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ISBN:0803247745
Author: David J. Wishart
ISBN13: 978-0803247741
Title: An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians
Format: lrf lrf azw mbr
ePUB size: 1751 kb
FB2 size: 1360 kb
DJVU size: 1727 kb
Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (March 1, 1995)
Pages: 311

An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians by David J. Wishart



This book tells the story of this century of dispossession. It ends in the final two decades of the nineteenth century with the Indians living poorly on l parcels of land-in Indian Territory and Nebraska. This was not the end of the dispossession, because most of those allot-.

Of all the interactions between American Indians and Euro-Americans, none was as fundamental as the. Historical geographer David J. Wishart tells the story of the dispossession process as it affected the Nebraska ia, Ponca, Omaha, and Pawnee-over the course of the nineteenth century. Working from primary documents, and including American Indian voices, Wishart analyzes the spatial and ecological repercussions of dispossession. Maps give the spatial context of dispossession, showing how Indian societies were restricted to ever smaller territories where American policies of social control were applied with increasing intensity. I definitely learned some thing from this book, but it was full of numbers, and kept jumping from tribe to tribe, so it was hard for me to stay focused on.

An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians by David J. Wishart. Indiana Magazine of History.

An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians, by David J. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. xv, 309 pp. Illustrations, maps, tables, notes, bibliography, index. Nineteenth-century American history is partially defined by the dis-possession of Native American peoples.

Historical geographer David J. Maps give the spatial context of dispossession, showing how Indian societies were restricted to ever smaller territories where American policies of social control were applied with increasing intensity

Historical geographer David J. Maps give the spatial context of dispossession, showing how Indian societies were restricted to ever smaller territories where American policies of social control were applied with increasing intensity

Bolt, C. (1997) An unspeakable sadness: The dispossession of the Nebraska Indians. Journal of American Studies, 31. pp. 450-451. Contact us about this Publication).

Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Library, 1936. Copy and paste a formatted citation or use one of the options to export in your chosen format.

An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians Jul 01, 1997. The Fur Trade of the American West: A Geographical Synthesis Oct 01, 1979. Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide. Box Office Mojo Find Movie Box Office Data. ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. CreateSpace Indie Print Publishing Made Easy.

Of all the interactions between American Indians and Euro-Americans, none was as fundamental as the acquisition of the indigenous peoples’ lands. To Euro-Americans this takeover of lands was seen as a natural right, an evolution to a higher use; to American Indians the loss of homelands was a tragedy involving also a loss of subsistence, a loss of history, and a loss of identity. Historical geographer David J. Wishart tells the story of the dispossession process as it affected the Nebraska Indians—Otoe-Missouria, Ponca, Omaha, and Pawnee—over the course of the nineteenth century. Working from primary documents, and including American Indian voices, Wishart analyzes the spatial and ecological repercussions of dispossession. Maps give the spatial context of dispossession, showing how Indian societies were restricted to ever smaller territories where American policies of social control were applied with increasing intensity. Graphs of population loss serve as reference lines for the narrative, charting the declining standards of living over the century of dispossession. Care is taken to support conclusions with empirical evidence, including, for example, specific details of how much the Indians were paid for their lands. The story is told in a language that is free from jargon and is accessible to a general audience.
Reviews: 7
luisRED
There are numerous histories covering the clash of civilizations since the English landed at Roanoke in 1585 and each is unique but surprisingly similar in how they unfold. However, the story of the cultures inhabiting what would become Nebraska in 1800 is not a well known part of this historiography. Wishart does a great job winding the history of the four tribes and their struggle to survive into a cohesive narrative.

While other tribes suffered from not only white encroachment and eastern native immigrants, this book left me wondering if any previous set had to also contend with such a strong and hostile tribe to their west as did the Ponca, Omaha, Otoe-Missouria and Pawnee did contending with their Ogalala and Brule enemies. Also, by the 1850's the pace of the change of Western society would render it impossible to adapt to the every changing environment and constant pressure.

This is an excellent source for Nebraska specifics, but it will also shed light on how previous tribes adapted and on what is in store for the Lakota.
SiIеnt
I went into this book with only an inkling of awareness of the horrible treatment inflicted on native tribes, not only in NE. There is much to ponder and try to grasp while reading of the detailed time span. Very interesting well documented maps and information.
Clandratha
I bought this thinking it was by the author of the Marcus Corvinus mysteries- although I did think it was a strange departure from ancient Rome... Anyway, I read it since I am also interested in American History. Very sad; I grieve for what we destroyed.
Nikobar
Detailed and well researched book that reads more like an informative novel. Photos, graphs, and maps to make connections with the past. Good read!
Iraraeal
It broke my heart to know that a people in this USA had been treated with such disrespect and complete abandonment as to their health and well being when in traveling - walking - to their new reservation and a total abandonment after being taken to this reservation. Sometimes history opens our eyes to the reality that certain people in government care nothing for the heart of the people to whom they are governing!
Haracetys
I thought this was a well-written and well-researched book. It tells a tragic story that sounds like fiction but sadly is fact. If you are interested in the Pawnee, Omaha, Ponca, or Otoe-Missouria tribes, the so-called indigenous tribes of Nebraska, this is an interesting book about their history. A quality book.
NiceOne
I use it as part of the reading assignments in the Anthropology class I teach. Very informative.
I read this book to research for my senior paper about Native American displacement and life on the reservation. It is the best one I've found so far. The author has presented an immense amount of detail about the natives in the Nebraska area, their history of forcible removal and life on the reservation. I will definitely be citing this book more than once for my assignment.