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Download Blood Feud: The Hatfields And The Mccoys: The Epic Story Of Murder And Vengeance (2012) epub book
ISBN:0762782250
Author: Lisa Alther
ISBN13: 978-0762782253
Title: Blood Feud: The Hatfields And The Mccoys: The Epic Story Of Murder And Vengeance (2012)
Format: azw mobi docx lrf
ePUB size: 1676 kb
FB2 size: 1574 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Lyons Press; fifth printing edition (February 5, 2013)
Pages: 304

Blood Feud: The Hatfields And The Mccoys: The Epic Story Of Murder And Vengeance (2012) by Lisa Alther



America's most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Harmon McCoy, a Union soldier, by a Confederate Hatfield. But Southern grudges run long and deep. More than a decade later tempers flared over stolen hogs. This accusation triggered years of bloody violence and retribution that led to a tragic Romeo-and-Juliet interlude, a Supreme Court ruling, and a public hanging. Its legend continues to have an enormous impact on the popular imagination and the people of the region.

America’s most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Harmon McCoy, a Union soldier, by a Confederate Hatfield relative. This accusation triggered years of bloody violence and retribution that led to a tragic Romeo-and-Juliet interlude, a Supreme Court ruling, and Kentucky’s last public hanging. Here is a fascinating new look at the infamous story of the Hatfields and the McCoys. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History.

Like most people I had a limited awareness of the story of the Hatfields and the McCoys before reading this book. Lisa Alther puts her storytelling abilities to good use to expand upon the limited evidence that exists about the feud. For this story was one in which many of the participants were near-illiterates at best and the closest chroniclers were often tainted by family connections to one or the other side in the feud

Its legend continues to have an enormous impact on the popular imagination and the people of the region. Visit my blog for more eBooks and Audiobooks RSS. Download from icerbox.

America’s most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Union McCoy soldier by a Confederate relative of Devil Anse Hatfield. More than a decade later, Ranel McCoy accused a Hatfield of stealing one of his hogs, triggering years of violence and retribution, including a Romeo-and-Juliet interlude that eventually led to the death of one of McCoy’s daughters. In a drunken brawl, three of McCoy’s sons killed Devil Anse Hatfield’s younger brother. Exacting vigilante revenge, a group of Hatfields tied them up and shot them dead

Author:, Date: 25 Aug 2012, Views: 2012 304 Pages ISBN: 0762779187 EPUB 6 MB. America��s most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Harmon McCoy, a Union soldier, by a Confederate Hatfield relative. Blood Feud: The Hatfields and the McCoys: The Epic Story of Murder and Vengeance.

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The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival. Lords of the Sea: The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy. Blood Feud by Kimberly Zant New Concepts Publishing ww. Blood Feud.

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com Product Description (ISBN 0762779187, Hardcover). America's most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Harmon McCoy, a Union soldier, by a Confederate Hatfield. A fascinating new look at the infamous story of the Hatfields and the McCoys and their blood feud that began in 1865 with the murder of Harmon McCoy, a Union soldier, by a Confederate Hatfield relative. see all 3 descriptions.

America’s most notorious family feud began in 1865 with the murder of a Union McCoy soldier by a Confederate Hatfield relative of "Devil Anse" Hatfield. More than a decade later, Ranel McCoy accused a Hatfield cousin of stealing one of his hogs, triggering years of violence and retribution, including a Romeo-and-Juliet interlude that eventually led to the death of one of McCoy’s daughters. In a drunken brawl, three of McCoy's sons killed Devil Anse Hatfield’s younger brother. Exacting vigilante vengeance, a group of Hatfields tied them up and shot them dead. McCoy posses hijacked part of the Hatfield firing squad across state lines to stand trial, while those still free burned down Ranel McCoy’s cabin and shot two of his children in a botched attempt to suppress the posses. Legal wrangling ensued until the US Supreme Court ruled that Kentucky could try the captured West Virginian Hatfields. Seven went to prison, and one, mentally disabled, yelled, “The Hatfields made me do it!” as he was hanged. But the feud didn’t end there. Its legend continues to have an enormous impact on the popular imagination and the region. With a charming voice, a wonderfully dry sense of humor, and an abiding gift for spinning a yarn, bestselling author Lisa Alther makes an impartial, comprehensive, and compelling investigation of what happened, masterfully setting the feud in its historical and cultural contexts, digging deep into the many causes and explanations of the fighting, and revealing surprising alliances and entanglements. Here is a fascinating new look at the infamous Hatfield-McCoy feud.
Reviews: 7
BlessСhild
In the interest of full disclosure, I will state up front that I am the author of a book on the same subject, "The Hatfields and McCoys after Kevin Costner: Rescuing History."

I was born and raised on Blackberry Creek, a mile from where the Election Day, 1882 events occurred.

Directly descended from Preacher Anderson Hatfield and Uriah McCoy, I knew many people when I was growing up during the late 1940's and 1950's who remembered the actual events of the 1880's.

I began researching the records in Pikeville, Logan, Charleston and Frankfort as a college student fifty-five years ago. I was too busy making a living to write a book on the feud, but the 2012 movie, followed by the books by Alther and King changed that. This book by Ms. Alther was the initial motivation for my book, and the one by Dean King which followed made my book an absolute necessity.

Ms. Alther is a competent novelist, and, had she written a novel based on the characters in the feud story, I would have remained silent. But she sells the book as non-fiction, and has reviews from prestigious sources like the Wall Street Journal lauding her as "an expert on the subject of the feud."

The three editorial reviews following that of the Journal all say that Alther's book is "well researched," or "exhaustively researched."

This book is a conglomeration of previously spun tall tales, spiced with some of the writer's own inventions. I will cite only one of dozens of this author's whoppers to illustrate:

Alther writes, on page 35: "Ranel McCoy did eventually retaliate, though, however blandly. Fifteen months after Harmon's death, in April, 1866, he charged Devil Anse Hatfield with stealing a horse from his farm in 1864."

Although one would expect the writer of a "well researched book," who is an "expert on the feud," to cite the case, Alther does no such thing, simply because no such case was ever filed. The complete index of the cases filed with either a Hatfield or a McCoy as the moving party in Pike Circuit Court for the period can be seen at: http://blueridgecountry.com/blogging/hatfields-mccoys-revisited-blog/hatfields-mccoys-revisited-week-3-tom-dotson/#ixzz36SA3IEQn
While several post-Civil war Pike County cases were suits for restitution for items stolen by marauding guerrilla bands during the war, no such suit ever involved any Hatfield vs any McCoy, much less Devil Anse and Randolph.

Alther compounds her offense by continuing on the next page with: ""Ranel McCoy and Devil Anse Hatfield filed several similar civil suits against each other in the years following." Again, she gives no citation, because no such cases were ever filed.

All of this was concocted by the writer to show a decades-long conflict between the two families, thus justifying her title, "Blood feud." It is categorically false, as anyone looking at the case index can plainly see.

This book is a story--and a pretty good one--but it is NOT the story of the Hatfields and the McCoys. It is fiction.
MilsoN
I have read many accounts on this famous feud so I read through the first half of the book with great interest. I knew most of the characters but if this was my first read on the subject, I would have a hard time keeping them straight mostly because the author, highly biased, saw fit to inject personal feelings towards people she never met. Towards the end, the of dread and self confessed therapy sessions about her fears brought about by being related to ancestors 3-4 generations prior just bugged me. Stop being victims people. History teaches us how not to repeat the bad stuff. Good Lord, 150 years is just too long to carry all that guilt. Tons of stuff has happened since then. MOVE ON.
Camper
I actually quit reading this and watched the recent series instead. There are so many names spanning several generations it's almost impossible to keep then all straight. Plus a lot of the stories seem to be just folklore pissed on through the generations. As the author frequently admits there were no witnesses and no survivors to recount these tales. So in other words he admits they could be made up. Or at the end of a chapter he'll say the other family argues that this never happened. Kind of pointless and confusing in my opinion.
PC-rider
Not hard to figure which family the author is decended from...then she goes on to inject her own political/social opinions to which I really didnt care to read...I was hoping I was buying an informative unbiased book on this subject,But what I got was DISAPPOINTING,BIAS,injected with personal social views,,,,,Hey AMAZON,,,Can I get my money back????
Efmprof
Lisa Alther is an excellent storyteller. This is evidenced by her several successful novels. It is her storytelling ability that makes Blood Feud a pleasure to read. Notably, the subtitle for the book includes the words "Epic Story" as a sign of what the reader should expect. The epic story is just that although it takes less than half the book to tell it. After the conclusion of the story of the feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys the book continues to expand upon the feud. There is a short discussion of the subsequent history of the two families followed by stories of similar feuds that, while sometimes even more violent, did not receive the attention given to the Hatfields and the McCoys. The author does not end there but continues with some psychologizing about the possible reasons for the violent behavior of these particular clans and adds a chapter on her personal family history that is indirectly connected to the main story.
Like most people I had a limited awareness of the story of the Hatfields and the McCoys before reading this book. In it I learned about many interesting details throughout the story that suggested this was a complex saga rather than a simple tale of revenge. Lisa Alther puts her storytelling abilities to good use to expand upon the limited evidence that exists about the feud. For this story was one in which many of the participants were near-illiterates at best and the closest chroniclers were often tainted by family connections to one or the other side in the feud. The author sorts this out in a way that provides some clarity; however it does not raise the storytelling to the level of history. The additional material contains interesting speculation about the sources and psychology of the feud. But this material also demonstrates the authors own bias from her vantage point in the twenty-first century. The result is a great story with added commentary that, for this reader, raised my skepticism about the apparent objectivity of the author. Perhaps that is a good thing for anyone reading fictional non-fiction.