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ISBN:0820325635
Author: Edward Baptist,Stephanie Camp,Barbara Krauthamer,Christopher Brown,Dylan Penningroth,Herman L. Bennett,Jennifer L. Morgan,Phillip Troutman,Sharla M. Fett,Vincent Brown
ISBN13: 978-0820325637
Title: New Studies in the History of American Slavery
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ePUB size: 1210 kb
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Language: English
Category: Americas
Publisher: University of Georgia Press (February 6, 2006)
Pages: 310

New Studies in the History of American Slavery by Edward Baptist,Stephanie Camp,Barbara Krauthamer,Christopher Brown,Dylan Penningroth,Herman L. Bennett,Jennifer L. Morgan,Phillip Troutman,Sharla M. Fett,Vincent Brown



FREE shipping on qualifying offers. These essays, by some of the most prominent young historians writing about slavery, fill gaps in our understanding of such subjects as enslaved women. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Authors: Edward E Baptist Stephanie M H Camp Herman L Bennett Christopher Brown. more Vincent Brown Sharla M Fett Barbara Krauthamer Jennifer L Morgan Dylan C Penningroth Phillip Troutman. Inventive and stimulating, the essays model the blending of methods and styles that characterizes the new cultural history of slavery's social, political, and economic systems. Several common themes emerge from the volume, among them the correlation between race and identity; the meanings contained in family and community relationships, gender, and life's commonplaces; and the literary and legal representations that legitimated and codified enslavement and difference.

Baptist, Edward E. Personal Name: Camp, Stephanie M. H. Rubrics: Slavery United States History Historiography America. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006. This volume is primarily concerned with slavery in the South in the late antebellum period, the exceptions being Herman L. Bennett's piece on seventeenth-century Mexico, Christopher L. Brown's analysis of the politics of the "rise and fall of the British Atlantic planter class," Jennifer L. Morgan's well-illustrated survey of traveler descriptions of African women in. the eighteenth century, and Vincent Brown's analysis of the power of the spiritual and supernatural in Jamaica slave society. Barbara Krauthamer describes the incorporation into Creek society of runaway female African American slaves, some to be enslaved in Creek society and some to be considered free. In either case, she argues, the outcome was preferred to being enslaved by whites.

Morgan, Dylan Penningroth, and Stephanie Smallwood have taught me a great deal about slavery studies and also made conferences a lot more fun. After neglecting the dissertation (now a ‘‘book manuscript’’) for a year, I plunged back in ready to make some big changes. This was easier said than done, but detailed feedback about the project’s strengths and weaknesses made the process an adventure.

New Studies in the History of American Slavery (2006). Edward E. Baptist, Stephanie M. Camp. University of Georgia Press. Citation Information. com/dylan penningroth/7/.

Edward E. Baptist; Stephanie M. Camp, eds. (2006). My People, My People". New Studies in the History of American Slavery. ISBN 978-0-8203-2694-8. Meet the Fellows, Class of 2012 MacArthur Fellow, Dylan C. Penningroth. Dylan C. Penningroth". Department of History at University of California, Berkeley. URL retrieved 31 July 2018. This biography of an American historian is a stub.

The first full-length monograph chronicling chattel slavery in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, Krauthamer amply demonstrates how both before and after the era of Indian Removal in the mid-nineteenth century slavery also intersected with issues of race and gender in complicated ways

Barbara Krauthamer is associate professor of history at the University of t. For more information about Barbara Krauthamer, visit the Author Page. Upper-division undergraduates and above. An important overview of the lives of African and African American peoples who played relevant, active roles in United States affairs, adeptly navigated tribal and United States federal bureaucracy, and effectively articulated their views on race and identity. In this new book readers will find the most detailed picture yet of the lives of enslaved peoples living in the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations. Journal of American History. Follow the author on Twitter bk.

Stephanie M. Camp Lecture Fund for the History of Race & Gender: This fund will support the University of Washington Department of History to offer an annual lecture on the history of race and gender in honor of Stephanie’s innovative and important contributions to this field of scholarship. To contribute, please go to giving. Alternatively, you can make a check out to University of Washington (with Stephanie Camp in the for line) and mail it to the UW Department of History (attn: Lynn Thomas), Box 353560, Seattle, WA 98195-3560.

These essays, by some of the most prominent young historians writing about slavery, fill gaps in our understanding of such subjects as enslaved women, the Atlantic and internal slave trades, the relationships between Indians and enslaved people, and enslavement in Latin America. Inventive and stimulating, the essays model the blending of methods and styles that characterizes the new cultural history of slavery’s social, political, and economic systems.

Several common themes emerge from the volume, among them the correlation between race and identity; the meanings contained in family and community relationships, gender, and life’s commonplaces; and the literary and legal representations that legitimated and codified enslavement and difference. Such themes signal methodological and pedagogical shifts in the field away from master/slave or white/black race relations models toward perspectives that give us deeper access to the mental universe of slavery.

Topics of the essays range widely, including European ideas about the reproductive capacities of African women and the process of making race in the Atlantic world, the contradictions of the assimilation of enslaved African American runaways into Creek communities, the consequences and meanings of death to Jamaican slaves and slave owners, and the tensions between midwifery as a black cultural and spiritual institution and slave midwives as health workers in a plantation economy.

Opening our eyes to the personal, the contentious, and even the intimate, these essays call for a history in which both enslaved and enslavers acted in a vast human drama of bondage and freedom, salvation and damnation, wealth and exploitation.