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ISBN:1441786457
Author: Bronson Pinchot,Elizabeth Letts
ISBN13: 978-1441786456
Title: The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse That Inspired a Nation (Library Edition)
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ePUB size: 1615 kb
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Language: English
Category: Pets and Animal Care
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged LIBRARY edition (August 23, 2011)

The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse That Inspired a Nation (Library Edition) by Bronson Pinchot,Elizabeth Letts



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The Eighty-Dollar Champion tells the dramatic odyssey of a horse called Snowman, saved from the slaughterhouse by a young Dutch farmer named Harry. Together, Harry and Snowman went on to become America's show-jumping champions, winning first prize in Madison Square Garden. Set in the mid- to late-1950s, this book captures the can-do spirit of a Cold War immigrant who believed and triumphed" Provided by publisher. Rubrics: Snowman (Horse) Show jumpers (Horses) United States Biography Show horses.

Summary: The Eighty-Dollar Champion tells the dramatic odyssey of a horse called Snowman, saved from the slaughterhouse by a young Dutch farmer named Harry. Together, Harry and Snowman went on to become America’s show-jumping champions, winning first prize in Madison Square Garden. Set in the mid to late 1950s, this book captures the can-do spirit of a Cold War immigrant who believed-and triumphed -Provided by publisher.

Elizabeth Letts (Author), Bronson Pinchot (Narrator), Inc. Blackstone Audio (Publisher). Get this audiobook plus a second, free. I knew I was in for a treat when author Elizabeth Letts painted a vivid image of a dirty, flea-bitten nag looking through the board slats of a truck bound for the slaughter house at a man with only eighty dollars in his pocket-a man who needed a horse to train students to ride and jump horses at an all-girls.

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The Eighty-Dollar Champion book. Letts sprinkles the interesting bits of Harry de Leyer's life throughout the book, instead of building his character into something cohesive for the reader, this style seems to dilute the man and his accomplishments. Letts tells the reader nearly ad nauseam that Harry wanted to be his own man, that Snowman cleans up nicely but is no beauty and that Harry knew better than to be sentimental about a horse

Elizabeth Letts's message is simple: Never give up, even when the obstacles seem sky-high. There is something extraordinary in all of us. 'This is a wonderful book'joyous, heartfelt, and an eloquent reminder that hope can be found in the unlikeliest of places. 'Gwen Cooper, New York Times bestselling author. Please contact Member Services for additional documents. has successfully been added to your shopping cart.

An inspiring tale of a horse that beat the odds. Reminiscent of the inspiring, against-the-odds success story that made Seabiscuit a bestseller, The Eighty-Dollar Champion tells the dramatic odyssey of a horse called Snowman that, saved from the slaughterhouse, went on to become America's leading show jumper, winning first prize at Madison Square Garden. Set in the mid- to late 1950s, this book captures the can-do spirit of a Cold War immigrant who believed–and triumphed.

Main The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse That Inspired a Nation. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Sams Teach Yourself SQL in 24 Hours.

November 1958: the National Horse Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Into the rarefied atmosphere of wealth and tradition comes the most unlikely of horses-a drab white former plow horse named Snowman-and his rider, Harry de Leyer. Harry de Leyer first saw the horse he would name Snowman on a bleak winter afternoon between the slats of a rickety truck bound for the slaughterhouse. He recognized the spark in the eye of the beaten-up horse and bought him for eighty dollars. A Letter from Author Elizabeth Letts. A writer is always on the lookout for a good story, but the first time I saw a striking old photograph, I didn’t realize that I had stumbled across a tale so extraordinary that it had the power to change lives. The old black and white photo showed a horse and rider team in the midst of a crazy feat-jumping right over the back of another horse.

An inspiring tale of a horse that beat the odds. Reminiscent of the inspiring, against-the-odds success story that made Seabiscuit a bestseller, The Eighty-Dollar Champion tells the dramatic odyssey of a horse called Snowman that, saved from the slaughterhouse, went on to become America's leading show jumper, winning first prize at Madison Square Garden. Set in the mid- to late 1950s, this book captures the can-do spirit of a Cold War immigrant who believed--and triumphed.
Reviews: 7
Ger
This book is great - we are using it for a book club for special needs adults, as it is such an inspirational story.

Personally, Snowman's story inspired me to become a marathon runner (when I had never run before in my life) at the ripe old age of 58 - this was four years ago - which is why I recommended it to the book club as a book they would want to use. I may be the last marathoner to cross the finish line, but I've crossed 16 of them now - and that is despite my diabetes, arthritis, and the fact that I have cancer that is currently in remission. Four years ago, when running a marathon was just a dream of mine, I took strength from Snowman's story. It's hard to explain why. I was so weighted down with the depression that having cancer can cause, I guess I needed something positive in my life.
Grinin
Saw this sign in a catalog the other day: "I want to be the man my horse thinks I am." A very, very, worthy ambition.

This true story of a horse named Snowman was recommended by friends.I probably would not have read it without their suggestion because I knew nothing about show jumping (I know quite a bit now).

This book, however, is about more than an equestrian event that a lot of us think is the province of the elite. It's about triumph over adversity against all odds. It's about the unique and unusual bond that can be formed between man and animal.

I knew I was in for a treat when author Elizabeth Letts painted a vivid image of a dirty, flea-bitten nag looking through the board slats of a truck bound for the slaughter house at a man with only eighty dollars in his pocket--a man who needed a horse to train students to ride and jump horses at an all-girls school. The horse and man saw something in each other's eyes.

Sound overdone? Romanticized? Too sentimental? By the time I reached the part where Snowman shows up in his former owner's yard dragging an old tire and a piece of board fence, I was hooked on this story and this horse.

Maybe it's because my grandfather's horse returned in a similar fashion. I'll never forget the day he came back more than a month after being sold and taken more than a hundred miles away. But that's another story. That was Buddy. This is about Snowman.

I have always been fascinated by theories about an animal's ability to reason and love their human masters. I am still just a wannabe cowboy, but I was raised around horses and there have been only short periods in my life when I did not own at least one (I still own one today).

Most of the stories we hear about humans bonding with animals have been romanticized to the point of becoming pure fiction. Letts is careful not to do that. By sticking to the facts and careful detail of how this relationship develops, readers can believe in something that we all want to believe (and most of us want to achieve).

It is one of the ironies of life (at least mine) that we often learn how things should be done after it is too late (or we are too old). Also, I find it fascinating that we all have aha moments when we are trying to master a skill, a subject, or a relationship--those moments when we read or hear the exact words that explain something that has been confusing before. Even the best of teachers don't always speak to all students.

Some of us listen and absorb in different ways. I have had many aha moments with horses. One was when I read that a woman's heart rate will match a horse's within sixty seconds after putting a hand on the horse. That simple revelation spoke volumes to me.

I discovered by trial and error that my horse would do just about what I expected of him. If I expected bad behavior when we team-roped, I got it and vice-versa. Even though there were many hits and misses, the discovery came in an "aha!" moment.

I concluded at first that the horse was just reacting to my physical movements--the way I sat in the saddle, the way my legs relaxed or tensed, the way my hands held the reins. However, I came to believe that it was also a mental thing.

When you ride and train a horse almost every day, he learns your moods, can read the expression on your face, and can correctly analyze every gesture. People generally know that about dogs and smaller pets, but not so much about horses. I now think that animals also communicate on a much higher mental and emotional level than I first thought.

I have been to a lot of horse training clinics and watched a lot of videos where the trainer tries to get this point across. But few ever come right out and say how they are communicating on a silent, mental level with the horse in addition to sounds and physical movements. Some are just not articulate enough, but most are doing something that comes natural to them. That may not realize that is not natural to everyone, but can be learned by most. This book proves the point.

Although the bonding between Harry le Feyer and Snowman develops through trial and error, failure and success, this is not a clinical description of training. There is definitely something intangible working between Snowman and Harry (a mental, emotional thing).

A survivor of Nazi-occupied Holland of WWII, this immigrant farmer, husband and father has a background that also makes the story more believable and more emotional. The pair develops what we all want to feel and share. You will soar inside the head of Harry and Snowman as well as over the jumps as they achieve the near-impossible. Go Down Looking
Nalmezar
LOVE THIS BOOK! Not only is it an amazing story all on its own, but Elizabeth Letts does a masterful job putting the story into historical and social context. You truly get a picture of what was happening in the world after WWII, as America and Europe were rebuilding their countries. It also provides insight into what it was like to be an immigrant and build a new life in America. And how sports were changing according to new prosperity and new audiences. And how television changed sports -- and us. It was fascinating to read how she became intrigued by a photograph and how that inspired her to research and write this book...which also inspired a movie. This book is well-written and the photographs are terrific.
Kerdana
The Eighty-Dollar Champion

As a little girl growing up in Harlem in the 1950s, peddlers in horse-drawn wagons were always a happy sighting. Elizabeth Letts' book, “The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, The Horse that Inspired a Nation,” took me back to those days, when horses were still part of both rural, and urban life.

The setting for Letts’ feel-good horse story is Long Island, NY, right after WWII. The main character, Harry de Leyer, a Dutch immigrant and Snowman’s owner, reminded me of another hardworking European immigrant. His name was Abe and he sold vegetables on our street, from his wagon, and treated his gentle horse like a prince. In the late 1950s, it wasn’t uncommon for men like Abe and Harry de Leyer to make a living, and a new life, in their new country, with the help of a horse.

Harry and his talented and plucky horse loved competing annually in the National Horse Show, at Madison Square Garden. During the 1950s, I too loved my yearly visits to the Garden to see the Barnum and Bailey Circus. Letts’ description of the Garden was right-on, especially when she says: “For all the glory upstairs in the Garden, the basement was a sorry excuse for a stabling area. The ventilation was famously poor, and made worse by people who ignored the no smoking rule.” “This,” she adds, was also where they housed… “nervous, high strung horses who paw the dirt in their narrow, constricted stables.”

The actual circus, like the Horse Show, performed upstairs in the arena, but a circus fan’s first stop was always in the cramped basement to see the sideshow. And, just as the Horse Show’s expensive thoroughbreds and jumpers lived in the basement, the circus animals were also boarded down there. Each year I’d see the elephants changed by their ankles, lethargic bears, and riled up lions and tigers nervously pacing in small cages.

America was not always a happy place during the Cold War era, but once readers get past Letts’ troubling description of animal quarters at Madison Square Garden, “The Eighty Dollar Champion” takes you to a happier place.