Download A Good Dog epub book
ISBN:1428115218
Author: Tom Stechschulte,Jon Katz
ISBN13: 978-1428115217
Title: A Good Dog
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ePUB size: 1449 kb
FB2 size: 1852 kb
DJVU size: 1833 kb
Category: Pets and Animal Care
Publisher: RecordedBooks (2007)

A Good Dog by Tom Stechschulte,Jon Katz



From the moment Katz and Orson meet, when the dog springs from his traveling crate at Newark airport and panics the baggage claim area, their relationship is deep, stormy, and loving. At two years old, Katz’s new companion is a great herder of school buses, a scholar of refrigerators, but a dud at herding sheep

This Author: Jon Katz. This Narrator: Tom Stechschulte. This Publisher: Recorded Books. A Good Dog. The Story of Orson Who Changed My Life. From the moment Katz and Orson meet, when the dog springs from his traveling crate at Newark airport and panics the baggage claim area, their relationship is deep, stormy, and loving. At two years old, Katzís new companion is a great herder of school buses, a scholar of refrigerators, but a dud at herding sheep.

Written by Jon Katz, Audiobook narrated by Tom Stechschulte. With its endearing blend of humor, wisdom, and insight, Soul of a Dog, by New York Times best-selling author Jon Katz, illuminates the interaction between humans and animals.

Читает Tom Stechschulte. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. At two years old, Katz's new companion is a great herder of school buses, a scholar of refrigerators, but a dud at herding sheep.

Unabridged AUDIOBOOK. Audiobook Narrator: Tom Stechschulte. Length: 6 hours and 18 min. Release Date: 08-JAN-07. Download Now View Coupon.

Written By: Jon Katz. Narrated By: Tom Stechschulte. Publisher: Recorded Books.

Narrated by Tom Stechschulte. The Story of Orson, Who Changed My Life. Narrated by Tom Stechschulte. You have this audiobook. Listen to your audiobook on Apple (iOS) or Android phones and tablets.

Listen to this book for FREE when you try Audible. Also his training methods are his own, and good for him. There is no one right way to train every dog, or even every dog of a given breed. I love how Katz studies the animal, analyzes the situation, and listens to the advice of people he thinks are smarter than him. Katz writes beautifully. I feel privileged to live in his life between the covers of each book.

While Katz is trying to help his dog, Orson is helping him, shepherding him toward a new life on a hillside farm in upstate New York. There, with deep love, each embraces his unfolding destiny. A Good Dog is a book to savor.

From the moment Katz and Orson meet, when the dog springs from his traveling crate at Newark airport and panics the baggage claim area, their relationship is deep, stormy, and loving. At two years old, Katz’s new companion is a great herder of school buses, a scholar of refrigerators, but a dud at herding sheep. Just as Orson was the author’s lifetime dog, his story is a lifetime treasure†poignant, timeless, and powerful. uploaded (Part 1) uploaded (Part 2) uploaded (Part 3) uploaded (Part 4).

Book by Jon Katz
Reviews: 7
Doukree
The thing I like best about this book is the author uses force free training. It's a joy to hear of his successes (and challenges) and how Orson changed his outlook on life.
Painbrand
Love the story. Pained that Jon had to destroy his very special protector.
Dellevar
How can killing your dog who loves and trusts you ever be an option, and then you write a book about if to profit from it? Wow, I lost a lot of respect for Katz after reading this book. He had 40 acres and a ton of money but he decides that killing his dog was the best choice, how about you try building a pen that could hold him. Seems like Katz killed Orson because having him around was no longer convenient for him. Very sad. RIP Orson.
Wen
If you love dog books like I do, Jon Katz is your go to Author!!! Read them all!
Bil
Delightful author, tells a good story.
Prorahun
A Good Dog by Jon Katz. As usual Jon Katz managed to annoy the hell out of me so why do I persist in reading his dog stories? I guess I hope he'll eventually have some insight on his relationships with canines, and occasionally he makes steps in this direction recognizing that the acquisition of border collies was a springboard to a change in life for a man bored with his suburban existence. Fair enough. Katz' Labs weren't providing that challenge so he obtained a known problem: Devon, on the recommendation of a sheepherding trainer (what was she thinking...and cynically, despite Katz oblivious genuflections to all his mentors, I think the answer is money). Devon is of course a demon, a hyperactive mischief maker and Katz becomes the worst possible master constantly citing how Devon--renamed Orson on the advice of a mentor who says "Devon" has bad vibes for the dog from his previous life--dashes from his yard to "herd" school buses -and schoolchildren, challenges skateboarders, slips his leash, collar, whatever. Katz! Pay attention to the damn dog.
But Katz is always in a reverie, falling down due to his "bad leg" which becomes a "bad back"--that the 100 or so extra pounds he carries might have something to do with that never seems to occur to him. So Orson inspires Katz to purchase an upstate New York farm, a flock of sheep for Orson to terrorize and assorted other critters. Soon Katz acquires Rose, who proves to be an accomplished border collie, a worker not a pet and Orson is retired to the pet category which also is not a success. Katz spends a small fortune on vets, alternative vets, dog whisperers and shamans to no avail, but it all contributes to fodder for the book he's writing. Orson's behavior further deteriorates. Having bitten three people, now Katz determines Orson is "dangerous" and his moral duty, after considering the options of retraining--too much effort--more physical and mental testing--too expensive--confining Orson (Here Katz really irritates me as he posits that to pen Orson in an actual enclosure that he could not escape would be "like imprisonment"--do let's poll human death row inhabitants on which alternative they would prefer). But Katz has made his moral decision. Death is the only solution he says as he babbles on about the wonderful support the vet (who actually sounds somewhat dubious) is providing. Then once Orson is safely dead he can become that "good dog" and Katz compounds this by having visions and spiritual visitations where Orson thanks him for bringing him peace. Katz concludes that Destiny brought him Orson to gift him with his new way of life. Katz is a master of self-regard and self-delusion while posing as genuinely self-critical. He rejects conventional training as "not right for rebellious spirits like him and Orson."
Poor Orson whose fate illustrates the axiom "the only good dog is a dead dog."
Rainpick
As the owner of two herding dogs, I know first hand how hard it is to train them well and keep them out of trouble. I thoroughly enjoyed the first 3/4 of this book, and for that I will give it two stars. But what a waste of a vacation day I felt I spent reading this when I got to the end of the story. Poor Orson. How I wished he would have been retired to a home that knew the value of a leash, a dog run, and a crate. I will not be buying any other books from this author.
This man calls himself a dog trainer. Granted Devon/Orson came to him with problems, some of which he tried to solve by picking up the dog and throwing him. I've never read that in any training book. It seems that if he sticks to labs (stable ones) he can train dogs, if he ventures into the world of unstable border collies he is way out of his league. Not all border collies are sheep herders. Perhaps some of Orson's anxiety came from being forced to face his failures in sheep herding over and over again (kind of like kids whose fathers want them to play baseball even though their kids have no sports ability). Rosie was a success story but she came practially herding right out of the box so to speak. Then there was Homer who didn't quite measure up so he gave him away.

If you can't manage a dog like Orson on a farm, where can you manage him? And where does it say that those people had the right to swarm all over his farm uninvited?

Needless to say I was very disappointed with the book. I have six rescue dogs of my own, I know they aren't perfect and need work and to his credit Mr. Katz did seem to work with Orson, but some of his work did seem misguided.

The work with the Shaman was interesting but at the end it seemed like it was just thrown in to make him feel better. I won't be buying any more of his books.