» » Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
Download Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley epub book
ISBN:0820320331
Author: David Williams
ISBN13: 978-0820320335
Title: Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley
Format: lrf doc lit mobi
ePUB size: 1228 kb
FB2 size: 1758 kb
DJVU size: 1840 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Georgia Press; 1st edition (January 1, 1999)
Pages: 328

Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley by David Williams



Includes bibliographical references and index. Geographic Name: Chattahoochee River Valley History 19th century. Geographic Name: Georgia History Civil War, 1861-1865 Social aspects. United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Social aspects. Corporate Name: Historic Chattahoochee Commission. Download Rich man's war : class, caste, and Confederate defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley David Williams. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags

In Rich Man's War historian David Williams focuses on the Civil War experience of people in the Chattahoochee River Valley of Georgia and Alabama to illustrate how the exploitation of enslaved blacks and poor whites by a planter oligarchy generated overwhelming class conflict across the South, eventually leading to Confederate defeat.

DAVID WILLIAMS I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era. Book & Movie Discussion Tent. Replies: 126. Captain David Williams, Company K (the "Holly Shelter Volunteers"), 3rd Regiment . Started by CSA Today. Replies: 20. General History Discussion. DAVID WILLIAMS I Freed Myself: African American Self-Emancipation in the Civil War Era. Started by CMWinkler. Replies: 1. WILLIAMS, David Henry USA. Started by Mark Wadsworth.

In "Rich Man's War" historian David Williams focuses on the Civil War experience of people in the Chattahoochee River Valley of Georgia and Alabama to illustrate how the exploitation of enslaved blacks and poor whites by a planter oligarchy generated overwhelming class conflict across the South, eventually leading to Confederate defeat.

Operation Barbarossa And Germany's Defeat in The East. Operation Barbarossa And Germany's Defeat in The East. Operation Barbarossa and Germany's Defeat in the East eBooks & eLearning. Posted by First1 at Aug. 2, 2017. Its failure was a key turning point of the Second World War. The operation was planned as a Blitzkrieg to win Germany its Lebensraum in the east, and the summer of 1941 is well-known for the German army's unprecedented victories and advances. Stopped at Stalingrad: Luftwaffe and Hitler's Defeat in the East, 1942-43 (repost) eBooks & eLearning. Posted by arundhati at Nov. 12, 2018. Joel Hayward, "Stopped at Stalingrad: Luftwaffe and Hitler's Defeat in the East, 1942-43" 1998 ISBN-10: 0700608761, 0700611460 398 pages PDF 134 MB. Details.

Rich Man’s War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998. In keeping within the rubric of New Military History, David Williams’s Rich Man’s War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley offers a close examination of the role of class within the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Williams scrutinizes issues of class within the lower Chattahoochee Valley running through Georgia and Alabama.

David Williams, Rich Man's War: Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998). Civil War on the Chattahoochee River. New Georgia Encyclopedia.

The Lower Chattahoochee River Valley region has one of the richest traditions of blues music in America; but, apart from long-time residents of the region and a handful of blues afficianados, the blues legacy of the Lower Chattahoochee Valley is largely ignored. That's probably due to the fact that.

The Chattahoochee Valley Libraries (CVL) are a consortium of public libraries serving the Greater Columbus Area of Georgia. The library system consists of seven branches over four counties, Muscogee, Chattahoochee, Marion, and Stewart, Georgia. The headquarters of the library system is the Columbus Public Library located in the county seat Columbus, Georgia.

Details about Plain Folk in a Rich Man's War: "A significant voice in a significant debate. full of marvelous quotes. -William W. Freehling, University of Kentucky"Shows clearly that the Solid South was not solid at all demonstrates that the war encompassed much more than military strategy and tactics. it was fought at home as well as on the battlefield. -Wayne K. Durrill, University of CincinnatiThis compelling and engaging book sheds. This work stresses more forcefully than any before it that plain folk in the Deep South were far from united behind the Confederate war effort.

In Rich Man's War historian David Williams focuses on the Civil War experience of people in the Chattahoochee River Valley of Georgia and Alabama to illustrate how the exploitation of enslaved blacks and poor whites by a planter oligarchy generated overwhelming class conflict across the South, eventually leading to Confederate defeat.

This conflict was so clearly highlighted by the perception that the Civil War was "a rich man's war and a poor man's fight" that growing numbers of oppressed whites and blacks openly rebelled against Confederate authority, undermining the fight for independence. After the war, however, the upper classes encouraged enmity between freedpeople and poor whites to prevent a class revolution. Trapped by racism and poverty, the poor remained in virtual economic slavery, still dominated by an almost unchanged planter elite.

The publication of this book was supported by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission.

Reviews: 3
tamada
My family lived near Eufaula, Alabama at the start of the Civil War. My 5th ggrandfather and his eldest son "enlisted" at the start of the war. My 4th ggrandfather came of age and joined about a year and a half before the war's end. His brother had been captured at Gettysburg and died/was killed at Fort Delaware by the time he was reunited with his dad.

I say his brother died and or was killed because of conflicting reports from reading "The war between the Union and the Confederacy" which was written by Col. William C. Oates (who commanded my family members in the 15th Alabama Infantry), and a report I received from the Department of Veteran Affairs.

Oates states he was killed by another prisoner, and the VA says he died of something like pneumonia. Two apparently expert resources (the government, and Oates who later became a state governor and a member of the House of Representatives *also government IMHO*) conflicting each other.

The reason I'm including all this TMI is to illustrate the need for more research on "social polarizing" subjects from the standpoint of the socioeconomic affects at play. How else can we as a society make any sense of (or truthfully say we have any kind of understanding on) the positions of the North and the South, without digging into the social norms and values that drove the common man? Round out our popular history lessons and help us fill in the gaps!

The truth on what happened to my great uncle will likely never be learned. But there is so very much more we can learn, than what is typically spoken of or taught on this event that still reverberates through our culture today. Who knows, maybe with enough open mindedness and desire to find the truth it may be that we can finally put aside our (sometimes hidden) differences and fully become American brothers and sisters?

You have my heartfelt thanks Dr. Williams, I look forward to reading more of your titles!
Snowskin
David tells a story of real people; with real problems; desparately trying to survive in a world turned upside down. This work is full of truth. Outlining the fact that merely 1/3 of the South's population really supported the War. And hinting at what the outcome might have been; had the local gentry fostered a policy of inclusion, rather than that of slavery, segregation, and the culture of the elite. This is a MUST read for anyone interested in the cultural evolution of the New South. And an eye opening journey into our own past; redefining what it truely means to be "Southern".
Dodo
This book would be a joke if it were not so sadly typical of what passes for historic analysis on the part of academia today. The reader has to go no further than the name Benning to appreicate the complete disregard the author has for an unbiased analysis of history and how committed he is to promulgating the generally Marxist world view harbored by so many in his profession.
The casual readear would assume that Henry Lewis Benning was precisely the schemeing politician/lawyer hypocritically playing the race card to advance his own interests while happily seeing "poor" men marching off to the killing fields which Williams portrays him to be (this being the author's central thesis). Nowhere in the text is it pointed out, in what purports to be a Civil War history of this region, that Benning served for four years in the Army of Northern Virginia,leading a brigade in some of the most violent battles of that war. He was wounded at Knoxville yet returned to serve in the trenches at Petersburg and ended his career in the CSA at Appomatox. An even handed analysis of why men such as Benning sacrificed so much would have been very enlightening. But Williams, of course, has no time for such trivialities. He has a mission to accomplish, a career to establish. He has no time for truth.