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ISBN:0262021994
Author: David B Brownlee,Victoria Newhouse
ISBN13: 978-0262021999
Title: The Law Courts: The Architecture of George Edmund Street (Architectural History Foundation Book) (Architectural History Foundation Books)
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ePUB size: 1548 kb
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Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: The MIT Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (November 7, 1984)
Pages: 430

The Law Courts: The Architecture of George Edmund Street (Architectural History Foundation Book) (Architectural History Foundation Books) by David B Brownlee,Victoria Newhouse



This is the first book devoted exclusively to Street and his greatest work, the Royal Law Courts in the Strand. George Edmund Street (1824-1881) was a leader of the High Victorian generation of British architects. A prolific and innovative artist.

George Edmund Street (1824-1881) was a leader of the High Victorian generation of British architects. This is the first book devoted exclusively to Street and his greatest work, the Royal Law Courts in the Strand.

This book is volume 8 in the Architectural History Foundation Series. In The Law Courts, David Brownlee makes extensive use of the vast archives of the Public Record Office to document a monument that embodies both the professional controversies surrounding architectural theory and the personal conflicts of an architect caught between two generations of style.

This series featuring distinguished works of architectural history by emerging and established scholars was distributed by the MIT Press for the Architectural History Foundation, a nonprofit publisher of scholarly books in this field, which operated from 1978 until 1994. This series is no longer active. The Architecture of George Edmund Street. David B Brownlee 1984.

British Architecture at Home and Abroad. Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 46 No. 1, Ma. 1987 (pp. 82-83) DOI: 1. 307/990149.

Alexandrina Buchanan is both an architectural historian and an archivist; her introduction to archives came through cataloguing the papers of Robert Willis at the Cambridge University Library. She is now Lecturer in Archive Studies at the University of Liverpool.

Architectural Books, and Professional and Trade Journals (a general discussion). A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method for the Student, Craftsman, and Amateur. By Banister Fletcher and Banister F. Fletcher 5th e. revised and enlarged. London: Batsford, 1905. The Rise of Architectural History. London: Architectural Press, 1990.

It distills the data provided in standard architectural volumes and is an easy-to-use reference for the most indispensable-and most requested-types of architectural information.

This book is structured around the career of a remarkable individual; remarkable in the sense that his contemporaries found him – and his activities – worthy of note and, by and large, posterity has concurred. CHAPTER 3 Remarks on the Architecture of the Middle Ages and the Membrological Approach. CHAPTER 8 ‘Architectural and Social History’: Canterbury and Cambridge.

Architectural History Foundation Publisher - 33 works, 2 ebooks. Publishing History This is a chart to show the when this publisher published books.

This is the first book devoted exclusively to Street and his greatest work, the Royal Law Courts in the Strand.

George Edmund Street (1824-1881) was a leader of the High Victorian generation of British architects. A prolific and innovative artist, he also played an important role in the reshaping of architectural taste that occurred in England at mid century. This is the first book devoted exclusively to Street and his greatest work, the Royal Law Courts in the Strand. In The Law Courts, David Brownlee makes extensive use of the vast archives of the Public Record Office to document a monument that embodies both the professional controversies surrounding architectural theory and the personal conflicts of an architect caught between two generations of style. More than an examination of a single building, the book is also a history of political and legal reform in the middle of Queen Victoria's reign. In the course of describing the Law Courts in their urban and architectural context, Brownlee also discusses the nature of the bureaucracy that oversaw official patronage of the arts and the demands of clients whose interests often conflicted. He describes the competition in which Street attempted to unite the irregular vigor of Gothic with the quasi-classical symmetry and monumentality appropriate for a public building, the long series of revised designs which increasingly displayed the picturesque qualities of the new Queen Anne taste, and the actual construction of the Courts.

This book is volume 8 in the Architectural History Foundation Series.