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ISBN:0807127051
Author: Mark Fernandez
ISBN13: 978-0807127056
Title: From Chaos to Continuity: The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712--1862
Format: mbr doc lrf lrf
ePUB size: 1844 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: LSU Press; First edition (October 1, 2001)
Pages: 135

From Chaos to Continuity: The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712--1862 by Mark Fernandez



Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 34. 63 21. Personal Name: Fernandez, Mark . 1958-. Rubrics: Justice, Administration of Louisiana History Courts Judges. by Stephen Joel Trachtenberg.

Mark Fernandez's new book, From Chaos to Continuity, must therefore be seen as a significant contribution to the developing effort by Louisiana legal scholars and historians to end this marginalization.

In From Chaos to Continuity, Mark F. Fernandez challenges both perspectives. Using the innovative methods of the New Louisiana Legal History, he offers the first comprehensive analysis of the role of the courts in the development of Louisiana's legal system and convincingly argues that the state is actually a representative model of American law and justice.

Mark F. Fernandez, From Chaos to Continuity: The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712–1862, Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001. Samantha Holtkamp Gervase (a1). University of California, Los Angeles. Published online: 28 October 2011. Recommend this journal.

By Mark F. Fernandez. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001. One consequence, as Mark Fernandez points out in the introduction to his new study of Louisiana's legal system, From Chaos to Continuity, is that mainstream American lawyers and legal historians pay little attention to Louisiana. The state has its local academic lawyers, who, as Fernandez notes, publish "specialized studies of the fine points of civil law in legal publications" (xiv). Fernandez, From Chaos to Continuity: The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712-1862 (Louisiana State University Press 2001). 6. Moore, supra note 4, at 208-09. Essays in the New Louisiana Legal History 81-82 (Warren Billings, Mark F. Fernandez ed. LSU Press 2001). The American administration moved quickly to deal with this new acquisition and began by dividing Louisiana into two districts referred to initially as. Upper and Lower Louisiana.

From chaos to continuity: The evolution of Louisiana’s judicial system, 1712-1862. Historians have long viewed Louisiana as an anomaly in the American judicial system-an eccentric appendage at the mouth of the Mississippi River. From Chaos to Continuity liberates Louisiana’s legal history from the quirky restraints of the past and allows scholars and students alike to see the state as an integral part of American legal history. From Chaos to Continuity: The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712-1862.

From Chaos to Continuity. The Evolution of Louisiana's Judicial System, 1712–1862. Publisher: LSU Press. Print ISBN: 9780807156889, 0807156884. eText ISBN: 9780807156865, 0807156868. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780807156865, 0807156868. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780807156889, 0807156884. Get to Know Us. About VitalSource.

Historians have long viewed Louisiana as an anomaly in the American judicial system -- an eccentric appendage at the mouth of the Mississippi River. The diverse Creole culture and civilian heritage of the state's legal system have led many scholars to conclude that it is an anachronism in American law unworthy of serious attention. Others embrace this tradition and revel in the minutiae of the Pelican State's unique civil law legacy. In From Chaos to Continuity, Mark F. Fernandez challenges both perspectives. Using the innovative methods of the New Louisiana Legal History, he offers the first comprehensive analysis of the role of the courts in the development of Louisiana's legal system and convincingly argues that the state is actually a representative model of American law and justice

.

Tracing the rise of Louisiana's system from its earliest colonial origins to its closure during Federal occupation in 1862, Fernandez describes the introduction of common law after American takeover of the colony; the chaotic combination of French, Spanish, and Anglo legal traditions; the evolution of that jurisdiction; the role of the courts -- especially the state supreme court -- in maintaining the mixture; and the judge's proper function in administering justice. According to Fernandez, the challenge of integrating two very different systems of law was not unique to Louisiana. Indeed, most antebellum southern states had legal systems that incorporated important traditional aspects of their colonial legal orders to varying degrees.

From Chaos to Continuity liberates Louisiana's legal history from the quirky restraints of the past and allows scholars and students alike to see the state as an integral part of American legal history.