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ISBN:1934009520
Author: Kay Burke
ISBN13: 978-1934009529
Title: Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative
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ePUB size: 1509 kb
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Language: English
Category: Schools and Teaching
Publisher: Solution Tree (February 25, 2010)
Pages: 176

Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative by Kay Burke



Diana said: This book is about the use of formative and summative assessment in classroom curriculum  . Start by marking Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Learn how to integrate formative and summative assessments seamlessly into instruction. Exercises at the end of each chapter provide opportunities to reflect and plan action steps. Kay’s most recent book published in March 2010 by Solution Tree Press is Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative.

Kay Burke has created a practical resource for busy practitioners. Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative provides a comprehensive overview of the critical role that assessments, both formative and summative, play in today s classrooms. Burke promotes the use of performance-based tasks that make real-life connections, and she explains how to use rubrics to assess the critical skills and understanding that the tasks target. Performance tasks also allow teachers to differentiate instruction and assessment to meet the needs of all learners, including advanced and beginning students and. Kay Burke states, "The goal of this book is to show teachers how to integrate both formative and summative assessment" (1). There are 8 chapters in total. She defines formative assessment on page 21 and summative assessment on page 23. Books related to Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative.

In her book, Balanced Assessment: From Formative to Summative, renowned educator Kay Burke writes, The only feedback comes in the form of a letter grade, percentage grade, pass/fail grade, or label such as ‘exceeds standards’ or ‘needs improvement. Let’s say chapter one in the math textbook has three subchapters (. In other words, formative methods are an assessment for learning whereas summative ones are an assessment of learning. Now that you’ve got a more thorough understanding of these evaluations, let’s dive into the love-hate relationship teachers like yourself may have with summative assessments. Perceived disadvantages of summative assessment.

In Balanced Assessment, Kay Burke shows teachers how to "begin with the end in mind"-to start with the expectations for student achievement and then work backward from them to help all students succeed. She explains a process of analyzing the standards, deciding precisely what knowledge and skills will have to be taught and assessed, and then planning instruction to prepare students to demonstrate that they have met or exceeded the standards.

Bloomington : Solution Tree. 2. Balanced assessment : from formative to summative. Bloomington, IN : Solution Tree Press. 4. 3. Little vs large.

Today, standards what students must know and be able to do are the starting point for all curriculum and instruction. In Balanced Assessment, Kay Burke shows teachers how to begin with the end in mind to start with the expectations for student achievement and then work backward from them to help all students succeed. She explains a process of analyzing the standards, deciding precisely what knowledge and skills will have to be taught and assessed, and then planning instruction to prepare students to demonstrate that they have met or exceeded the standards. Balanced assessment means integrating both formative and summative assessments seamlessly into instruction. This book makes clear that the distinction between the two types of assessment is not as rigid as many people believe. In fact, Dr. Burke explains that the very same assessment can be both formative and summative, depending on when it is administered and the purpose for which it is used. Formative assessments are administered frequently during a learning segment to provide feedback to both teachers and students about concepts and skills that students are having difficulty understanding or mastering. This feedback helps teachers modify and differentiate their instruction to help all students meet the standard. Summative assessments are administered at the end of a learning segment and are the final opportunity for students to demonstrate proficiency. Not all summative assessments are, as is often assumed, high-stakes state tests. Most are teacher created. Because each grade level or content area can have hundreds of standards, the best approach is for teachers to work together in teams to plan instruction and develop common assessments. The author describes the process teacher teams use to analyze the standards, develop engaging performance tasks that address the standards, and create two extremely versatile tools to assess student performance: checklists and rubrics. Both tools serve a dual function. They break down a process or task, such as writing a persuasive essay, into manageable steps for students to follow, and they provide feedback about a student s progress. Checklists reveal what students have yet to accomplish to complete a task; rubrics, which give more detailed descriptions of levels of performance, show what they need to do to improve the quality of their work. Perhaps most significantly, both tools can help students assess their own performance and direct their own learning.
Reviews: 7
Hudora
One of the most useful teaching books I've ever purchased as a student. The templates are super useful in the classroom. Some books I sold back right away after completing the class--this is a keeper.
Delaath
One of the biggest challenges I have when I talk with faculty is the confusion of what is Formative and Summative assessment. This walks the reader through, and provides a wealth of information on how to conduct both For​mative and Summative assessments.
Hamrl
It answered many questions I had about assessments in a really easy manner.
All teachers need to read the book. It makes assessments fun to use.
Arabella V.
Awesome!!
Mozel
Very informative
Wel
Not what I expected but a good resource
Hanelynai
Bought this book for a class because it was required. We haven't really looked into it, hoping that we will use it more.
Kay Burke states, "The goal of this book is to show teachers how to integrate both formative and summative assessment" (1). There are 8 chapters in total. She defines formative assessment on page 21 and summative assessment on page 23.

I found Chapter 5 "Checklists: Progression of Learning" very useful. Checklists are helpful in allowing students to see their progress and to prove their learning in route to summative assessment. There are several illustration in which the student can check either "Yes" or "Not Yet." This checklist can be used as diagnostic tool at the beginning of new learning, as formative assessment proceeding through learning, or as summative assessment (79-80).

I found Chapter 7 "Formative Assessments Tools: Real Time and Real Fast" helpful. The chapter gives great ideas for formative assessment in real time and real fast. Examples are Sticky Note Exit Poster, Top-Ten List, The Human Rubric, Logs, Agree/Disagree Charts, Venn Diagrams.

Unfortunately, Burke does introduce some "fuzzy" thinking. Leaning on Shores (2009) she introduces formal and informal formative assessments. According to the author formal formative assessments "require a great deal of time and effort to create and implement, and they are often designed by teams of teachers as common assessments" (120). Formative assessments as described in Chapter 7 are "informal" formative assessment. I suppose if she were to write another book on assessment we could end up with a assessment continuum starting with informal formative assessment, formal formative assessment, informal semi-summative assessment, formal semi-summative assessment, informal summative assessment, formal summative assessment. The array can certainly be expanded.

In attempting to balance formative and summative assessments Burke has allowed for using formative assessments as summative assessments stating, "If the assignment focused on a less important curriculum goal or standard, the teacher could use the checklist as a summative assessment and record the final grade" (94). This is different than Ken O'Connor's recommendation as he writes, "Don't use information from formative assessments and practice to determine grades; use only summative evidence" A Repair Kit for Broken Grades (2007, p. 95). A Repair Kit for Grading: Fifteen Fixes for Broken Grades (Assessment Training Institute, Inc.) However O'Connor later equivocates on this point on page 103.

In fact, upon closer reading, we can find Burke stating, "They [teachers] need to know whether to use a point system, letter grades, or percentages and whether to eliminate zeroes and lowest grades or add bonus points and extra credit" (146). This is in contrast with O'Connor's view: "Don't give extra points or use bonus points: seek only evidence that more work has resulted in higher level of achievement." (2007, p. 31)

School districts developing assessment policies now have at least two positions to choose from writers: such as Kay Burke who are willing to settle for "fuzzy" thinking, or Ken O'Connor, whose views on assessment and grading are more rigorous thoigh not flawless. So far I do not see any way of reconciling the two positions. I hope in Kay Burke's next writing she will explicitly state her position on using "zeroes" in assessment practices. At this point, from her perspective, if you are going to allow for bonus points or extra credit, then socially "zeroes" are required at the other extreme of achievement.

Dr. John Merks
Teacher
Riverview High School
Riverview
New Brunswick
Canada