» » Chinese Cash: Identification and Price Guide
Download Chinese Cash: Identification and Price Guide epub book
ISBN:087341859X
Author: David Jen
ISBN13: 978-0873418591
Title: Chinese Cash: Identification and Price Guide
Format: lit docx lrf lrf
ePUB size: 1246 kb
FB2 size: 1704 kb
DJVU size: 1566 kb
Language: English
Category: Antiques and Collectibles
Publisher: Krause Pubns Inc; 1st edition (January 1, 2000)
Pages: 341

Chinese Cash: Identification and Price Guide by David Jen



David Jen's book is a nice update to the Schjoth and "Fisher's Ding" catalogs for those who only read English, but anyone serious about Chinese coinage must read Chinese, and will instead use the Daxi. In sum, for the collector who only speaks English, this is a good supplement to the Schjoth and Fisher's Ding

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Chinese Cash: Identification And Price Guide as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author David Jen is one of the leading experts in Chinese currency and is well respected in both the United States and Asia. In addition, the book includes many newly discovered varieties not listed in any other reference source. Download from free file storage.

Identification and Price Guide. David Jen. Krause Publications, 2000. extensively illustrated throughout. around ?30 in the . Finally there are the usual tables of dynasties, emperors and reign titles et. unfortunately not without uncorrected errors. The first, and longest, section of the catalogue is devoted to the "mainstream dynastic issues" with accompanying notes.

4951 21. Personal Name: Jen, David. Publication, Distribution, et. Iola, Wis. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Chinese cash : identification and price guide, David Jen. online for free.

com Product Description (ISBN 087341859X, Paperback). Comprehensive overview of more than 3,000 years of Chinese cash coins. Features values and multiple condition grades on a variety of monetary forms issued in Imperial China. Includes many newly discovered varieties not listed in any other reference, with historical references and production details.

Jigsaw Puzzles: An Illustrated History and Price Guide. Pring on Price Patterns : The Definitive Guide to Price Pattern Analysis and Intrepretation. Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila (Chinese Overseas). Antique Trader Cameras and Photographica Price Guide.

At long last there is a collector's guide that provides a comprehensive overview of the complex, but fascinating world of Chinese cash coins. Covering more than 3,000 years of numismatic history, this long-awaited volume lists, illustrates and values in multiple condition grades a variety of monetary forms issued in Imperial China. Author David Jen is one of the leading experts in Chinese currency and is well respected in both the United States and Asia. His new work is by far the most complete volume available on the topic, offering history and production details for thousands of issues. In addition, the book includes many newly discovered varieties not listed in any other reference source.
Reviews: 7
Saberdragon
This is a useful refrence when identification of coinage is needed , what was not included were any of the paper bank notes or government issued bills one would think of in terms of cash ? Never the less , the information contained within is very useful and will serve as a guide to identifying what would otherwise be a time consuming task in comparing . Would recommend for coins ID
Kaim
There are several major problems with this work:

1. Starting at page 131 and continuing to page 178, the illustration numbers do not match the numbers mentioned in the text. Thus, for example you will read that "The Tianming coins (Nos. 644-5) were cast by Nurhaci in AD 1616" but illustration numbers 644 and 645 (and the catalogue numbers too) actually refer to Ming rebel coins. No more than annoying if you recognize the characters for "tian ming" and find the correct illustration, but this defect will be a serious impediment to those who don't read Chinese.

2. Pricing system is poorly explained. Jen tell us that his prices are "based on the current Chinese market conditions" but says that the reader cannot expect that a coin available in China for 10 yuan could still be purchased for that price in the US. He also notes that a coin valued at 1000 dollars in China should probably sell at around 3000 dollars in the US. With that Jen ends his price discussion, leaving the reader to wonder whether the values given in the book are the prices to be found in China, or China-based prices with the expected mark-up for US sale included.

3. no citation of sources - ANYWHERE.

4. no coin weights or weight ranges.

5. history articles are written with an outdated Han nationalist bias. Learn how peasants chafed under the yoke of alien rule. Anti Yuan rebels strike "a common chord with freedom-loving people everywhere" - we have to hope we're not talking about Ming Taizu. The Taiping rebellion is presented as an ethnic freedom fight against Manchu oppressors, a false start on the road to the overdue revolution of 1911.

Still, updated types and realistic prices make this a useful work.
Nafyn
Good book but not easy to understand / follow even for a numismatist. It does have good pictures but not nearly enough of them. I don't recommend it if you are new at China coins, you will get lost and frustrated.
It has potential to be a great book if it was revised well.
Flarik
David Jen, an American citizen who spent much of the 20th century living in China, is a volunteer assistant at the American Numsimatics Society, the world's leading insitute for the study and conservation of coins. As a paid employee of the ANS, I would like to stress that the ANS does not endorse this work directly, and the following are my own opinions.
Many collectors have primarily worked from one of four works in Western languages: the catalog of Terrien de Lacouperie, F. Schjoth, the George Fisher translation of the Ding Fubao collection, or the Arthur Coole series. Although there is much merit in all of these works, very few of them work with the economic history of China and are far more concerned with the aesthetics of the coins they collect. Primarily interest has centered on the spade and knife coinages during the Zhou period. Jen's work instead concentrates on coins that have a primary place within the economy, and key variants upon those coins. It is a much smaller catalog than the 6-volume Coole, which cannot be used easily, and I do not believe Mr Jen attempted to supplant the Ding Fubao or Schjoth catalogs.
However, I am distressed that none of the readers have noted that there are fine catalogs now in the Chinese and Japanese languages, which are truly most important. The 12-volume Daxi catalog, published by the Shanghai Museum, is the standard reference work for Asian numismatists, which far supplants the Ding Fubao or Schjoth. In addition, it appears that French is no longer a reference language for numismatists, because the fine work of Francois Thierry of the Bibliotheque National is completely omitted in reviews.
David Jen's book is a nice update to the Schjoth and "Fisher's Ding" catalogs for those who only read English, but anyone serious about Chinese coinage must read Chinese, and will instead use the Daxi. Thierry's many researches are important, and as his catalogs tend to represent hoards, are important for their economic significance. In sum, for the collector who only speaks English, this is a good supplement to the Schjoth and Fisher's Ding. In that sense it is an important addition to any numismatic library, but it does not supplant these earlier texts, nor do I think it was intended to do so. Serious scholars of Chinese numsimatic history may wish to use it for its variants of some Chinese coins, but their research is likely to be more profitable in working with the standard catalogs instead...