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ISBN:1452653100
Author: Mel Foster,Gary W. Gallagher
ISBN13: 978-1452653105
Title: The Union War
Format: lrf rtf lrf lit
ePUB size: 1511 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (June 22, 2011)

The Union War by Mel Foster,Gary W. Gallagher



The Union War. 0 5 Author: Gary W. Gallagher Narrator: Mel Foster. Even one hundred and fifty years later, we are haunted by the Civil War-by its division, its bloodshed, and perhaps, above all, by its origins. Today, many believe that the war was fought over slavery. This answer satisfies our contemporary sense of justice, but as Gary W. Gallagher shows in this brilliant revisionist history, it is an anachronistic judgment. In a searing analysis of the Civil War North as revealed in contemporary letters, diaries, and documents, Gallagher demonstrates that what motivated the.

Written by Gary W. Gallagher, Audiobook narrated by Mel Foster. Brimming with insights, eloquent in argument, and filled with new evidence from the men who fought for the Union, this revisionist history will cause readers to rethink many of the now-standard Civil War interpretations. Gallagher. Narrated by Mel Foster. Once we understand the centrality of union, we can in turn appreciate the force that made Northern victory possible: the citizen-soldier. Gallagher reveals how the massive volunteer army of the North fought to confirm American exceptionalism by salvaging the Union. Contemporary concerns have distorted the reality of nineteenth-century Americans, who embraced emancipation primarily to punish secessionists and remove slavery as a future threat to union-goals that emerged in the process of war. As Gallagher recovers why and how the Civil War was fought, we gain a more honest understanding of why. The Union War - Gary W.

Union War. Harvard University.

The Civil War, Gallagher announces at the outset, was a war for Union that also killed slavery. Emancipation was an outcome (an astounding outcome, Lincoln remarked in his second Inaugural Address) but, Gallagher insists, it always took a back seat to the paramount goal of saving the Union

The Union War. Gary W. Gallagher Author Mel Foster Narrator (2011). Cold Harbor to the Crater. Military Campaigns of the Civil War (Series). Becoming Confederates. Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures (Series). Gallagher Author Sarah Gardner Other (2013). Causes Won, Lost and Forgotten. Gallagher Author Robert Pavlovich Narrator (2008). Margaret E. Wagner Author Library of Congress Author (2011)  .

The Union War reaffirms Gary Gallagher’s reputation as one of the most astute and provocative writers on the American Civil War. This work places the Union at the heart of the war but also argues for the central role of armies and soldiers in understanding how the goals of reunion and emancipation were finally realized. With clarity and verve, Gallagher deals with large questions in an unfailingly profound way. -George C. Rable, author of God’s Almost Chosen Peoples.

In opposition to Gary Gallagher’s simplistic Union-centric explanation for why the federal government went to war with the seceded states, James Oakes emphatically states that the Republican party and the policies of the United States government before, during, and immediately after the Civil War were consistently and primarily committed to the destruction of slavery throughout all of the United States. An excellent history book examining the 1860's idea of "Union" and what motivated the northern soldiers to enlist. This book examines the historiography of the Union war idea and draws heavily from primary sources to explain the attitudes and feelings of the mid-19th Century. If you want to know truth about the northern men's motivation for enlisting and their feelings throughout the war, this is a great resource.

Even one hundred and fifty years later, we are haunted by the Civil War-by its division, its bloodshed, and perhaps, above all, by its origins. Even one hundred and fifty years later, we are haunted by the Civil War by its division, its bloodshed, and perhaps, above all, by its origins.

Even one hundred and fifty years later, we are haunted by the Civil War-by its division, its bloodshed, and perhaps, above all, by its origins. Today, many believe that the war was fought over slavery. This answer satisfies our contemporary sense of justice, but as Gary W. Gallagher shows in this brilliant revisionist history, it is an anachronistic judgment.In a searing analysis of the Civil War North as revealed in contemporary letters, diaries, and documents, Gallagher demonstrates that what motivated the North to go to war and persist in an increasingly bloody effort was primarily preservation of the Union. Devotion to the Union bonded nineteenth-century Americans in the North and West against a slaveholding aristocracy in the South and a Europe that seemed destined for oligarchy. Northerners believed they were fighting to save the republic, and with it the world's best hope for democracy.Once we understand the centrality of union, we can in turn appreciate the force that made Northern victory possible: the citizen-soldier. Gallagher reveals how the massive volunteer army of the North fought to confirm American exceptionalism by salvaging the Union. Contemporary concerns have distorted the reality of nineteenth-century Americans, who embraced emancipation primarily to punish secessionists and remove slavery as a future threat to union-goals that emerged in the process of war. As Gallagher recovers why and how the Civil War was fought, we gain a more honest understanding of why and how it was won.
Reviews: 7
Xava
One key question that animates much thinking about the Civil War: Why did the soldiers, facing miserable conditions and fighting horrific battles leaving so many dead and disfigured, fight? Why did they persevere? In this book the question examine answers from the union side. The title "Union War" provides the answer.

Gary Gallagher is an eminent historian of the Civil War. Thus, his analysis is worth thinking about. In some senses, the book begins with a straw man attack, as he notes questions about the popular view that the Civil War was about Union troops fighting for the end of slavery and emancipation. Frankly, that is hardly a majority view. But it does serve to juxtapose Gallagher's answers against that view. He contends that the northern troops fought for union.

Gallagher uses many sources to make his case, including the artifacts of the soldiers themselves, such as letters and diaries. Three questions are at the fore in this work (Page 5): "What did the war for Union mean in mid-nineteenth century America? How and why did emancipation come to be part of the war for Union? How did armies of citizen-soldiers figure in conceptions of the war, the process of emancipation, and the shaping of national sentiment?"

The book begins with the "Grand Review" of 1865, when the armies of East and West marched down the streets of Washington D. C. Then, the book goes back in time to explore answers to the questions noted above.

Gallagher sensitively uses the information at his disposal to address these. In the end, a satisfactory volume.
Wnex
not why it started. Gary Gallagher, professor at the University of Virginia and Penn State and noted Civil War historian, has written a short book on "why" the northern soldiers fought their southern brethren. Conventional wisdom aside - that it was the question of slavery and the righteousness of the practice - Gallagher says the real reason was the idea of "union".

Many of the soldiers and lawmakers had fathers and grandfathers who had fought the British for Independence and the sense of "Union" of the "United States of America". To these men, "preserving" the Union was as important as their forefathers having attained it in the first place. Look at the word "union" and the phrase "the Union". Both mean virtually the same thing but only one applies to a specific entity. And these men were willing to die for that "union".

But what about slavery and the idea of the North fighting to emancipate the slaves? The South may have begun with war with the yell of "states' rights" but the idea of fighting to keep those rights - including the practice of slavery - was a southern ideal. Gallagher states that while slavery was not well regarded in the north, he didn't feel it was the reason the north fought. He quotes Abraham Lincoln - on page 50 - of the three practicalities he had in freeing the slaves in the context of fighting and winning the war.

Gallagher also writes about those thousands of immigrants who joined native-born Americans in the northern armies. What were they fighting for? Again, "union" and the idea of a country that was seen in Europe as a "bright spot" among nations. Many countries - France, the German States, the Austria/Hungary - had weathered uprisings in 1848 by citizens protesting traditional rule. Many of these people emigrated to the US and saw this country - this "union" - as something worth fighting for and preserving.

Gary Gallagher is an elegant writer of history. He doesn't try to "pad" his text to make the book longer; he presents his ideas and supports them. Very good book.
Zyniam
I read this book to help me understand why my GG grandfather, Eseck H. Dyer, fought in the Civil war. When Eseck enlisted in August, 1862 he was 46 years old, had a farm near Whitehouse, Ohio, and was raising 4 kids. That is not the profile of most volunteer soldiers. Did the cause of freeing the slaves really mean that much to him? He had probably never seen a slave in person. Gallagher's book helped me understand that Eseck was probably more interested in preserving the union and honoring his ancestors who helped create it than in freeing the slaves.

Gallagher makes good use of newspaper and diary sources to understand the motivations of the volunteer soldiers. Also, very convincingly, he reviews some of the many town square monuments erected all over the north to honor the soldiers; they all talk about saving the Union, not freeing the slaves. Freeing the slaves was a military tactic, not a political goal. We all know, I hope, that the Emancipation Proclamation did not free all the slaves, only the ones in the south. Four slave states were fighting for the Union and they got to keep their slaves. In true Orwellian fashion, history has been re-written to make freeing the slaves the centerpiece in the public mind. Not that there is anything wrong with freeing the slaves, but I prefer my history to be accurate.

Eseck survived the war although he was left for dead on the battlefield at Fort Wagner where he served, incidentally, with a unit composed mostly of black Union soldiers. He was deaf and disabled for the rest of his life, but he did manage to father yet another kid on his return. Now I think I understand why he went. His grandfather, Stephen Dyer, had fought in the American Revolution and Eseck must have been motivated to preserve the Union that came from that war. Also, Eseck must have known his grandfather because Stephen lived to be 95 and Eseck would have been 30 when he died.

So, I thank Mr. Gallagher for helping with a family mystery.