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ISBN:0816517711
Author: Peter R. Decker
ISBN13: 978-0816517718
Title: Old Fences, New Neighbors
Format: lrf lit doc lrf
ePUB size: 1364 kb
FB2 size: 1962 kb
DJVU size: 1837 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Arizona Press (August 1, 1998)
Pages: 159

Old Fences, New Neighbors by Peter R. Decker



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Download Old fences, new neighbors Peter R. Decker. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Belief and doubt. Dhimmis (Islamic law). On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Old fences, new neighbors, Peter R.

Old Fences, New Neighbors Paperback – January 1, 2006. by Peter Decker (Author). Peter Decker has distilled twenty-five years of ranching in Ridgeway, a previous life as a combat soldier, seaman, and as journalist into a warm but unsentimental book that appreciates the values of the real West as opposed to the Disneyfied, Hollywoodenized versions that glorify a time and a way of life that never was.

Today, a new traffic light signals, "go" to new Hummer's and other fancy sports-utility vehicles where once pickup trucks ambled slowly down the one main street in Ridgway. Fast-food restaurants have found a home in this small town, not many, but one or two-enough to send a sign to residents that change is here to stay. Change is inevitable. How folks deal with it is something else. This letter from Ridgway was written by a reformed New Yorker and tells the story of his love affair with the West, his reconciliation with change, and his thoughts on the future.

Old Fences, New Neighbors. ISBN 9780816519057 (978-0-8165-1905-7) Softcover, University of Arizona Press, 1998. Find signed collectible books: 'Old Fences, New Neighbors'. Old Fences, New Neighbors: ISBN 9780816519057 (978-0-8165-1905-7) Softcover, University of Arizona Press, 1998. Founded in 1997, BookFinder

Old Fences, New Neighbors is a chronicle of how one small rural community is dealing with the changes currently sweeping the West. It is also the firsthand perspective of a working rancher. Decker, himself once an outsider in Ouray County, left a career as a professor of history and bought a ranch in the area in 1974, where a local told him it was fine to have a Ph. but "in this country, son, it darn well better mean a posthole digger. In Old Fences, New Neighbors, Decker gives us a hard, realistic look at his own experience with ranching: the elaborate machinations of a cattle. Decker, Peter Randolph was born on October 1, 1934 in New York City. Son of Frank Randolph and Marjorie (Marony) Decker.

One of the best books.

Read Old Fences, New Neighbors by Peter R. Decker Free Online I'm back. though differently, certainly more materialistic, the drive to 'homestead' is still in.

Office of Indian Affairs. White River Agency (Colo. Ute Indians, Wars, 1879, White River Massacre, Colo. 1879, White collar workers. California, Colorado, Ouray County (Colo. San Francisco, Ute Indian Reservation, Ute Indian Reservation (Colo.

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The West is changing. "There are few places in the American West more isolated than Ouray County," writes Peter Decker. And yet in recent years this once-rural ranching and mining area in Colorado's mountain country has experienced dramatic alterations in its landscape, economic base, and population. The residents of Ridgway, Colorado, who once numbered only a few hundred, now listen to the hum from the highway as ski-toting tourists head for the Rockies and the swish of the fringe jackets of the new breed of "gentleman ranchers" who are buying up more and more land in the area. Old Fences, New Neighbors is a chronicle of how one small rural community is dealing with the changes currently sweeping the West. It is also the firsthand perspective of a working rancher. Decker, himself once an outsider in Ouray County, left a career as a professor of history and bought a ranch in the area in 1974, where a local told him it was fine to have a Ph. D., but "in this country, son, it darn well better mean a posthole digger." In Old Fences, New Neighbors, Decker gives us a hard, realistic look at his own experience with ranching: the elaborate machinations of a cattle drive, the struggle to irrigate fields when water is so scarce, the pain and beauty of cow birth. Few of the newest residents of Ridgway, however, wish to experience this former way of life. Instead, many are absentee landowners brought to the area by a new tourist economy, an economy that has raised land prices and has made it impossible for traditional ranchers to make ends meet. While the old way of life is ending, progress can also mean the influx of new ideas and valuable change. Decker recognizes the positive impact of outsiders and tourists on Ridgway: they have created a community of greater tolerance and diversity in an area that was once set in its ways.
Reviews: 4
Usaxma
ok
Kage
We were drawn to the area by its natural beauty. Having read Peter Decker's personal and historical account, we now appreciate the region even more.
Chilldweller
I'm sure I'm biased because I live here but I read this book after my arrival. It is fascinating to find this place so steeped in history and loved by so many in this book.
Charyoll
Peter Decker has distilled twenty-five years of ranching in Ridgeway, a previous life as a combat soldier, seaman, and as journalist into a warm but unsentimental book that appreciates the values of the real West as opposed to the Disneyfied, Hollywoodenized versions that glorify a time and a way of life that never was. Decker's reality is far more interesting.
His chapters on what life is like on a ranch, what it is like for an outsider to try to find acceptance in a community like Ridgeway, what the frustrations are and what are the real joys would be enough to make this book well worth the reading for anyone who wants to know about life in a small town in the American West at the turn of our century. But there is much more.
Decker has woven the land, the history, the people and the present into a gem of a book. The issues of how rural people with their values are affected when the migration pattern of countryside to city are reversed can be applied to small towns all over the country. Decker does not offer solutions but his clear-eyed warmth and his understanding of people, the strengths and their failings makes fascinating reading.