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Download An Apple a Day: The Myths, Misconceptions and Truths About the Foods We Eat epub book
ISBN:1554683998
Author: Joe Schwarcz
ISBN13: 978-1554683994
Title: An Apple a Day: The Myths, Misconceptions and Truths About the Foods We Eat
Format: mobi lrf txt azw
ePUB size: 1703 kb
FB2 size: 1578 kb
DJVU size: 1503 kb
Language: English
Category: Diets and Weight Loss
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers; 1 edition (December 16, 2008)
Pages: 384

An Apple a Day: The Myths, Misconceptions and Truths About the Foods We Eat by Joe Schwarcz



Compendium of food additive specifications : Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives : 67th Meeting 2006. by Compendium of food additive specifications : Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives : 67th Meeting 2006. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book An apple a day : the myths, misconceptions, and truths about the foods we eat, Joe Schwarcz.

In An Apple a Day, he’s taken his thorough knowledge of food chemistry, applied it to today’s top food fears, trends, and questions, and leavened it with his trademark lighthearted approach. The result is both an entertaining revelation of the miracles of science happening in our bodies every time we bite into a morsel of food, and a telling exploration of the myths, claims, and misconceptions surrounding our obsession with diets, nutrition, and weight.

It's full of good omega-3 fats. First, he leads us through a tour of naturally occurring substances in our food supply, including flax, fiber, omega-3 fats, antioxidants, flavanols, vitamins, and minerals.

In An Apple a Day, hes taken his thorough knowledge of food chemistry, applied it to todays top food fears, trends, and questions, and leavened it with his trademark lighthearted approach.

Joe Schwarcz is director of McGill University's Office for Science and Society in Montreal. First, he leads us through a tour of naturally occurring substances in our food supply, including flax, fiber, omega-3 fats, antioxidants, flavanols, vitamins, and minerals

Drug truths drug truths dispelling the myths about pharma r&D john L. lamattina, p. Truths about the Trusts (1916) Misconceptions About Śaṅkara. The Truths about Dating and Mating. The Awful Truths: Famous Myths, Hilariously Debunked  . The Day We Met Cindy. Report "An apple a day: the myths, misconceptions, and truths about the foods we eat".

In An Apple a Day, Joe Schwarcz, who holds a PhD in chemistry and lectures on food science at McGill University, aims to guide consumers in their dietary decisions by casting the light of science on healthy ingredients, food-industry bugaboos, harmful contaminants, and bogus culinary trends. Dividing the book into four sections, Schwarcz offers 66 self-contained chapters that draw on a plethora of epidemiological studies. In the first and longest section, he provides highly valuable and fascinating information about the health benefits of dozens of naturally occurring substances in food, such.

Download An Apple A Day by Joe Schwarcz. In short chapters he aims his microscope at such highly touted foods as tomatoes, acai berries, curry and soy; additives like nitrites, artificial sweeteners, vitamins and fluoride; contaminants including pesticides, hormones, trans fats and dioxins; and what, for him, are suspect fads.

Eat salmon. It’ s full of good omega-3 fats. Don’ t eat salmon. It’ s full of PCBs and mercury. Eat more veggies. They’ re full of good antioxidants. Don’ t eat more veggies. The pesticides will give you cancer. Forget your dinner jacket and put on your lab coat: you have to be a nutritional scientist these days before you sit down to eat -- which is why we need Dr. Joe Schwarcz, the expert who’ s famous for connecting chemistry to everyday life. In An Apple a Day, he’ s taken his thorough knowledge of food chemistry, applied it to today’ s top food fears, trends and questions, and leavened it with his trademark lighthearted approach. The result is both an entertaining revelation of the miracles of science happening in our bodies every time we bite into a morsel of food, and a telling exploration of the myths, claims and misconceptions surrounding our obsession with diets, nutrition and weight. Looking first at h
Reviews: 3
Jay
I think he sums up the book quite nicely actually in the introduction. "A single meal can flood the body with thousands of compounds, many of which have never been isolated or identified."

This sentence alone points out the obvious misnomers associated with 'Nutrition-ism,' the flaws of Nutritional research and the importance of eating whole food. It is a strong indication, before he even discusses the various myths/facts of compounds we do know of, that it is impossible to assume that certain 'base chemicals' like Omega-3 fatty acids (to which there are actually 3 different types) are actually responsible for contributing to good health.

The truth is we really don't know if it is these Fatty Acids alone that contribute to good health, or if it's the interaction of those fatty-acids in conjunction with other compounds in fish oil for example that actually contribute to good health. How they interact with other aspects in our diet is also unknown. It could be their interaction with other compounds in our body or in other types of food that contribute to good health. Is the relationship between Omega-6 and Omega-3 consumption what is truly important?

The second most important aspect of the book, is that the 'poisons' we so aptly refer to when discussing things that are supposedly 'bad' for us (think lactose, gluten, fluoride, artificial sweeteners, etc...) are actually largely dependent on dosage to become toxic in the body and cause damage. Our bodies are in fact quite good at clearing up harmful chemicals that appear in even our most natural/organic of foods. Apple's for instance (and not many people would know this) contain formaldehyde, acetone (paint thinner) and cyanide (a known poison) in trace amounts, yet eating 2 or 3 apples a day will certainly not kill us. Toxicity is an important factor that many people miss in their assumption of the micro-nutrient content of food.

I think the introduction gives a good indication that this is what he believes as an eater: that whole foods are what is most important (not the molecular make-up) and that most of our food consumption is dependent on quantity or dosage, not what the specifics of the molecular make-up actually are.

As a food chemist, he also indicates that he is publishing a book based on the real science and not the interpretations of certain radical groups. He took a bunch of things that appear to be almost nutrition lore and looked at the actual data to support it. He never really appears to to offer strong support for one notion or the other, but rather attempts to let you come to your own conclusions.

The rest of the book, was a scientist's view on the chemistry of food. It also indicates that nutrition is highly individual and there are a lot of unknown's to this day. The question that he mostly poses is not whether any singular particular thing is good for you, but rather, will it actually harm you based on dosage?

Overall, I would say he wrote the book with a rather un-biased point of view. He points out some key flaws in certain types of rationality with regards to food from a purely scientific view point. The notion that artificial sweeteners turn to formaldehyde in the body, for example, is a ridiculous assumption, but he makes no such claims that consuming them is actually good for you, rather points out that they went through rigorous testing and the evidence was never conclusive that they cause any 'harm' at this point. That is not to say, that we won't in future, discover harm either.

I think you must read this book with an open mind. If you have already convinced yourself that lactose is bad, gluten is bad, trans-fat is bad, fluoride in water is bad, then you won't get anything from this book because you will not allow yourself to deviate from your previous beliefs about those minute details of the human diet.

When the truth is, as this book points out, that the consumption of certain types of foods is largely individual and 'it depends' on a variety of circumstances, many of which are unknown. If you have a gluten/lactose intolerance, then gluten/lactose is bad, but if you don't, then milk and grain products can contribute to overall health and well-being. If you are predisposed to tooth decay than brushing your teeth with a flouride based tooth-paste is probably a good idea. There is some research now finding naturally occurring trans-fat that might actually be good for you health believe it or not, though that is too recent to have been published in this book (maybe in a future edition you will see it).

We as a society like the good vs evil approach. Each of us have our beliefs about the good foods and the obvious counter-balancing evil foods. We can't have good without evil, right? It appears though that these beliefs are constantly changing as new research is done (in limited context and applicability I might add), which leads to more and more confusing data on a wide variety of foods and food compounds.

There are, however, two-sides to every story and I think as a general whole, Dr. Swartz does a fairly good job of citing both sides of these stories in a concise fashion.
Swift Summer
Everyone that tries to live a healthier and better life should read this book. This book is very informative and help you make your own opinion of diet fads. I enjoyed this book very much. It was entertaining. The fact that Dr. Schwarz uses data from studies conducted outside the US should not affect your interest in the book. This is how science and politics work; sometimes money in the US is not donated to fund research that could influence lets say the whole food industry. The book doesn't focus on just one diet trend. You can read all about antioxidants found in acai berries, blueberries... What has been proven to help you live longer and healthier and what hasn't. I'm pretty sure that if you like one of the subject in particular you can contact the author for some references or use PUBMED.
Jusari
Several things were not detailed enough--for instance; talking about high fructose corn syrup.. there are Lots of studies that indicate how bad this is.. he barely talked about any of that. He mentioned a study about soft drinks in Norway, or somewhere.. THEY don't use this stuff; so it was not relevant. WE, Us American's are the only people that use this in like, 80 or 90 percent of our canned/processed food.

AND he believed that fluoride was okay for water consumption. There were several other 'issues'...... he acted like man made sweeteners were okay, overall..
made fun of stevia.. I couldn't even read the whole book.