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ISBN:0970688407
Author: Shirley P. Barnes
ISBN13: 978-0970688408
Title: The War Cradle
Format: azw txt lrf mbr
ePUB size: 1920 kb
FB2 size: 1397 kb
DJVU size: 1960 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: Vintage Pressworks; Special limited ed edition (October 1, 2000)
Pages: 328

The War Cradle by Shirley P. Barnes



The War Cradle/Shirley Peck Barnes Chapter by Chapter Outline PROLOGUE: An overview of the ordinary people who were excited into action, despite an unpopular war; to seek out the abandoned children of Vietnamto give them new life, fresh hope, and find homes for them in the West. CHAPTER I: The Maverick Flight - Millionaire Ed Daly of World Airways attempts to evacuate hund

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Shirley Peck-Barnes describes this gripping event with fervor and compassion, including the crucial events leading up to the evacuation and the treatment of orphans in the United States upon arrival. The War Cradle takes you behind the scenes to the passions and conflicts of the people involved in the day to day operations of a key parent/adoption organization (FCVN) in Vietnam in the late 1970's

The records of the Agency for International Development, the government agency that planned Operation Babylift, are held at the National Archives in Record Group 286. SERIES DESCRIPTIONS. Subject File, 1974‑2005.

Her book chronicles the evacuation of thousands of Vietnamese children to America during the last days of American presence in South Vietnam. How did you become involved in the Vietnam Babylift? Shirley Peck Barnes: Probably my basic human concern for children in trouble. Like most people, I can't read about/or hear of children being hurt. I want to go sock somebody.

Children, Internet Archive Wishlist, Orphanages, Refugees, Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975.

NEW The War Cradle by Shirley P. Barnes.

The cradle of the war. by Woods, Henry Charles, 1881-. Publication date 1918. Topics World War, 1914-1918, World War, 1914-1918, Eastern question (Balkan), Pangermanism. Publisher Boston, Little, Brown, and company. Collection library of congress; americana. Digitizing sponsor Sloan Foundation. Contributor The Library of Congress.

Operation Babylift: Mission Accomplished. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. Ross Meador, hero of Operation Babylift, and Shirley Peck Barnes, author of The War Cradle. 11 January 2012 ·. Joe Hrezo and Phil in Vietnam oprhanage during the 30th.

The War Cradle/Shirley Peck Barnes Chapter by Chapter Outline PROLOGUE: An overview of the ordinary people who were excited into action, despite an unpopular war;. Shirley Peck-Barnes' book is a very graphic (literally too) depiction of what happened in 1975 at the fall of Saigon during Operation Babylift. She captured it all through many interviews with those involved. She offered her own services by letting 600 orphans stay at her facility in Denver without thinking twice!She, fortunately, had the ability to interview those directly involved because of her involvement as secretary with the Department of Defense during the Korean War, which led her to get untold stories during this horrific period. If you want to know the truth, read this.

The War Cradle/Shirley Peck Barnes Chapter by Chapter Outline PROLOGUE: An overview of the ordinary people who were excited into action, despite an unpopular war; to seek out the abandoned children of Vietnam…to give them new life, fresh hope, and find homes for them in the West.

CHAPTER I: The Maverick Flight – Millionaire Ed Daly of World Airways attempts to evacuate hundreds of orphans at his own expense, but is met with opposition from agencies who retaliate against his action-packed rescue of refugees from Danang days earlier. A berated Daly does it again and departs from Saigon with an unauthorized planeload of orphans.

CHAPTER II: The Soldier's Ballad – Described is the American soldier's role in Vietnam as rescuer, surrogate father and Santa Claus. Sometimes the children were his friend…sometimes they were the enemy.

CHAPTER III: Orphanages of Vietnam – Each facility was unique and French nuns who ran them fought a day-to-day struggle for survival.

CHAPTER IV: The Friends of the Children of Vietnam – The Beginning – The organization, FCVN, comes into existence after a Denver physician, Dr. Ted Gleichman, returns from a tour of duty in the Delta. Appalled at the 80% death rate of infants in Vietnam, he organizes the relief effort that eventually develops into an international organization.

CHAPTER V: Mister Ross – Ross Meador, a 19 year-old dropout ventures to Vietnam and finds himself rescuing babies in remote arrears of the Delta. It is a race against death, through VC infested territory, to get his precious cargo back to Saigon's critical care center.

CHAPTER VI: The Plane Crash – President R. Ford implements "Operation Babylift" and sends a C5A Galaxy cargo jet to Saigon to aid in the rescue mission. Tragedy strikes. Soon after takeoff the plane crashes, killing 172 orphans and escorts on board.

CHAPTER VII: The Airlift – Children are hurriedly shuttled to the Philippines, and the exhausted volunteers staff the 46 flights that transport thousands of orphans to the U.S.

CHAPTER VIII: The Last Days – Described are the last days of a hot war during which Ross Meador finds himself struggling to get to the American Embassy. Panic grips all of Saigon and it is late into the night when, as one of the last civilians, Meador is lifted from the embassy rooftop and helicoptered to the aircraft carrier USS Miday.

CHAPTER IX: On Course with Destiny – The author brings herself into the story, revealing how, by chance, she hears a radio newscast and becomes involved in Babylift.

CHAPTER X: Rainbow – The Vietnam War is over and the adoption agencies bring hundreds of children to a Denver healthcare facility. Homesickness erupts; threatening phone calls and political accusations surface with allegations that many of the children are not orphans. After six hectic weeks, during which all the children are sent to homes that welcome them all over the world, the author becomes aware of the predestined course of events. The newly constructed building is on the site of the first Children's Hospital of Denver…that this acre of land becomes a haven for children is distress…twice within a century, is seen as a highly visible act of destiny.

CHAPTER XI: Aftermath – The 25th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War brings a resurgence of interest from the adoptees themselves. Now as adults, many are in search of their roots. Six adoptees share their life experiences. EPILOGUE: When "Operation Babylift" is placed in perspective, it will go down in history as one of the most noteworthy humanitarian gestures of all time. The author discusses how the lessons of Vietnam go unheeded as children are still caught in the crossfire of war in Bosnia, Somalia, the Middle East and hot-spots around the world. But, there is hope… "With the birth of each child comes the message that God has not yet tired of man." (Tagore)

Reviews: 7
Kelerius
Good resource regarding Vietnamese orphans.
Aradwyn
Interesting comprehensive book with photos of the Baby Lift and other personnel and orphans stories.
Malhala
One of my top choices, this book was fascinating, well-researched,
very well organized, well-plotted, and very well written. The subject is
compelling and heartwarming. The author did a lovely job of really making me fall
in love with the characters, and then bringing them through this incredible,
important endeavor. I thought the interviews in the "Aftermath" section were
quite compelling-hearing things in the character's own words added a new
depth to the story. I wish the author had some more great blurbs and
endorsements to help sell this book-it really needs to be taken seriously.
net rider
Please take a minute to read the "Proud Vietnamese" review of The War Cradle on

Amazon.com. This review has set the adoptee's cause back thirty years. For shame, when so much effort has gone into your story being the "voice" for the children of war TODAY. The writer is obviously someone who has either been on the trip or was not selected. The number on the manifest was set by World...I only did what was requested of me and am sorry that

this has reached a public posting level. I want to express my thanks for those of you who took the time to come and speak to me during those exciting/busy few days of "Homeward Bound," and appreciate my part in its conception.... and more importantly, for those who sent me a note afterwards.

I am not discouraged by the writer of "Proud Vietnamese" and will continue my efforts in speaking for the children of war. I have but one question for such critics...."Where is your book?"

Had they read The War Cradle, it was revealed that I spent several years in that part of the world during Korea and have first-hand knowledge of war and children.

It is a common fact that most non-fiction writers have not been through the

experience of which they write...but are objective to bring the facts and story to light.

To the writer of "Proud Vietnamese," you have my utmost sympathy regarding your slanting

views and have discredited your comarades by revealing yourself in such a public venue.

Maturity would have dictated that you take your issues to me personally, whatever they are. If you a were on the trip, a simple "thank you" would have been enough and would have recognized it for what it was....a gift of a lifetime . I am sorry it was not placed in that perspective and that you felt it necessary to discredit me publically.

As for the monetary gains, there are none. I have never been paid a royalty and have given more books away than sold....Until now, I thought it was all worth it. You have placed another perspective on my thirty years invovlement and now place the question that perhaps it was all for " naught." I think not...and hopefully, your counterparts will agree.

Thanks to those who have been supportive. Pocks to those who have not.

Best regards, Shirley
RuTGamer
If ever there was a time to learn from history, that time is now. And if ever there was a book to vividly and compassionately walk us through a piece of history, that book is The War Cradle. Americans may remember Operation Babylift-the impassioned attempt to rescue Amerasian children (those fathered by American GIs) and Vietnamese orphans in the final weeks before Saigon fell to communism in April 1975. Shirley Peck-Barnes writes from her experience as head of the Continental Care Center in Denver, Colorado, the site chosen by Friends of the Children of Vietnam (FCVN) to house and transfer orphans to their new families. Edward J. Daly, president of World Airways,

set the precedent for what would become known as Operation Babylift. Defying military orders and red tape, using his own money,and risking all to fly orphans from war-ravaged South Vietnam. But Peck-Barnes doesn't distinguish between national heroes like Daly and those like Ross Meador, a 19 year old FCVN volunteer. Barnes says in her prologue: "Not all warriors carry guns. Some fight and equally fierce battle without them. This book is about that kind of valor It's about silent heroes. The kind we see every day yet do not recognize since they're not the stuff of legend, art, and adventure." Babylift had its critics, but in defense Barnes gently reminds readers

that one cannot look at Operation Babylift solely as an act of

humanitarianism toward a war-ravaged country, but suggests that especially in the case of the Amerasians, the U.S. had a moral responsibility to these children. The War Cradle will appeal to history lovers, readers of nonfiction, and military buffs, but this is an important book for all. Peck-Barnes' words, in the last pages, already have an eerie air of prophecy. "Books often come into existence to fill a need for awareness and more importantly, to provide answers. The War Cradle is an attempt to open the door on a subject that to date has had minimal exposure...What happened to the children of Vietnam will be forgotten unless the injustice is reverberated and the lessons learned. Sacrifice is wasted if nobody notices. It may be too late already in light of more recent tragedies involving the children of Bosnia, Romania, Somalia and other countries where chaos overtakes reasoning. Undeniably, history is repeating itself before our very eyes."
Fararala
Shirley Peck-Barnes' book is a very graphic (literally too) depiction of what happened in 1975 at the fall of Saigon during Operation Babylift. It was a God-awful time, and things were happening rapidly, without the benefit of thinking things through properly. She captured it all through many interviews with those involved. She offered her own services by letting 600 orphans stay at her facility in Denver without thinking twice!
She, fortunately, had the ability to interview those directly involved because of her involvement as secretary with the Department of Defense during the Korean War, which led her to get untold stories during this horrific period.
If you want to know the truth, read this book.