the brevity. I would have loved it had Julin been able to work first person anecdotes into the latter half of the narrative, seeing as how some of the people who were there and working on the Black Hills projects are still alive. That touch would have set the book off in just the right way, I feel. But it doesn't detract from what she has done here, and that is write a really cracking good glimpse at the pioneer spirit and how that was transmuted into bringing the tourists to them.
sobolica
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

I've spent time in the Black Hills on a few different occasions and I love the history and the landscapes of the area. As such I was looking forward to learning more about the area and how it was started, but I was disappointed in the layout and the writing style of the book. While it is evident that the author has a great passion and knowledge of the area, she lacked a good editor to make the book readable.

It is evident from the beginning that the author has a passion for the area and is extremely knowledgeable about how it came into being. From the introduction I had hopes that it would read more like a travelogue taking the reader on a journey into the areas past and letting us into the hidden details. And although the information is solid, the book doesn't read that way at all. In fact its often downright confusing. Within one chapter we're reading about tourism, but in the span of four pages we start at 1897 go to 1913, then jump back to 1911 and introduced to even more people. There are no clear delineations to help the reader focus on one time period or one area within the chapter and it's very difficult to keep up with what area you're in.

The overall information and photographs used within the book however are fairly solid (she does gloss over the fact that Mt. Rushmore's land was essentially stolen from the Native Americans and was sacred land to them). It's a useful book if someone is writing a history paper on the area or has specific facets of information that they are looking up, not so much for a pleasure read.
Dilkree
My grandmother's stories of her young adult years in the Black Hills piqued my initial interest in this book. As a young adult myself, I had visited the area, but time constraints had prevented my lingering and processing the environment. Reading this book satisfied my need to learn more about the Black Hills and why it became a prominent tourist destination for motorists and families. I was impressed with Ms. Julin's scholarly presentation and documentation of historical facts and by the physical beauty of the book. The black and white historical photographs placed generously throughout are fascinating and augment the reading experience. The glossy cover with its colored photograph of tour bus passengers pausing along the road makes the book a delight to look at and hold.

As a reader of more fiction than nonfiction, I wondered if I would have the attention span to complete this book. The text is dense with facts, and I found I needed to read each chapter as a unit with a break in between in order to process the information. This strategy allowed me to grasp the steps in the development of tourism in the Black Hills as well as the larger picture. The characters of the main players in this development, especially Peter Norbeck, are revealed through the political ambitions and maneuverings detailed in the book. I found the story both instructive and entertaining, and I would highly recommend it to any reader who is interested in the history of this region.
Captain America
I highly recommend Suzanne Julin's intriguing and informative historical portrait of this uniquely wonderful "hundred square miles". Anyone who has visited the Black Hills or is planning to visit should read it. Our visit in the past was much too brief and superficial, but with this perspective, our next visit won't be! The book is well written, factual, and very readable.