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ISBN:1558495126
Author: Arlene Voski Avakian,Barbara Haber
ISBN13: 978-1558495128
Title: From Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives on Women and Food
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ePUB size: 1640 kb
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Language: English
Category: Regional and International
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (November 29, 2005)
Pages: 312

From Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives on Women and Food by Arlene Voski Avakian,Barbara Haber



University of Massachusetts Press Amherst & Boston. Despite the fact of women’s centrality to food practices, until the last decade, few in this plethora of new works on food focused on women, and only a minority of those had a feminist analysis. Avakian’s anthology, Through the Kitchen Window: Women Writers Explore the Intimate Meanings of Food and Cooking (1997, 1998), was among the first to address the varied and complex aspects of women and food, and many of the pieces consider the possibility that, like the gardens of poor southern African American women which served as an outlet for their creativity when no other.

I. Avakian, Arlene Voski. When Barbara Haber developed the large cookbook collection at the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, many feminists and women’s studies scholars were not supportive of her interest in these works. Cookbooks, they argued, were a mark of women’s oppression and should not be collected in a major American library committed to the history of American women. The idea that cookbooks are documents of women’s history, a perspective that seems so obvious now, was not generally accepted when Haber made this argument in the 1970s.

Feminist Food Studies: A Brief History. Arlene Voski Avakian and Barbara Haber. The study of food, cooking, and eating, once a subject limited to nutritionists and a few anthropologists studying the symbolic importance of foodways among natives, ¹ has expanded to include sociology, history, philosophy, economics, and the interdisciplinary fields of Women’s Studies, American Studies and Cultural Studies  . Providing food for family and friends has always been the traditional work of women. Privileged women were not exempt from overseeing family meals, although they could pass on these duties to hired help-usually women.

Barbara Haber is former curator of books at the Schlesinger Library, and is author of From Hardtack to Homefries: An Uncommon History of American Cooks and Meals. students of culinary and feminist studies won't want to miss the unusual history (in this book). All titles are published by: University Press Audiobooks an imprint of Redwood Audiobooks.

Vietnamese Food & Cooking: Discover th. .

Missing, however, has been a focused effort to use gender as an analytic tool. This stimulating coll In recent years, scholars from a variety of disciplines have turned their attention to food to gain a better understanding of history, culture, economics, and society.

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Your audiobook is waitin. rom Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies. Critical Perspectives on Women and Food. By: Arlene Voski Avakian, Barbara Haber. Narrated by: Margaret Durante. Length: 11 hrs and 29 mins.

College-level students of culinary and feminist studies won't want to miss the unusual history in From Betty Crocker To Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives On Women And Food: it gathers scholarly essays from a range of disciplines to address issues of economics, society and culture in food history, using gender as its foundation. Thirteen essays are arranged under four headings by history, representations, marketplace and resistances, following the history of scholarly food writing and feminist food studies. From studies on the influence of large corporations in determining what.

In From Betty Crocker to Feminist Food Studies: Critical Perspectives on Women and Food, eds. A. Avakian and B. Haber. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, pp. 200-217. v The discussion of migrant and indigenous women draws upon my essay on Gender in Food Words: essays in culinary culture (Meah, 2013b).

In recent years, scholars from a variety of disciplines have turned their attention to food to gain a better understanding of history, culture, economics, and society. The emerging field of food studies has yielded a great deal of useful research and a host of publications. Missing, however, has been a focused effort to use gender as an analytic tool. This stimulating collection of original essays addresses that oversight, investigating the important connections between food studies and women's studies.

Applying the insights of feminist scholarship to the study of food, the thirteen essays in this volume are arranged under four headings -- the marketplace, histories, representations, and resistances. The editors open the book with a substantial introduction that traces the history of scholarly writing on food and maps the terrain of feminist food studies. In the essays that follow, contributors pay particular attention to the ways in which gender, race, ethnicity, class, colonialism, and capitalism have both shaped and been shaped by the production and consumption of food.

In the first section, four essays analyze the influence of large corporations in determining what came to be accepted as proper meals in the United States, including what mothers were expected to feed their babies. The essays in the second section explore how women have held families together by keeping them nourished, from the routines of an early nineteenth-century New Englander to the plight of women who endured the siege of Leningrad.

The essays in the third section focus on the centrality of gender and race in the formation of identities as enacted through food discourse and practices. These case studies range from the Caribbean to the San Luis Valley of Colorado. The final section documents acts of female resistance within the contexts of national or ethnic oppression. From women in colonial India to Armenian American feminists, these essays show how food has served as a means to assert independence and personal identity.

In addition to the editors, contributors include Amy Bentley, Carole M. Counihan, Darra Goldstein, Nancy Jenkins, Alice P. Julier, Leslie Land, Laura Lindenfield, Beheroze F. Shroff, Sharmila Sen, Laura Shapiro, and Jan Whitaker.