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ISBN:1570033390
Author: Mayer
ISBN13: 978-1570033391
Title: Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution (Non Series)
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ePUB size: 1788 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of South Carolina Press; Reprint edition (August 1, 1999)
Pages: 321

Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution (Non Series) by Mayer



FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Belonging to the Army reveals the identity and importance of the civilians now referred to as camp followers. Camp followers-Yes there were some who were that BUT women played a substantial role in the Revolution. At home they managed the household duties and raised children.

Corporate Name: United States. Continental Army Military life. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Mike said: Armies consist of much more than just soldiers, a fact which is easily forgotten  . While admitting that many camp followers were motivated from economic or material reasons, Mayer does for the most part assume a level of American nationalism. While many were drawn to the army for personal concerns, The Continental Community. needed to realize those beliefs. Army service attracted people intent on American independence and willing to achieve that end by military means.

The American Revolution took place after Britain put in place the seven Coercive, or Intolerable Acts, in the colonies. Americans responded by forming the Continental Congress and going to war with the British. Even though these "non-consumption boycotts" depended on national policy (formulated by men), it was women who enacted them in the household spheres in which they reigned. Mayer, Holly A. (1999). Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution. Univ of South Carolina Press.

18th century (4) American History (2) American Revolution (7) army (3) camp follower (3) colonial history (1) commerce (2) community (1) Cultural and Social Histories (1) culture (1) eclectic (1) gender (2) gender roles (2) history (8) home front (1) military (2) military history (5) non-fiction (4) prostitution (2) read (1) Revolutionary War (5) social history (1) social life (2) Soldier. Life (2) US (2) USA (1) women (4) women's history (1) women's studies (3) work (1). ▾LibraryThing Recommendations. Member recommendations.

Belonging to the Army reveals the identity and importance of the civilians now referred to as camp followers, whom Holly A. Mayer calls the forgotten revolutionaries of the War for American Independence. These merchants, contractors, family members, servants, government officers, and military employees provided necessary supplies, services, and emotional support to the troops of the Continental Army.

Female Followers of the Armies of the American Revolution: A Reading ListJohn U. Rees This is not a comprehensive list, nor is it intended. 1756 Holly Mayer, From Forts to Families: Following the Army into Western Pennsylvania, 1758- 1766. The Pennsylvania Magazine of History andBiography 130 (January 2006): 5-43. ng-the-Army- vania-1758-1766 Letter of Martha May, an Army wife, to Col Henry Bouquet, 4 June 1758, Two Hundred Years in Cumberland County (Carlisle, PA: Hamilton Library, 1951), 25. Mayer describes their activities and demonstrates how they made encampments livable communities and played a fundamental role in the survival and ultimate success of the Continental Army. Instead the civilians' assimilation gave an expansive meaning to the term "belonging to the army. Belonging to the Army.

There are no statistics on camp followers for the colonial wars, but about 20,000 women had paid positions with the American troops at some point during the American Revolution. Around 2,000 women traveled with Burgoyne's 7,200 troops on the 1777 invasion of New York. Two years later, 1,200 civilians, mostly wives and children, marched with John Sullivan's army from Pennsylvania into New York. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996. Eighteenth-Century American Women in Peace and War: The Case of the Loyalists.

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Belonging to the Army reveals the identity and importance of the civilians now referred to as camp followers, whom Holly A. Mayer calls the forgotten revolutionaries of the War for American Independence. These merchants, contractors, family members, servants, government officers, and military employees provided necessary supplies, services, and emotional support to the troops of the Continental Army. Mayer describes their activities and demonstrates how they made encampments livable communities and played a fundamental role in the survival and ultimate success of the Continental Army. She also considers how the army wanted to be rid of the followers but were unsuccessful because of the civilians' essential support functions and determination to make camps into communities. Instead the civilians' assimilation gave an expansive meaning to the term "belonging to the army
Reviews: 7
რฉςh
This will educate the reader about the realities of the difficult choices for women during the American Revolution. Their safety and their lives depended on whether they could travel with the army. Their existence was as difficult and in some ways more so than for the soldiers. A must read to appreciate what was endured by these ordinary women who endured conditions and a heart wrenching existence with constant dangers not only to themselves, but to their children and infants. Women would go out during battles to get clothing off dead soldiers to have clothing for themselves and their children. They sometimes fought alongside the men, seeing their own husbands killed in unimaginable ways.
roternow
An informative look into a little-understood subject. Belonging to the Army goes beyond the myth and legend to explore the critical role of those members of the Army Community who did not tote muskets or service cannon...or at least not most of the time. While it can get a little dry at times, I would strongly recommend this to anyone trying to get a better understanding of how the Continental Army worked behind the scenes and at the company level.
Shezokha
A very different look at the Continental Army from a very unknown aspect that was also an important component of the struggle to win our independence. A very interesting read.
Vushura
Excellent book. No problem with the transaction.
Malaunitly
No Comment
Tegore
Camp followers--Yes there were some who were that BUT women played a substantial role in the Revolution. At home they managed the household duties and raised children. With the Army they served as nurses, as domestics, as laundrey women and traveled with their soldier husbands to keep families together and endured the same hardships as the men
Opilar
Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution by Holly A. Mayer

This book is valuable in that it helps to provide a fuller, more accurate picture of what the Continental Army and Colonial America was like.

When you read primary source documents you find casual allusions to others with the army but who do not wear the uniform. As the old axiom goes, "amateurs study tactics and experts study logistics so goes much of the story of this book. The Continental Army was very much a product of its own time. As such many of the logistical and what we now call service and support work was done not by soldiers but by contractors and others. The rational being that the government was willing to pay a contractor more money on salary or contract if it freed up another soldier to serve in the front line. A similar rational drives the current military today as it seeks to maximize its troop strength on the tip of the spear and fill out the tail with contracts.

The service and support tasks done by contract or by others varied from driving wagons, sewing and mending clothing and equipment, to laundry, nursing and medical care to servants and in many cases to military staffs themselves. Quite opposite of the German tradition of wanting to serve on a staff and take part in sculpting operations the Continental Officer held staff jobs in low esteem and wanted rather to be in the thick of the fight.

Previously I mentioned contractors and others. Contractors were pretty much similar to what we have now. In fact there were even companies who specialized in military contracting as we have now. Other contracts were done by individuals bidding directly, or through the Congress or even through states. The logistics situation, to include manpower procurement, was complex and very untidy.

The others I mentioned are those people who did not have a formal contract with obligations and rights but rather who still preformed similar functions sometimes with rations or small piece pay or for no pay at all. These others included women who accompanied the troops, most often wives, volunteers, and slaves.

The role of women proved far more interesting then most historians let on. Very few were prostitutes thought this is the common imagery. Simply put being a camp following prostitute was stupid as Continental soldiers were rarely paid. Most of the women were wives of poorer soldiers who simply had no place else to go and often brought their children along as well. Typically these women and children were put on the official ration scale of the army at the rate of on one woman per every fifteen soldiers. It was not a free ride though as they were expected to sew, wash, cook, nurse, and follow military regulations as applicable in exchange for their rations.

The story of the use of slaves and free blacks as well as gentlemen volunteers is what really sets this army in its own time frame rather then ours. The notion that much of the staff work and generals aides would be serving as non-military and with out pay is a strange and almost alien concept now.

In total this book is very well researched and it is a needed topic in order to understand military life and operations in the Continental Army. However this author while being a very good historian did not turn in a very easily readable text. The flow of the text is hurkey-jerky with awkward sentence and paragraph construction. It is written more in a Marxist academic style then a good narrative style. This back and forth and restating of certain themes over and over again in different ways makes the book a ponderous and plodding read. In the end it is a valuable addition to our understanding but poorly presented.
To say Camp Follower one immediately thinks of the harlots that followed armies through out history.

This book pretty much puts a stop to that image though such women did exist most women who followed the soldiers in the field were anything but. In addition it covers all others who served teh armies in the field in a supporting role.

Though it covers only the American armies of the revolution it can pretry much serve to enlightenthe reader about those of other armies of the times as well.

Nicely written. Well organized. Easy to read.

A must read for anyone interested in the history of warfare.