» » Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica
Download Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica epub book
ISBN:0822350866
Author: Deborah A. Thomas
ISBN13: 978-0822350866
Title: Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica
Format: mobi lrf lit txt
ePUB size: 1798 kb
FB2 size: 1382 kb
DJVU size: 1868 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Duke University Press (October 5, 2011)
Pages: 320

Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica by Deborah A. Thomas



Start by marking Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by. Deborah A. Thomas. Exceptional Violence is a sophisticated examination of postcolonial state formation in the Caribbean, considered across time and space, from the period of imperial New World expansion to the contemporary neoliberal era, and from neighborhood dynamics in Kingston to transnational socioeconomic and political fields.

At the opening of her book Thomas explained that she did not originally set out to write about violence, for its prominence in present-day Jamaican society seemed to have rendered it cliché as a subject for academic study. Yet, as her work in Exceptional Violence makes abundantly clear, the cliché is not the violence itself but the simplistic ways violence-and citizenship-have thus far been addressed in Jamaica and elsewhere.

Personal Name: Thomas, Deborah . 1966-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Exceptional violence : embodied citizenship in transnational Jamaica, Deborah A.

Deborah A. Thomas takes as her fast concentration violence in Jamaica and representations of that violence as they circulation in the state and in another country. cultural coverage, Thomas develops numerous arguments  . Read Online or Download Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica PDF. Similar anthropology books. Download e-book for iPad: The Anthropology of Magic by Susan Greenwood.

Exceptional Violence. Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica. Book Pages: 320 Illustrations: 11 illustrations Published: October 2011. Author: Deborah A. Subjects Anthropology Cultural Anthropology, Caribbean Studies, Postcolonial and Colonial Studies. In Sum, Thomas’ treatment of violence in the Caribbean offers an alternative perspective not just on curbing violence, but on understanding avenues for social change. Marlyn J. Jones, Canadian Journal of History. Exceptional Violence is a theoretically sophisticated examination of contemporary Jamaica, with much to offer students of postcolonialism, anthropology, transnationalism, and the African diaspora.

In this supremely engaging book, Deborah A. Thomas puts to rest a number of procrustean, often racist, preconceptions about violence in Jamaica and, by extension, other postcolonies. But Thomas does more than this. She opens up a window into the very soul of Jamaica and its diasporas, examining how Jamaicans today envisage and make their futures; how new, embodied forms of subjectivity and citizenship are being practiced and performed; and how we may understand the role of ‘culture’ and representation in these processes. Exceptional Violence is the kind of book from which not only every anthropologist but every intelligent reader will learn something worth knowing.

In reframing the historical object of violence in Jamaica, she enables us to see hitherto obscured dimensions of its embodied constitution as social practice and social imaginary, its relation to citizenship and gender, the state and community, racial subjectivities and. transnational migrations. It is a fine achievement. David Scott, Columbia University.

Exceptional Violence is a sophisticated examination of postcolonial state formation in the Caribbean, considered across time and space, from the period of imperial New World expansion to the contemporary neoliberal era, and from neighborhood dynamics in Kingston to transnational socioeconomic and political fields. Deborah A. Thomas takes as her immediate focus violence in Jamaica and representations of that violence as they circulate within the country and abroad. Through an analysis encompassing Kingston communities, Jamaica’s national media, works of popular culture, notions of respectability, practices of punishment and discipline during slavery, the effects of intensified migration, and Jamaica’s national cultural policy, Thomas develops several arguments. Violence in Jamaica is the complicated result of a structural history of colonialism and underdevelopment, not a cultural characteristic passed from one generation to the next. Citizenship is embodied; scholars must be attentive to how race, gender, and sexuality have been made to matter over time. Suggesting that anthropologists in the United States should engage more deeply with history and political economy, Thomas mobilizes a concept of reparations as a framework for thinking, a rubric useful in its emphasis on structural and historical lineages.
Reviews: 2
Gio
You would love this book if you were in a program for a doctors degree. To hard for the average person to understand unless they are going for a doctors degree.
Qag
Thomas' engagement with the transnational elements of citizenship is impressive. Her chapter on the Coral Gardens "crucifixion" of 1963 is particularly astute and well-researched; and her film on this event is also a good resource for students interested in this topic. However, her thesis linking embodied memory to Jamaica's problems with murder is the most dissatisfying element of this book. I question the efficacy of research on a social problem that limits data collection to cultural documents and cultural productions; resulting in simplistic and unsubstantiated statements such as "most Jamaicans would casually root the proliferation of spectacularly performed murders in the consumption of North American films." Murder is a serious social problem that requires rigorous field research in the communities most affected by this crime, and it is unfortunate that this did not take place in this study.