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Download The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Freshwater in the Twenty-First Century epub book
ISBN:1416535462
Author: Alex Prud'homme
ISBN13: 978-1416535461
Title: The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Freshwater in the Twenty-First Century
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ePUB size: 1649 kb
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Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (April 10, 2012)
Pages: 448

The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Freshwater in the Twenty-First Century by Alex Prud'homme



Personal Name: Prud'homme, Alex. Varying Form of Title: Ripple effect : the fate of freshwater in the 21st century.

AS ALEX PRUD’HOMME and his great-aunt Julia Child were completing their collaboration on her memoir, My Life in France, they began to talk about the French obsession with bottled water, which had finally spread to America. From this spark of interest, Prud’homme began what would become an ambitious quest to understand the evolving story of freshwater.

Will the wars of the twenty-first century be fought over water? As the climate warms and world population grows. The Ripple Effect is true to its title, following the myriad reverberations from our use and abuse of this most abundant, ubiquitous resource. The book plunges in and rarely comes up for air. -Washington Post. Alex Prud’homme was born in New York City. As a global water expert I was impressed with the first third of this book, but then I got tired of reading old stories. The type and amount of drinking water contamination is a HUGE international problem, and he should have focused on that, not just the Chesapeake. Yes it is a good story, but the complexities of life long ingestion of desalted water, recycled water, or what we can 'produced water' is what needs to be discussed.

The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Fresh Water in the Twenty-First Century. AS ALEX PRUD’HOMME and his great-aunt Julia Child were completing their collaboration on her memoir, My Life in France, they began to talk about the French obsession with bottled water, which had finally spread to America. From this spark of interest, Prud’homme began what would become an ambitious quest to understand the evolving story of freshwater

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Alex Prud’homme’s book The Ripple Effect starts with a homicide. This is entirely appropriate for a book about the fate of freshwater in the twenty-first century (the author’s subtitle). Geetha Angara, a 43-year old hydrochemist, wife and mother of three, and the person responsible for assuring EPA water quality standards at a New Jersey water purification plant, was found dead at her work.

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After all, we can live without oil, but not without water. I think of this book as an intellectual adventure story. Alex Prud’homme makes a vast and desperately serious topic flow beautifully through the rocks and hard places that our planet is caught between – John Seabrook, staff writer at the New Yorker. The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Freshwater in the 21st Century Lauren Lavelle Senior Publicist, Scribner.

From the bestselling coauthor with Julia Child of My Life in France “a balanced and insightful assessment of what could emerge as the dominant issue in decades ahead” (Associated Press)—the fate of fresh water in the twenty-first century.Will there be enough drinkable water to satisfy future demand? What is the state of our water infrastructure—both the pipes that bring us freshwater and the levees that keep it out? How secure is our water supply from natural disasters and terrorist attacks? Can we create new sources for our water supply through scientific innovation? Is water a right like air or a commodity like oil? Will the wars of the twenty-first century be fought over water? As the climate warms and world population grows, demand for water has surged, but supplies of freshwater are static or dropping, and new threats to water quality appear every day. The Ripple Effect is Alex Prud’homme’s vividly written and engaging inquiry into the fate of freshwater in the twenty-first century. Like Daniel Yergin’s classic The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power, Prud’homme’s The Ripple Effect is a masterwork of investigation and dramatic narrative. Prud’homme introduces readers to an array of colorful, obsessive, brilliant—and sometimes shadowy— characters through whom these issues come alive. The Ripple Effect will change the way we think about the water we drink.
Reviews: 7
Villo
I enjoyed this book. It is really long, though. It is a pretty comprehensive look at all aspects of water management, and I learned a lot (I have an easy job this summer and was able to read it all at work). Some of it is redundant, and maybe it has been corrected, but in my Kindle version almost every word that ended in "ft" like soft or lift had the f missing. It took me forever to get around to reading it, so some of the information is a bit outdated, but the underlying message of taking much better care of our water cannot be overemphasized. It makes perfect sense to provide a subsistence level of water to everyone and then to progressively increase rates for overuse, as this book says multiple times. I am not sure why it isn't done. I was playing golf in Ireland last year and our caddie was arguing with us about Ireland's plan to charge for water use. It rains a lot there, but a lot also goes into producing clean water (he also argued with me, a doctor, and my friend, a dentist, about their plan to put fluoride in the water). We really need to mandate rainwater collection in houses (similar to Bermuda) with storage there for land use, etc. and stop using treated water for washing cars, watering lawns, and one of my pet peeves, hosing down sidewalks to clean them. So much can be done, but we have to change the mindset of consumers big and small.
Thomand
As a global water expert I was impressed with the first third of this book, but then I got tired of reading old stories. The type and amount of drinking water contamination is a HUGE international problem, and he should have focused on that, not just the Chesapeake. Yes it is a good story, but the complexities of life long ingestion of desalted water, recycled water, or what we can 'produced water' is what needs to be discussed. Most human beings have no idea what they are now drinking - yes, even in the most regulated market in the world - USA.
Eseve
This is a wake up call of the first dimension about the critical importance of and the widespread scarcity of water, of which most people are unaware and ill prepared for the changes in attitude and practices that a new relation with water that will be required of them and of their governments-hopefully..
Kerahuginn
An indispensable read for anyone concerned about freshwater availability, management, and sustainability. A prediction that this will be the Water Century.
Bludworm
Fascinating read with basic concepts to understand critical issues facing the world,s future water challenges . Politics, conflicts of interest, greed, waste, infrastructure breakdown, poor management, conservation, and much more are issues discussed in a very readable way. I found this a very worthwhile book and very well referenced. I learned a great deal. Every one should be informed about the critical problems we face with life resource! This was a good read.
Nalmezar
I'm not done reading this book. Some books you just can't gallop through, they must be digested incrementally, and this is one of them. I have felt for some time that water, being indispensable to all life, will inevitably and finally be the one thing that either pits humans against each other or ultimately forces us to cooperate. Let's hope it is the latter.
We have done such a whole lot of damage to this planet that I hold slight hope of it (and us) holding on a whole lot longer. Yes, I sound like a nut, but how long could you hold out without water? -- Maybe 3 days. So many people walk many miles each day to obtain water -- and really cruddy water at that. We're still lucky in the US to have fresh water -- just turn on the tap, there it is -- but we're using it up faster than we should. Agriculture and fracking and industry etc etc use billions of gallons per day. I sure don't know what the answer is, and I'm betting that by the end of the book the answer will still not be clear.
This is an important issue that should have TRUE cooperation nationally and internationally, it's above politics. It's about the survival of life on planet earth. And we can't survive without water.
Nidor
Water is scarce and the human population exploding the need for natural resources is important... excellent book. We all need to wake up and conserve. This is serious. Our life depends on it.
This is a book that everyone who cares about the future of our county should read.