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ISBN:917871060X
Author: Jan-Olof Drangert
ISBN13: 978-9178710607
Title: Who Cares About Water?: A Study of Household Water Development in Sukumaland, Tanzania (Linkoping Studies in Arts and Science)
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ePUB size: 1472 kb
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Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: Coronet Books Inc (October 1, 1993)
Pages: 300

Who Cares About Water?: A Study of Household Water Development in Sukumaland, Tanzania (Linkoping Studies in Arts and Science) by Jan-Olof Drangert



The Saab-Scania story.

Dissertation: Who cares about water? : A study of household water development in Sukumaland, Tanzania. The focus is on activities that are managed and controlled in the community and involve human and physical resources. Equal emphasis is given to understanding continuity aspects (doing more of the same) and change (doing new things). Thirty knowledgeable informants from six rural villages in Sukumaland provided the bulk of the information.

Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

9. Judith Leavitt, Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996). 10. Daniel Roche, Le Temps de L’Eau Rare: Du Moyen Age à l’Epoque Moderne, Annales: Economies, Sociétés, Civilisations (39) (1984), pp. 383-99. 11. B. Latour, Aramis, or the Love of Technology, trans. Catherine Porter (Cam-bridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996).

In Ikoma,Musoma region a borehole was sunk on a hill from which witches had in the past been thrown to their deaths, an unpopular and bare place were no one lived. Who Cares About Water? Household Water Development in Sukumaland. The Sonjo of Tanganyika. An Anthro-pological Study of an Irrigation Based Society. London: Oxford University Press.

ller, The manure book, or principles for the handling of plant nutrients in the cities and the Countryside, Stockholm, Sweden. In: E. Mrald, Cycles of Earth, PhD thesis, Department of Historical Studies, Ume University, Ume. (In Swedish, English summary). E.

by Jan-Olof Drangert · data of the paperback book Who Cares About Water?: A Study. by Jan-Olof Drangert. ISBN: 978-91-7871-060-7. ISBN-10: 91-7871-060-X. Coronet Books Inc · 1993.

The water cost was considered high especially for the poor who could not afford the cost and therefore used alternative unprotected services. In response, the municipality recently lowered the cost. In other cases, because most of the systems were only a few years old, some people were not adjusted to taste and went back to the original, lower quality water sources. On some days, waiting times were too long, forcing some people to use a more distant, unimproved source. Water-borne diseases: caused by water that has been contaminated by human, animal or chemical wastes. Examples include cholera, typhoid, meningitis, dysentery, hepatitis and diarrhoea. Diarrhoea is caused by a host of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms most of which can be spread by contaminated water (WHO, 2006).

As a result, Tanzania's ground water is the major source of water for the nation's people; however it's not always clean. TGNP, Tanzanian Gender Networking Program, found in a study of poor households "that the lack of safe, sufficient, and affordable water in Tanzania had increased rates of gender-based violence and the number of girls dropping out of school. Families who don't have money for water, let alone school, have no choice but to send their daughters out to collect water, possibly resulting in these episodes of violence. Unfortunately, the choices of these families are limited, they need water to survive

This is a study of the incentives and constraints which bear upon people's ability to improve access to and quality of household water through their own cooperative and household efforts. The focus is on community-based management and control of human and physical resources. Equal emphasis is given to understanding continuity aspects (doing more of the same) and change (doing new things).Thirty knowledgeable informants from six rural villages in Sukumaland provided the bulk of the information. They live in an area with a semi-arid to sub-humid climate situated south-east of Lake Victoria in Tanzania.Human and physical factors influence what takes place on the local scene and a model is developed to analyse water-related activities. In-depth interviews and observation provide the basis for an exploration of ways in which individuals and neighbourhoods reason and act to obtain household water of acceptable quality at a reasonable distance. The interviews were aimed at elucidating the actual levels of knowledge and technical skills employed in effecting specific improvements. The informants' knowledge of hydrogeological conditions and of the hygienic aspects of water use are appraised and compared with full professional standards of knowledge.Sukuma norms about water-related issues have been explored: water rights and control over water sources, and household and cooperative efforts. Informants' individual values on these matters are compared with the norms. The aim is to learn the ways in which both norms and individual values affect negotiations about proper measures in the community and within the household.Four major findings come out of the analysis. The first is that villagers in general believe that there are affordable and manageable solutions to their own household water problems. Secondly, government and donor involvement in the household water sector tends to inhibit more advanced local initiatives and activities. Thirdly, the present gender-based division of household tasks interferes negatively with improvements. Finally, there are considerable differences in the value placed upon different kinds of accessible water sources by outside observers and the villagers themselves.The prospects for future improvement in household water conditions are heavily influenced by the rapid population increase. The capacity for government interventions is limited, and in future most efforts to develop water supplies are expected to be made by individuals and neighbourhoods. The hydrological conditions allow for the provision of enough household water well into the next century, although the population growth will eventually cause water scarcity and hit food production.