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Download Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio epub book
ISBN:087259579X
Author: ARRL Inc.,Edith Lennon
ISBN13: 978-0872595798
Title: Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio
Format: rtf mbr docx doc
ePUB size: 1538 kb
FB2 size: 1772 kb
DJVU size: 1744 kb
Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: Amer Radio Relay League (March 30, 2012)

Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio by ARRL Inc.,Edith Lennon



Compact Antennas Are Possible on Top Band! 160 meters is known to radio amateurs as top band. This is not a finished book - it is a prototype collection of articles that gives patchy coverage of modeled results for transmit antennas at . MHz (160 meter wavelength) - the extension of the amateur radio "short wave" band into the top of the AM broadcast band.

160 meters is known to radio amateurs as �top band. Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio dares to discuss the possibility of smaller antennas for this intriguing band. Intended for amateurs with advanced skills in antenna modeling, Grant Bingeman, KM5KG, walks you through the theory behind innovative designs for relatively compact antennas. You�ll learn how to enhance bandwidth, minimize loss, and employ other techniques to enjoy 160 meters with limited real estate.

The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the national association for amateur radio, connecting hams around the . with news, information and resources. You've reached the page for Short Antennas for 160 Meters by Grant Bingeman, KM5KG. Download the Method of Moment files used in Short Antennas for 160 Meters. Download the color illustrations used in Short Antennas for 160 Meters. Back to Top. Having Trouble? Publications & Online Store Product Notes 160 Meter Antennas. Antenna Modeling for Beginners. Get on the Air with HF Digital. Ham Radio for Arduino and PICAXE. ARRL's Low Power Communication. ARRL's Small Antennas for Small Spaces. Radio Amateur's Workshop.

Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio dares to discuss the possibility of smaller antennas for this intriguing band. Intended for amateurs with advanced Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio. Compact Antennas Are Possible on Top Band! 160 meters is known to radio amateurs as top band. Paperback, First, 64 pages.

Book is sold! ARRL - Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio Employ techniques to enjoy 160 meters with limited real-estate. For amateurs with advanced skills in antenna modeling. 45 including Postage to US. Bill W2CQ bmarx @ bellsouth. This book might be a useful collection of models, all evaluated for . MHz, always. assuming an added loading-coil to make the short antenna resonant, that give almost-adequate coverage of vertical, straight-wire antennas with optional.

See "Aiming for a Clean Sweep is Big Part of ARRL November Sweepstakes" for more details and information. SS phone logs are due by November 25. - eHam. net is a Web site dedicated to ham radio (amateur radio). Even one elevated quarter-wave radial will make a big difference, if you have room. dio by Grant Bingeman, KM5KG, might provide some ideas. You may even be able to put out enough signal to make a few contacts simply by loading up your existing 40- or 80-meter dipole.

ARRL Antenna Compendiums. ARRL Antenna Designer's Notebook. ARRL Antenna Physics: An Introduction. ARRL Guide to Antenna Tuners. ARRL HF Dipole Antennas for Amateur Radio. ARRL Magic Band Antennas. ARRL Portable Antenna Classics. ARRL Receiving Antennas for the Radio Amateur ARRL Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio. ARRL Small Antennas for Small Spaces. ARRL Small Antennas for Small Spaces - Second E. .ARRL Yagi Antenna Classics. RSGB An Introduction to Antenna Modeling. RSGB Antennas for VHF & Above. RSGB Backyard Antennas.

Compact Antennas Are Possible on Top Band!160 meters is known to radio amateurs as top band. However, 160-meter antennas can be large and difficult to install due to lack of available space.Short Antennas for 160 Meter Radio dares to discuss the possibility of smaller antennas for this intriguing band. Intended for amateurs with advanced skills in antenna modeling, Grant Bingeman, KM5KG, walks you through the theory behind innovative designs for relatively compact antennas. You ll learn how to enhance bandwidth, minimize loss, and employ other techniques to enjoy 160 meters with limited real estate. Contents: Short Antenna Behavior, A Better Way to Define Antenna Bandwidth, Why Top-loading Can Improve Short Antenna Performance, Top Hat Arrangements, Inverted Cone Antennas, Closed Antennas, Antennas with Two Driven Elements, T-shaped Antennas, Inverted L-shaped Antennas, Antennas with Four Driven Elements, Spiral Antennas, Small Horizontal Antennas and Quadrature Feed Arrangements
Reviews: 6
Urreur
This is not a finished book -- it is a prototype collection of articles that gives patchy coverage of modeled results for transmit antennas at 1.8 MHz (160 meter wavelength) -- the extension of the amateur radio "short wave" band into the top of the AM broadcast band.

This book might be a useful collection of models, all evaluated for 1.8 MHz, always assuming an added loading-coil to make the short antenna resonant, that give almost-adequate coverage of vertical, straight-wire antennas with optional flat-top loading, cage-frame vertical wires, conical-shaped top-loading, and inverted-cone verticals. The book has good, sensible consideration of the effects of real earth and wire-frame ground-planes in real earth for many of its 25 models. Unfortunately, all of the models are either not optimized at all, or only optimized for one parameter in the design.

The chapter titles are:
1. Short antenna behavior.
2. A better way to define antenna bandwidth.
3. Why top-loading can improve short antenna performance.
4. Top-hat arrangements.
5. Inverted cone antennas.
6. Closed antennas.
7. Antennas with two driven elements.
8. T-shaped antennas.
9. Inverted L-antennas.
10. Antennas with four driven elements.
11. Spiral antennas.
12. Small horizontal antennas.
13. Quadrature feed antennas.

Chapters 1-3 are background. Chapter 2 has some math related to the author's new notion of how to distill antenna performance into one number.

Chapter 3 is perhaps the most important and best-supported of the whole book: The bottom 2/3 or 1/2 of a quarter-wave (monopole) does almost all of the work producing the radiated signal. The top part just serves as a large capacitor against the ground, so that current can move in the rest of the antenna. So a "top hat" or top-loading similar to the wire ground-plane can serve the same function and reduce the height of the antenna. However, this is well explained in many other antenna books that give a bit of theory. Anyone who does not understand top-loading or "capacitance hats" (and for that matter, "bottom loading" via ground-planes) will benefit some from this book.

Bingeman definitely over-generalizes his modeling results; it isn't that all his results are incorrect (some perhaps), it's that he interprets his results beyond the limitations his models impose on the designs discussed in the book. Even worse, I find the lack of comparison to real-world antennas of the modeled design is an overwhelming weakness in the book.

Chapters 4--13 are antenna-model reports. Something like half of those chapters only report a single model of the general-type described. The author expresses very definite opinions, but they all appear to be based on the limited models he used apparently with no attempt to optimize the model lay-out, or only optimize it for a single proportion, nor any comparison of his modeling against real-world antenna designs.

As is very common for amateur radio antenna books, this one only considers transmit designs, and does not model the different merits of designs for transmission and reception. This is particularly unfortunate for this book, since only about two or three designs are directional. Signals arrive at a station as plane waves -- like waves crashing on a beach. Transmissions depart non-directional antennas as expanding rings -- like ripples expanding out from a stone tossed in a pond. For most of the designs in this book the antenna's merits for reception and transmission will be different.

I bought this book because it has a section on spiral antennas, but it is a big disappointment. I am fairly sure that Bingeman's emphatic and perfunctory dismissal of the helical antenna is a bad call. He bases it on a single, coarse, model that was only optimized in one measure. His model only uses four straight segments (a broken square) to model each single loop in the helix. A square is not a good approximation of a circle. Also bad is that all of the model's square "loops" are aligned. Numerically, lining up the elbows of the straight-line sections should make the already-crude model worse, over-emphasizing interaction between the line segments rather than the (hoped for) interactions between the loops. (A helical antenna should act, at least in part, as its own loading coil.) This is another case where a check against real antennas is very much necessary (say, a resonated "broomstick" or double-broomstick with end-loading, wrapped on 10-inch PVC sewer-pipe?).

As noted by another reviewer, the black-and-white illustrations are inadequate. Many of the antennas shown have complicated overlapping lines from any point of view (for example, an inverted, simulated-conical) and are also over-loaded with diagramming symbols. The black-and-white computer-output sketches just don't work -- perversely, a few, crude, hand-drawn sketches would have been better. The color versions of the diagrams provided online by the publisher at ARRL.org/160-meter-antennas do not solve the problem. Try looking at them before you buy the book. You have to know what the author is trying to depict before you can make sense of the diagrams; the diagrams are not good enough to help you understand the text.
Beahelm
Decent book for 160 antennas but for the most part its just reprinted material that can be found online.
Amerikan_Volga
I didn't find this book to be of much use. The drawings are small and confusing. $23 for a book that's only one eighth of an inch thick?

Despite the fact that probably the commonest 160 meter antenna is variations of the Inverted L, the authors only devote slightly more than one page to it. IMHO, they spend too much space on antennas that very few hams will ever have the time, money and real estate to build.

Generally, I keep all antenna books that I buy since even the mediocre ones have at least some information or designs of value. This one, OTOH, will be dumped at the next flea market or hamfest.
Kelerana
Just a lot of theory and formula . . .
Shaktit
This book covers several different styles of 160 meter antenna design. It is not one which offers specific plans for the hobbyist but is deep in theory. This information could be valuable if your considering a design of your own. The author is actually Grant Bingeman KM5KG. Edith Lennon N2ZRW is the editor.
Gold as Heart
Lots of great ideas.