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Download Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition epub book
ISBN:0439819776
Author: Lizzy Rockwell
ISBN13: 978-0439819770
Title: Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition
Format: lrf doc azw mobi
ePUB size: 1524 kb
FB2 size: 1331 kb
DJVU size: 1144 kb
Language: English
Category: Special Diet
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc. (1999)

Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition by Lizzy Rockwell



Good Enough to Eat is one of a kind: the only guide to kids' nutrition written especially for kids. Good Enough to Eat is an excellent starting point for educating young children (ages 4-7) about nutrition. It has happy and inviting illustrations and introduces basic concepts such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. The book feels a bit dated but is still very useful for starting the conversation. I would not recommend this book for educating an older child about nutrition science but I would recommend it to parents who want help in persuading a young child of the importance of healthy eating. 2 people found this helpful.

Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition. From Harper Collins, 1999. This book offers all the basics found in an adult nutrition guide in a format designed specifically for kids. Lizzy Rockwell has filled GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT with funny speech bubbles, detailed illustrations, and an engaging cast of children who explain everything from why your body needs protein to how long it takes to burn 100 calories

Good Enough to Eat book. Good Enough to Eat: A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition.

Good Enough to Eat is one of a kind: the only guide to kids' nutrition written especially for kids. In this book, you will learn: All about the nutrient, protein, fat, water, vitamins, and mineralseach nutrient's functionwhich foods contain which nutrientshow much of each nutrient a kid needs each dayhow the body digests foodall about calories

Good Enough to Eat. A Kid's Guide to Food and Nutrition. illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell. how much of each nutrient a kid needs each day. how the body digests food.

Good Enough to Eat is not like many books written about children’s nutrition for one main reason; it’s actually written for kids! Using beautiful illustrations and a family setting to introduce many of the concepts, Good Enough to Eat serves as an introduction to healthy eating for children. It explains how our bodies work, and the importance of a balanced diet. For this reason, Good Enough to Eat is often used by educators as well as parents as an introduction to nutritional eating. The book is well laid out, and the illustrations of parents and children in different situations help to explain the concepts being discussed. As an example, the book explains what protein is necessary for, has a child speaking an additional sentence on the importance of protein in real terms, and gives examples of foods that provide us with protein.

Good Enough to Eat: A Kid’s Guide to Food and Nutrition, by Lizzy Rockwell (ages 4 to 9). This books shows, in a kid-friendly way, the importance of eating a balanced diet, the process of digestion, nutrients and their functions. The Kid's Cookbook has 40 recipes. From cupcakes, Blueberry Muffins to a Classic Turkey Club, from grown-up Fettuccine Alfredo to Brownie and Ice Cream Sandwiches, this book is bursting with imaginative recipes that have tons of kid-appeal! Kids’ Fun and Healthy Cookbook, by Nicola Graimes (ages 7 to 12). Encourages kids to consider what they eat and how it affects their bodies. With more than 100 recipes, from yummy interpretations of classics to brand-new ideas-this book can help turn eating into a delicious treat.

Paperback, Scholastic Edition
Reviews: 7
Ces
My kid (4) does tend to like non-fiction, so this facts-heavy book was fine for him. That being said, other reviews are correct: this book is DEFINITELY outdated. It emphasizes processed carbohydrates as the "main source of energy in our diet" (pretty sure it never mentions whole grains), and demonizes fats while glossing over the problems of too much sugar.

I like some of this book (the specific information on what benefits different kinds of foods offer was good), but it doesn't work well as a "big picture" book for educating kids on nutritional needs.
Qusicam
Ok so the page I am referring to has pictures of cereal, bagels, ect. All super processed foods.
The book goes through fruits and veggies & different forms of protein explaining the nutrients you receive and what part of your body it feeds. I love this about the book. However, when it gets to the page saying you get all of your energy from things like cereal and bagels it doesn't look right. The kiddos are only looking at the pictures also. I am going to try a book on just veggies because I just don't agree with the "pyramid"
Doulkree
I guess this is my fault , I love the series and I loved the idea of a book. I should have known I just wasn't going to like a mass produced , approved for the masses nutrition book . I am not a big fan of pushing carbs as your main scource of food energy ,I don't think healthy fats are demons in disguise ect . With that being said there was some sound learning moments here .... I'm just afraid to read it again lest my daughter get the wrong idea about other things.
Butius
This book has a very food table view of nutrition that might work for some families but we are family that feels food is medicine and I'm not fond of how this book emphasizes the consumption of wheat and dairy. Not saying you should never eat them, they just should not be a large portion of a healing regenerative healthful diet.
Balladolbine
My wife likes this book, and the kids actually remembered some of the stuff they learned from it, so win - win.
Cobyno
I used this book for Bibe Camp this past summer (2017). The illustrations were perfect. It kept the children's attention (ages 3-9) and some of them are still reciting the content to me. It was very informative and educational.
Orevise
Good Enough to Eat is an excellent starting point for educating young children (ages 4-7) about nutrition. It has happy and inviting illustrations and introduces basic concepts such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. The book feels a bit dated but is still very useful for starting the conversation. I would not recommend this book for educating an older child about nutrition science but I would recommend it to parents who want help in persuading a young child of the importance of healthy eating.
Children love it. This was a gift to a childcare center for the children to learn about nutrition. They love it and want to read or hear it read over and over.