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Download Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs epub book
ISBN:0465070744
Author: David R. Roediger
ISBN13: 978-0465070749
Title: Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs
Format: mbr docx docx lit
ePUB size: 1650 kb
FB2 size: 1216 kb
DJVU size: 1237 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Basic Books; 7.9.2006 edition (August 8, 2006)
Pages: 352

Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs by David R. Roediger



How did immigrants to the United States come to see themselves as white? David R. Roediger has been in the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history for decades. He first came to prominence as the author of The Wages of Whiteness. David Roediger has given us another of our most compelling, incisive, and elegant analyses of racial subjugation and ing in the United Sates. Working Toward Whiteness is a brilliant investigation of that historical zone where institutions, ideas, and street-level experiences meet and give form to one another. It may be Roediger's most powerful contribution yet. An exemplary work.

David Roediger has been toiling for years in the historical trenches, documenting the social construction of race. This is another solid entry in that category. It's not exhaustive, but compiles material on how Eastern and Southern European immigrants to the . The category of "white people" is treated as a given, and as a constant in the . today, but Roediger and others reveal the shifting meaning of the category, and the fight that various groups have waged to gain entry into the "white club" with its privileges. The strange Journey from Ellis Isla. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. By exposing the racial side of the European immigrants. improvement has to do with what color you are and nothing more in the United Stated of America.

Working Toward Whiteness book. How did immigrants to the United States come to see themselves as white? David R. He first came to prominence as the author of The Wages of Whiteness, a classic study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whitene How did immigrants to the United States come to see themselves as white? David R.

In Working Toward Whiteness, he brings that history forward into the twentieth-century. Roediger recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and e occupied a liminal racial status in their new country, and only gradually achieved the status of white Americans. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants-the racist real estate agreements that kept immigrants out of white er explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. Working Toward Whiteness is a tour de forc. his book will be the point-of-departure for future studies of ‘whiteness. -Rudolph J. Vecoli, professor of history, University of Minnesota. New York: Basic Books, 2005.

Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White; The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs. Working Toward Whiteness: How America's Immigrants Became White; The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs. Cite this publication.

In Working Toward Whiteness, Roediger continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how ethnic groups considered white today - including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans - were once viewed as undesirables by the WASP establishment in the United States.

Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today - and into America's cultural insiders.

Working Toward Whiteness. How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs. by David R. Roediger. In Working Toward Whiteness, Roediger continues that history into the twentieth century. Once assimilated as fully white, many of them adopted the racism of those whites who formerly looked down on them as inferior.

David Roediger’s book Working Toward Whiteness: How America’s Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs continues his provocative exploration of whiteness studies by examining how southern and eastern European immigrants became white during the first half of the twentieth century. View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. From Publishers Weekly. Roediger hearkens back to the 1924 immigration restrictions, showing how they drove the "great migration" of African-Americans northward, thus rendering immigrants less "foreign" to some entrenched whites. Reinforcing that were the immigrant drive for home ownership, backed by New Deal era restrictive racial covenants and laws against interracial marriage.

At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.
Reviews: 7
Ferri - My name
Great book!! Focusing around Europeans moving into the United States adjusting to a new pseudonym term called “white”. Which after reading this book will solidify it’s a term that loosely meant a class system. As Europeans mainly from southern and Eastern Europe were not classified as white and were taunted. Italians were hung. Greeks were discriminated against and called non white. The main reason for all Europeans being called white has more to do with economic movements. African and Asians Americans stared encroaching economically into the European Americans world. Then you start getting these so called all white neighborhoods. Ethnicity identity declined. And the quote white identity prevailed. Race identity has more to do with a Europeans class system more than anything else. White is elite superior Right etc. While black represents Low level slave heathen inferiority. African ppl are different tones of brown. Humans don’t come in black?!!!
Cointrius
Roediger's book, Working Towards Whiteness helps to illuminate a gap in most American's historical knowledge, the shifting line of racial classification. While we often accept that current definition of race, including whiteness are givens, Roediger does a great job of laying out the process of how many European immigrants, while "white" wouldn't have been the beneficiaries of the privileges of "whiteness" they share in today.

While we've got a long way to go towards being a fully inclusive country, we could make a great deal more headway towards that goal if people took the time to read this work.
Kesalard
How we have forgotten history.
Huston
Stunning!! It is impossible to understand race in America without reading the history outlined in this book.
Kalrajas
Remarkable book.
Cel
This is one of the finest sociological treatises on American immigration of a former "underclass"- -working Whites from southern and eastern Europe who came to this country in droves between the 1880s and 1930s. Roediger presents a solid analytical framework for readers to use as a compass through the complex history and transformation of "foreigners" of the same color into "gradual natives" whose color is a badge of acceptable passage over time. Here we see Jews, Italians, Poles, Ukrainians and other "undesirables" sweat their way across factory floors, climb to academic heights, even get elected to high national offices beyond the dreams of their ancestors. The data are presented clearly; the interpretations are crisp and penetrating. Roediger does a great service to his subjects who happened to be "Americans in the making". A must study for any scholar of race and assimilation, and a good read for anyone interested in how some of us got to be "Americans" even with the wrong religions, national origins, or accents as impediments fueled by homegrown bigots of an earlier time!
jorik
Rare topic well voiced.
Fantastic