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ISBN:0405044577
Author: Eliza Woodson Burhans Farnham
ISBN13: 978-0405044571
Title: Life in Prairie Land (American Women: Images and Realities)
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ePUB size: 1434 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Ayer Co Pub (June 1, 1972)
Pages: 408

Life in Prairie Land (American Women: Images and Realities) by Eliza Woodson Burhans Farnham



Eliza Woodson Burhans Farnham. Eliza Farnham, a New Yorker who would become one of the leading feminists of her time, describes the nearly five years she spent living in the prairie land of Tazewell County. Life in Prairie Land" is a complex portrait of the midwestern wilderness during the 1830s - beautiful and ugly, beneficent and threatening.

Eliza Farnham, a New Yorker who would become one of the leading feminists of her time, describes the nearly five years she spent living in the prairie land of Tazewell County. Life in Prairie Land is a complex portrait of the midwestern wilderness during the 1830s-beautiful and ugly, beneficent and threatening. Farnham's vivid recreation of her experiences on the Illinois frontier offers a realistic depiction of the harsh pioneer lifestyle as well as a romantic view of an Edenic landscape

Life in Prairie Land Paperback – January 10, 2012. by Eliza Woodson Burhans Farnham (Author). While detailed descriptions are not extensive, the book did not disappoint in that respect. At first I was put off by flowery passages, but as I became drawn to the author's life in this land, I thoroughly enjoyed every word. The life she describes can hardly be imagined unless you habitually seek out such historical writings. I was amazed by the life she describes, including both difficulties and pleasures.

Life in prairie land. Publication date 1846. Topics Illinois - Description and travel, Illinois - Social life and customs. New York Public Library. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Eliza Woodson Burhans (1815-11-17)November 17, 1815 Rensselaerville, New York. December 15, 1864(1864-12-15) (aged 49) New York City, New York. California, In-doors and Out, 1856 - A chronicle of her experiences and observations on California. My Early Days, 1859 - An autobiographical novel. Notable American Women: 1607–1950: A Biographical Dictionary. Harvard University Press.

Personal Name: Farnham, Eliza W. (Eliza Wood), 1815-1864. Series Statement: Women on the move. General Note: Reprint of the New York, 1855 ed. Personal Name: Farnham, Eliza W. Geographic Name: Illinois Description and travel. Geographic Name: Illinois Social life and customs. Geographic Name: Illinois History 1778-1865. Download Life in prairie land (1855). leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: African American Baptists.

Eliza Wood Burhans Farnham, née Eliza Wood Burhans, (born Nov. 17, 1815, Rensselaerville, . died Dec. 15, 1864, New York, . American reformer and writer, an early advocate of the importance of rehabilitation as a focus of prison internment. Eliza Burhans grew up from age four in the unhappy home of foster parents. At age 15 she came into the care of an uncle, and she briefly attended the Albany Female Academy. During that period she had published her first book, Life in Prairie Land (1846). She then worked briefly with Laura Bridgman, who was deaf, at Boston’s Perkins Institute, until she heard of the death of her husband in September 1848 in San Francisco.

Eliza Farnham (November 17, 1815 – December 15, 1864) was a 19th-century American novelist, feminist, abolitionist, and activist for prison reform. Books related to Life in Prairie Land. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories From the Sketch Book. Life in the Clearings versus the Bush.

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Eliza Burhans grew up from age four in the unhappy home of foster parents. In 1835 she went to live with a married sister in Tazewell county, Illinois, where in 1836 she married Thomas Jefferson Farnham, a lawyer who soon won fame as a Western explorer. In 1844 Farnham won appointment as matron of the women's division of Sing Sing State Prison in Ossining, New York. She instituted a highly advanced regime, allowing inmates to speak to one another, which had previously been banned, and setting up a system of discussions, privileges, and useful training. Her liberal approach to penology won her numerous enemies, however, and in 1848 she was forced to resign.

Reviews: 7
Faehn
Very interesting reading about a young lady's life in moving to Illinois, after growing up in a city back east. A long read and she is a little windy once in awhile. But a very good story of life in the 1846 an on during her life, and we think we have it hard. WE DON'T!! As my wife says she though she was better then everyone in the beginning, but through out the book she started loving the life she had and the experiences and hardship everyone went through. And when things started to grow in the Prairie Land and more people people came with all of there problems good and bad, she did not like it. They were terrible people and she wished they would have never started coming to Illinois. Ending is a good part of the story she tells about Starve Rock....... enjoy!
Lcena
As a volunteer in ecological restoration in the Chicago area, initially I was drawn to this book for possible descriptions of Illinois lands during the time of the author. A number of sources, including land surveys, have been collected and summarized for this purpose, but I wanted to read descriptions written by someone who was an actual witness. While detailed descriptions are not extensive, the book did not disappoint in that respect.

At first I was put off by flowery passages, but as I became drawn to the author's life in this land, I thoroughly enjoyed every word. The life she describes can hardly be imagined unless you habitually seek out such historical writings. I was amazed by the life she describes, including both difficulties and pleasures. She also writes with a biting, humorous wit at times. In the first part of the book, some of her attitudes seem provincial and a bit cruel, but just recall somewhat similar humor by Twain and read on. People lived in more narrowly defined communities in those times, without the benefit of widespread communication of our times.

The author is impressive in her observations of nature, human society, politics, and history. I had not heard of her previously, but then learned she was quite an activist and reformer. I intend to read more of her works.
Puchock
This is a diary of a family crossing from East to Oregon in the early 1800s. Anyone who has hiked long dusty, days without end on a hot trail will know what all the Western pioneers went through traveling West. While East of the Missouri River was green, water, civilization, family and settled living, the West was a wilderness of deserts, little grass for livestock and devoid of water or cities. Constant threats from starving and robbery from desperadoes and attack from Indians wore on the mind.

So, why did they leave the comforts of the East for the dangers of the West? The answer; within the human psyche, our spirituality, our optimism is our great need for freedom and exploration. We go where none have went before and took our lumps getting there. We anticipated the reward of free land and freedom.
Sharpbrew
Ms. Farnham showed an insightful intelligence of her environment and the relationships between men and women. Her advocacy for a better awareness for the rightful treatment of women was admirable. Her descriptions of the environment on the prairie were outstanding, though her description of daily labors in those small, isolated cabins grew tedious, paragraphs a full page long, and I skimmed through the second half of the book. Not an exciting read but very perceptive and well-written on her part.
Yojin
Great book on early pioneer life in the Plains---if you like this book you will also want to read:
1. By Ox Team to California: A Narrative of Crossing the Plains in 1860
2. CALIFORNIA: A Trip Across the Plains, in the Spring of 1850
3. Pioneer Women Crossing the Rocky Mountains: Authentic Accounts of Heroism and Adventure (Illustrated)
4. Days on the Road: Crossing the Plains in 1865 (1902)
Kerdana
Couldn't finish it. One of rare times I couldn't finish a book. Although I have a great interest in the subject she writes in one run-on sentence and goes back and forth from describing life in those times and her emotional visions of past and present. Just got to be too much to try to understand.
Reddefender
I got this book because I enjoy western history as told from a first hand perspective. Upon reading this book it seemed too edited to be original. That is the expressions were modernized to such a degree, that I doubt the book was first hand account of crossing and living in the plains. Oh well.
Lots of Very long descriptions of plants, animals, even people and not really much story about people and their lives on the prairie during this time in history.