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ISBN:0807124273
Author: Paul E. Hoffman
ISBN13: 978-0807124277
Title: The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535--1585: Precedent, Patrimonialism, and Royal Parsimony
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ePUB size: 1568 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: LSU Press; Edition Unstated edition (March 1, 1999)
Pages: 384

The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535--1585: Precedent, Patrimonialism, and Royal Parsimony by Paul E. Hoffman



On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Spanish crown and the defense of the Caribbean, 1535-1585 : precedent, patrimonialism, and royal parsimony, Paul E. Hoffman.

Paul Hoffman looks behind the legend to discover the reality of what the Spanish crown was doing to defend its empire against raiders such as Drake. Using quantitative as well as literary data on the costs, t Because of the legendary exploits of Sir Francis Drake, most people have heard of the sixteenth-century conflicts between the English and the Spanish in the New World. Paul Hoffman looks behind the legend to discover the reality of what the Spanish crown was doing to defend its empire against raiders such as Drake. Assuming the reader can tolerate the raw data and statistical analysis, the book offers a very unique picture of the Caribbean 1535-1585, the year before Drake's famous and destructive raid. What makes this study so unique is that it strongly argues that the Spanish could, and did, defend its Caribbean colonies during the early stages of the buccaneer invasions. Using quantitative as well as literary data on the costs. Paul E. Hoffman, professor of history at Louisiana State University, is the author or co-author of six books on colonial Latin American history, including Florida’s Frontiers, winner of the Gulf South Historical Association Book Award, and The Last Voyage of El Nuevo Constante: The Wreck and Recovery of an Eighteenth-Century Spanish Ship off the Louisiana Coast.

Paul E. Hoffman, The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535–1585. Precedent, Patrimonialism and Royal Parsimony. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London, 1980. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535-1585 : Precedent, Patrimonialism and Royal Parsimony. Because of the legendary exploits of Sir Francis Drake, most people have heard of the sixteenth-century conflicts between the English and the Spanish in the New World.

The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535-1585: Precedent, Patrimonialism, and Royal Parsimony, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1980. Spain and the Roanoke Voyages (booklet), America's Four Hundredth Anniversary Committee, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources (Raleigh, NC), 1987. Hoffman is the author, with Charles E. Pearson, of The Last Voyage of El Nuevo Constante: The Wreck and Recovery of an Eighteenth-Century Spanish Ship off the Louisiana Coast. The ship was one of a fleet of ships that set sail in August, 1776. The ship was wrecked during a hurricane, and what remained washed up off shore on the coast of southwestern Louisiana.

In The Spanish Crown, Hoffman seeks to describe these strategies across four distinct time periods and through the influence of eight individual factors. The economic wisdom of this royal parsimony, and the prudence of Núñez Vela, was revealed in the mid-1560s, when the crown deviated from its stingy policies after the appearance of two French colonies in Florida. One of these colonies was at Santa Elena (1562) and the other was at Fort Caroline (1564). Between 1535 and 1585, the Spanish crown lived in palpable fear of large-scale invasions from giant fleets like that of Cartier-Roberval, Count Louis of Nassau, and Sir Francis Drake. However, the reality was something very different: thirty to forty ships of 100 men or less, half of them corsairs and half of them smugglers, operated in the Indies on an annual basis.

1535 Leads the Spanish galleys in the campaign of Charles V against Tunis. 1536 Captures the flagship of the Argelian navy, that among French ships, was about to pillage the Spanish coasts. General captain of the Ocean Sea)  . Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean 1535-1585: Precedent, Patrimonialism, and Royal Parsimony Louisiana State University Press (June 1980).

The Spanish Crown and the Defense of the Caribbean, 1535–1585: Precedent, Patrimonialism and Royal Parsimony, Baton Rouge. Fortifications and the End of the Sienese State’, History, 62, 372–87. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. The Navy of Suleyman the Magnificent’, Archivum Ottomanicum, 6, 211–82.

Because of the legendary exploits of Sir Francis Drake, most people have heard of the sixteenth-century conflicts between the English and the Spanish in the New World. Paul Hoffman looks behind the legend to discover the reality of what the Spanish crown was doing to defend its empire against raiders such as Drake.

Using quantitative as well as literary data on the costs, types, and locations of defenses and on the locations and types of corsair incidents, Hoffman documents the evolution of s system of defenses that he believes was adequate for confronting the violence of the French and English in the years before 1586. He suggests that the size of Drake’s expedition of 1586 was a response to this system and in turn caused the Spanish to abandon the system in favor of one that concentrated on the defense of the major towns and trade routes.

Besides telling the complex story of how the Spanish built forts, installed garrisons and artillery, and patrolled the Caribbean, Hoffman discusses the ways in which the political system of the empire shaped decisions on defenses. Contrary to what many have believed, Hoffman concludes, Spain exhibited neither military failure nor timidity in its defense of hits interest in the New World. Sharing the results of his meticulous research about the Spanish Caribbean, Paul Hoffman examines an important period that legend has obscured.