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ISBN:0803237642
Author: Janice E. Haslam,Gerald W. Haslam
ISBN13: 978-0803237643
Title: In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. I. Hayakawa
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ePUB size: 1113 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Bison Books (November 1, 2011)
Pages: 472

In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. I. Hayakawa by Janice E. Haslam,Gerald W. Haslam



Haslam, Gerald W. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln Hayakawa had hoped to use this soapbox to address the assembled demonstrators, but instead he ended up ripping out speaker wires and halting an illegal campus demonstration or denying first-amendment rights to the crowd, depending on your perspective. Indeed, Hayakawa's entire life defies simplistic labels, and his ability to be categorized largely depends on personal perspective. This intimate and detailed biography draws on interviews with friends and family members, as well as Hayakawa's own papers and journals, to bring this controversial and fascinating figure to life

By Gerald W. Haslam with Janice E. Haslam. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011. Gerald Haslam is entering his fifth decade of publishing novels, essays, stories, monographs, and anthologies as the primary interpreter of California in the context of the American West. In book-length studies and collections like Workin’ Man Blues: Country Music in California (1999) and Haslam’s Valley (2005), he has brought to national awareness the distinctiveness of California’s Great Central Valley as California’s Heartland and The Other California. In Haslam’s words, Hayakawa was a typical boy of the Canadian prairie, and, in Hayakawa’s own words, he was already determined to be a writer, although he pursued a PhD in English, in case, he said, I couldn’t make a living as a poet (18, 29, 37).

Janice E. Haslam is the coauthor, with Gerald W. Haslam, of the fiction collection Manuel and the Madman and An Instructor's Guide to Many Californias. In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. I. Hayakawa traces the fascinating life of an iconic American writer, teacher, politician, and family man. In the process, authors Gerald W. Haslam and Janice E. Haslam tell us a lot about the culture wars of the 20th century-and of American identity itself. Discussing both Hayakawa's virtues and his defects, the book is thorough, readable, and sympathetic. J. Rorabaugh, Journal of American History. Haslam and his wife, Janice, have done a brilliant job in this timely biography. -Jud Snyder, Community Voice. An ingenious portrait. -Greg Robinson, Nichi Rei. Table of Contents.

Jacqueline Rudig (Treasurer, Institute of General Semantics) presents the 2013 Hayakawa Book Prize on behalf of the Trustees for the Institute of General Semantics to Gerald W. and Janice E. Haslam for their book "In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. Hayakawa. Presented at the 61st Alfred Korzybski Memorial Lecture & 2-Day General Semantics Symposium, sponsored by the Institute of General Semantics at the Princeton Club in New York City, Friday, October 25, 2013.

In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. Hayakawa Gerald W. Haslam, Janice E. Haslam One of the most gripping images from the 1960s captures the slight figure of Dr. S. Hayakawa scrambling onto a sound truck parked in front of San Francisco State College amid campus unrest. Hayakawa had hoped to use this soapbox to address the assembled demonstrators, but instead he ended up ripping out speaker wires and halting an illegal campus demonstration-or denying first-amendment rights to the crowd, depending on your perspective

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Gerald Haslam is entering his fifth decade of publishing novels, essays, stories .

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. In Thought and Action : The Enigmatic Life of S.

In thought and action. The Enigmatic Life of . by Gerald W. Haslam (English Emeritus/Sonoma State Univ. Workin’ Man Blues: Country Music in California, 1999, et., a student and colleague of his subject’s, admits that while he thought much of the left’s criticism of Hayakawa was unfair, he and the senator drifted apart politically as well as professionally. Nevertheless, the book is a promise kept to Hayakawa’s wife. Haslam (with his own wife as partner) was a good choice for biographer. He clearly admired his subject but is fair (though discreet) about his flaws, including a reputation for philandering.

With his wife Janice E. Haslam, Haslam examined the life of Senator S. Hayakawa (In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S. Hayakawa) and the life of a Depression migrant (Leon Patterson: A California Story). the Heartland's Voice," The Californians, Ja. Feb Personal life. They reside in Penngrove, California

Gerald William Haslam (born March 18, 1937) is an author who has focused on rural and small towns in California's Great Central Valley including its poor and working class people of all colors. A native of Oildale, California, Haslam has received numerous literary awards. Most recently in a pair of biographies he and wife Janice E. Haslam have examined the life of Senator S.

One of the most gripping images from the 1960s captures the slight figure of Dr. S. I. Hayakawa scrambling onto a sound truck parked in front of San Francisco State College amid campus unrest. Hayakawa had hoped to use this soapbox to address the assembled demonstrators, but instead he ended up ripping out speaker wires and halting an illegal campus demonstration—or denying first-amendment rights to the crowd, depending on your perspective. Indeed, Hayakawa’s entire life defies simplistic labels, and his ability to be categorized largely depends on personal perspective. This intimate and detailed biography draws on interviews with friends and family members, as well as Hayakawa’s own papers and journals, to bring this controversial and fascinating figure to life. He was an enigma to colleagues as well as adversaries, a Republican senator who consistently bucked his party’s ideals with his support of the women’s movement, abortion rights, and even Ronald Reagan’s search for a female running mate. The son of Japanese immigrants, born and raised in Canada before moving to the United States, Hayakawa emerges here as a complex and complicated figure. His blend of heritage, politics, artistic inclination, and intellectual achievement makes him quintessentially American. Visit the author's Web site for bibliographic notes.
Reviews: 4
Gogal
Hayakawa was a naturalized hyphenated American who was born and raised in Canada, I am a hyphenated American of the same ancestral extraction as Mr. Hayakawa, so there was a particular interest on my part to read his biography. I was a Californian in my early life and I was in my twenties and early thirties when Hayakawa made a statement against Japanese-American reparation payments for their incarceration during WWII. I was in agreement with his reasoning. Japanese-Americans at the time reparations were demanded were already ahead of other Americans in income-why ask for more than being allowed the success they made for themselves? I think the author did a commendable job of documenting Hayakawa. The man (Hayakawa) and the book were entertaining and informative (I didn't realize that semantics was not a worthwhile subject to many academics).
Xurad
This book describes many aspects of Hayakawa the man that were omitted or distorted in the media while he was alive. I knew him personally and had the privilege of several live conversations with him. Of course these conversations were confined to his professional and public activities. Our last few meetings took place after he had been evicted from the organization (ISGS) he founded. He had not heard from any of the current members for over a year. He did not care to discuss the separation but I knew it was for political reasons that I never understood vary well. This book clarified a lot of things about the separation for me. Hayakawa claimed to be applying methods developed by Korzybski but Korzybski never approved of anything Hayakawa did. I was introduced to the author by a mutual friend, a very prominent psychotherapist, who told him I could probably be of assistance with some of the technical details of Korzybski's general semantic system. I assisted the author in the writing of the book and some of my pithy comments were quoted in it. The author treated me as his primary source of technical information about general semantics. Professional psychotherapists who employed Korzybski's methods in their work considered me to be the world's leading authority on the work of Korzybski.
Melipra
I wanted to read In Thought and Action because I was curious to learn more about S. I. Hayakawa. I live in San Francisco and he was a very high profile personality in the Bay Area throughout the 1960's, `70's and `80's. And, as the book's subtitle points out, Hayakawa was an enigma.

The book did provide lots of insights into Dr. Hayakawa's life and life experiences. Now I better understand this very interesting teacher, senator and man. I was particularly impressed with the depth of the research done by the authors and their non-judgmental and unbiased reporting on his life. This biography even prompted me to order one of Hayakawa's books.

But, equally interesting to me, this book provided a special perspective of that era - the people, the politics and the culture. Admittedly that view is through the life of one man, but that individual's life did span a wide spectrum of our culture and our country during a very important time - a time of great change.

I found the book inspirational and would recommend it to anyone curious about general semantics, our educational system, politics, race relations and our cultural heritage as well as the man, S. I. Hayakawa.
Yahm
I greatly enjoyed In Thought and Action. This highly readable book provides a portrait of a man who, as the subtitle suggests, was quite an enigma. Politically, a liberal, if not a radical in the 1930's and 1940's, he became a Republican--but not always a conventionally conservative--U.S. Senator in the 1970's and 1980's. A Japanese man who observed discrimination in his early life, he failed to believe that Japanese Americans interned during WWII deserved compensation. Though the authors were friends of Hayakawa, they have gone out of their way to show both the best and the worst of Hayakawa's life. In the author's words, Hiyakawa "was a gifted but flawed man, one who refused to capitulate to racism, or to elitism, to radicalism or to convention, and the sweep of his story is remarkable." If you'd like to get to know the real S.I. Hiyakawa, the man behind the headlines, this is your book.