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ISBN:026204062X
Author: James A. Dunn
ISBN13: 978-0262040624
Title: Miles to Go: European and American Transporation Policies (Transportation Studies)
Format: txt mbr lit doc
ePUB size: 1853 kb
FB2 size: 1201 kb
DJVU size: 1923 kb
Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: The MIT Press (February 26, 1981)
Pages: 214

Miles to Go: European and American Transporation Policies (Transportation Studies) by James A. Dunn



This incisive and highly readable book offers a broad range of perspectives, directions, and policy options for transportation planners and political practitioners.

Dunn compares various modes of American transportation with those of three western European countries that have historically been faced with greater resource constraints in terms of energy use, environmental and land-use controls, and financial commitments

From Transportation Studies. Miles to Go. European and American Transporation Policies. By James A. Dunn and Ctr For Transportation. Ctr For Transportation. Qualitative Choice Analysis.

Transportation Studies. The series presents works across the broad spectrum of transportation concerns. Each individual work is intended to be in in-depth treatment from a particular viewpoint. Together the works in the series present a broad perspective on the field of transportation as a whole. Books in this Series. James A. Dunn and Ctr For Transportation 1981. Fundamentals of Transportation Systems Analysis, Volume 1.

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Dunn J (1981)Miles to Go: European and American Transportation Policies. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Elliot W (1986) Fumbling toward the edge of history: California's quest for a road pricing experiment. Giuliano G (1992) Transportation demand management and urban traffic congestion: Promise or panacea?Journal of the American Planning Association 58(3): 327–335. Giuliano G, Levine D & Teal R (1990) Impact of high occupancy vehicle lanes on carpooling behavior. Transportation 17: 159–177.

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Miles to Go: European and American Transportation Policies. Andrew T. Cowart (a1). State University of New York, Stony Brook.

James A. Dunn Jr. is professor of political science and public administration at Rutgers University-Camden. He was a member of the . He is the author of Miles To Go: European and American Transportation Policies (MIT, 1981). All. T. The Politics of Automobility: Fewer Trips or Better Cars? James A. Dunn, Jr. Wednesday, December 1, 1999.

This incisive and highly readable book offers a broad range of perspectives, directions, and policy options for transportation planners and political practitioners. Dunn compares various modes of American transportation with those of three western European countries that have historically been faced with greater resource constraints in terms of energy use, environmental and land-use controls, and financial commitments. Specifically, the piecemeal fashion in which the railroads of France were brought under public ownership is compared with the similar—but lagging—trend in the United States from private ownership to federal control; the relative success of mass transit in West Germany is contrasted with the dismal decline of mass transit in American urban conglomerates; and "the rise and fall of the road fund" in Britain is examined both on its own terms and in terms of the perspective it accords in recounting the American experience in highway building. In addition, a chapter on the automobile probes the mechanisms that Europeans have applied to bring the runaway automotive culture under a reasonable degree of control, mechanisms that are in a sense being tested for Americans against that time when they fully face up to the necessity of putting the car in its proper place in the national lifestyle. A final chapter summarizes the author's transatlantic contrasts and completes his demonstration of the importance of cultural and institutional factors in shaping the "paradigms of public choice." He concludes that resource constraints are moving America toward a more European-like need for social efficiency in transportation, and offers some fundamental policy principles based on the European experience to guide the transition.