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ISBN:1426201192
Author: Gene Eisman,Sergei Khrushchev,Von Hardesty
ISBN13: 978-1426201196
Title: Epic Rivalry: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race
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Language: English
Category: Engineering
Publisher: National Geographic (September 18, 2007)
Pages: 304

Epic Rivalry: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race by Gene Eisman,Sergei Khrushchev,Von Hardesty



Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman take you back to the origins, before Sputnik, through its launch in October of 1957 and into the arms of current space. With eloquence and discernment they bring to life the voices of the electrifying story from both sides of the Iron Curtain. There is magic in these pages because what you are hearing isn't competing specifications but rather the rise and fall of mutual dreams. Epic Rivalry is the place to dip your oar. It's the core of the whole story.

Personal Name: Hardesty, Von, 1939-. Publication, Distribution, et. Washington, . National Geographic, (c)2007. by Increasing state flexibility in use of federal child protection funds : hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, second session, July 20, 2000. ISBN: 0160655498 Publication & Distribution: Washington. Congressional Sales Office, (c)2001. The philosophy of the middle way : Nagarjuna ; introduction, Sanskrit text, English translation, and annotation, David J. Kalupahana. by Na?ga?rjuna ; introduction, Sanskrit.

EPIC RIVALRY: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. From the Soviet Union's Sputnik to the United States' Apollo 11, the exciting competition between Cold War superpowers to dominate space. In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the United States. Пользовательский отзыв - ABVR - LibraryThing. Conceptually, this book goes where dozens of earlier books have gone before; Over the familiar ground from the German V-2 program of WWII to the triumphant landing of Apollo 11 on the moon in 1969

The book includes a foreword by Sergei Khrushchev, an engineer and one-time participant in the Soviet space program and son of Nikita Khrushchev, Soviet leader during seven of the space race years. It also contains 64 pages of rare, historic images, many never before published. The book shows how each side played a vital role in stimulating the work of the other

Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman take you back to the origins, before Sputnik, through its launch in October of 1957 and into the arms of current space.

The foreword, written by Sergei Khrushchev, was eventually the son of Soviet Union premier Nikita Khrushchev The title of the book was also significant: the main title, Epic Rivalry, focused on the premature heated antagonism between the United States and the Soviet Union. The duration of the conflict started in 1957 when Sputnik went to outer space up to the Apollo landing on the moon in 1969. The central characters of the book were Wernher von Braun and Sergei Korolev, and supported by other astronauts, cosmonauts, engineers, and even politician of that time. The chapters were separated by two and four paged sidebars on topics that were technical such as atomic propulsion, and orbital mechanics. Sorry, but copying text is not allowed on this site. Topic: Epic Rivalry: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race. How About You Write Your Own?

Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman, Epic Rivalry: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2007. Five decades after Sputnik I gave birth to the Space Age and the . Soviet space race, the story of that era has been told and retold countless times. In Epic Rivalry: The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race, Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman tell it once more. Although the book does not break new ground, the authors weave an entertaining tale with the right blend of personalities, politics, and technospeak. The foreword by Sergei Khrushchev, the son of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and himself an engineer who worked in the Soviet space program, is of particular note with its first-hand stories of Soviet politics and the personal rivalries among the leaders of the key space design bureaus.

by Von Hardesty Book Views: 12. Author. The extraordinary saga that gripped the United States and Soviet Union during the Cold War-galvanized by the Sputnik launch in 1957, and culminated by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walking on the moon in 1969-is chronicled in this uniquely balanced history.

The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race. The Inside Story of the Soviet and American Space Race. Inside the Soviet and American Space Race. By Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman Foreword by Sergei Khrushchev. By Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman.

Scores of rare, unpublished, and powerful photographs recall the urgency and technical creativity of both nations' efforts.

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon in 1969, they personified an almost unimaginable feat—the incredibly complex task of sending humans safely to another celestial body. This extraordinary odyssey, which grew from the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War, was galvanized by the Sputnik launch in 1957. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Sputnik, National Geographic recaptures this gripping moment in the human experience with a lively and compelling new account. Written by Smithsonian curator Von Hardesty and researcher Gene Eisman, Epic Rivalry tells the story from both the American and the Russian points of view, and shows how each space-faring nation played a vital role in stimulating the work of the other. Scores of rare, unpublished, and powerful photographs recall the urgency and technical creativity of both nations' efforts. The authors recreate in vivid detail the "parallel universes" of the two space exploration programs, with visionaries Wernher von Braun and Sergei Korolev and political leaders John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev at the epicenters. The conflict between countries, and the tense drama of their independent progress, unfolds in vivid prose. Approaching its subject from a uniquely balanced perspective, this important new narrative chronicles the epic race to the moon and back as it has never been told before—and captures the interest of casual browsers and science, space, and history enthusiasts alike.
Reviews: 7
Unnis
If you are interested in the race to the Moon, this is by far one of the very best books. The information about the Soviet space program was (for me) the most interesting and useful for one of my current writing projects. An excellent read!
Tehn
Good behind the scene history of the early space race especially the Russian side and info from Khrushchev's son who was an rocket engineer.
kolos
1957. The USSR places a object in orbit around the Earth. And the Space Race was started. Fueled by the politics of the Cold War and the pressures of the military seeing space as the "High Ground" it soon drove both the USSR and the USA towards the greatest High Ground there was - the Moon. the book is a very detailed history of the Space Race between the two nations. The book shows both sides of this great rivalry as the two sides raced against each other, showing their victories and defeats, their merits and flaws. There we have two different nations run by two different systems trying for the same goals.
It is a great book for any person interested in space, history, and the Cold War. The amazing forward by Sergei Khurshchev really makes it worth having. Both authors have a huge amount of knowledge about space and together make a wonderful book. Can't really say enough about this book.
Cesar
In a snapshot world with nano attention spans, Epic Rivalry manages to grab and hold on. The world in 1957 was on the seam between vacuum tube and microchip, between perceived American complacency and Russian Atomic tests that dropped Strontium 90 in milk bottles across the United States. Amid the tension and fear, two clumsy stumbling giants began the race that framed the future and shapes the world view of space to this day.

Von Hardesty and Gene Eisman take you back to the origins, before Sputnik, through its launch in October of 1957 and into the arms of current space. With eloquence and discernment they bring to life the voices of the electrifying story from both sides of the Iron Curtain. There is magic in these pages because what you are hearing isn't competing specifications but rather the rise and fall of mutual dreams.

Noah could have floated on the flood of space books currently available. Epic Rivalry is the place to dip your oar. It's the core of the whole story. If you are old enough to remember or young enough to wonder, Epic Rivalry is your book and Hardesty and Eisman your always illuminating guides.
Anasius
Overall, I thought this book was somewhat shallow, with little "meat" to fully engage the reader. It's an OK overview for someone who really didn't know much about rocket development/space programs from the 40's to the early 70's.

I found the discussion of German rocket development during WWII the most interesting part, and learned a few things about the Russian space efforts that I hadn't heard before. The discussion of the US space program was fairly mundane. If you followed the news during that period of time you'll already know most of what's presented here.
Naktilar
This should be a good book, but disappoints in both the quantity and quality of its coverage of the great power rivalry for the dominance of space.

It starts well, with an first-person account by Sergei Kruschchev of the first Sputniks. Kruschchev had a unique vantage point on the whole affair, as a technically knowledgeable person with an insider's pass on the political affairs of the Soviet Union. The first chapter or so, on the WW II German effort is worthwhile as well.

From that point it deteriorates rapidly into superficial re-hashes of old news, poorly presented. I started working on an errata, but gave up after averaging one a page for twenty pages. Some are slipups on minor facts: page 159 map referring to "Kennedy Space Flight Center", or using the acronym "LEM", which was discarded in the early 60's, or saying that the Cape was scorpion infested. Some are bad editing, leading to incorrect statements: p. 249 "Mir, which remained in orbit between 1971 and 2001". Some are failures to globally edit, e.g. telling the tale of the renaming of Cape Canaveral twice. There's also a problem of scope: at times it can't decide if it wants to be about the 50s and 60s or today. This on top of being full of technical groaners too numerous to count, like constantly calling RP-1 "volatile" or completely missing the point on why Gemini used ejection seats rather than an escape tower.

A single volume account of the most turbulent days of the space effort would be welcome; sadly, this isn't it. I wish I could even recommend it as an introduction, to be followed immediately by something more in-depth, but it's so full of inaccuracies I would be doing the reader a disservice. For the interested reader, "Apollo" by Murray and Cox, and "Red Star in Orbit" by James Oberg will readably take you through the two sides, are much more thorough and technically correct, and both rated 5 stars by hordes of readers. They will take you three times as long to read, but you will ultimately profit by not having to unlearn any thing later.
Ienekan
Not a very thorough book. The fact that the book was written by two authors is prominent and the same facts and the same stories are repeated in different chapters.