» » Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail
Download Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail epub book
ISBN:1603582509
Author: Gary Paul Nabhan,Kraig Kraft
ISBN13: 978-1603582506
Title: Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail
Format: mbr azw mobi lrf
ePUB size: 1955 kb
FB2 size: 1707 kb
DJVU size: 1821 kb
Language: English
Category: Cooking Education and Reference
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing (March 16, 2011)
Pages: 224

Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail by Gary Paul Nabhan,Kraig Kraft



Chasing Chiles looks at both the future of place-based foods and the effects of climate change on agriculture through the lens of the chile pepper-from the farmers who cultivate this iconic crop to the cuisines and cultural traditions in which peppers play a huge role. Why chile peppers? Both a spice and a vegetable, chile peppers have captivated imaginations and taste buds for thousands of years. Chasing Chiles is not your archetypal book about climate change, with facts and computer models delivered by a distant narrator. On the contrary, these three dedicated chileheads look and listen, sit down to eat, and get stories and recipes from on the ground-in farmers' fields, local cafes, and the desert-scrub hillsides across North America.

Personal Name: Nabhan, Gary Paul. Rubrics: Hot peppers Climatic factors Endangered plants United States Mexico. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Chasing chiles : hot spots along the pepper trail, Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft, and Gary Paul Nabhan.

Chasing Chiles looks at both the future of place-based foods and the effects of climate change on agriculture through the lens of the chile pepper-from the farmers who cultivate this iconic crop to the cuisines and cultural traditions in which peppers play a huge role.

Chasing Chiles - Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail. Author’s Kurt Friese, Kraig Kraft, and Gray Nabhan make their own offering to the field with their recent title Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail with a new take on the food book.

Chasing Chiles - Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail By Gary Paul Nabhan torrent. Chasing Chiles - Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail By Gary Paul Nabhan. English 146 pages EPUB . 0 MB. - To avoid fakes, ALWAYS check that the torrent was added on ExtraTorrent.

Chasing Chiles is truly one of the most inspiring and unique treatments of climate change in current literature. The book provides us with an entirely fresh and critical perspective on this contentious issue directly from farmers and chefs, focusing on one particular crop. And the proposed solution to this complex problem is both plain and prudent: 'Eat and farm as if the earth matters,' as we should have been doing all along. Author's Kurt Friese, Kraig Kraft, and Gray Nabhan make their own offering to the field with their recent title Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail with a new take on the food book.

Chasing Chiles - Hot Spots along the Pepper Trail By Gary Paul Nabhan. epub (. MB). Description.

Kurt Michael Friese, Kraig Kraft, Gary Paul Nabhan. Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail.

Gary Paul Nabhan; Kraig Kraft; Kurt Michael Friese. Walmart 9781603582506. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Chasing Chiles : Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail. Gary Paul Nabhan; Kraig Kraft; Kurt Michael Friese. Book Format: Choose an option.

Chasing Chiles looks at both the future of place-based foods and the effects of climate change on agriculture through the lens of the chile pepper-from the farmers who cultivate this iconic crop to the cuisines and cultural traditions in which peppers play a huge role.

Why chile peppers? Both a spice and a vegetable, chile peppers have captivated imaginations and taste buds for thousands of years. Native to Mesoamerica and the New World, chiles are currently grown on every continent, since their relatively recent introduction to Europe (in the early 1500s via Christopher Columbus). Chiles are delicious, dynamic, and very diverse-they have been rapidly adopted, adapted, and assimilated into numerous world cuisines, and while malleable to a degree, certain heirloom varieties are deeply tied to place and culture-but now accelerating climate change may be scrambling their terroir.

Over a year-long journey, three pepper-loving gastronauts-an agroecologist, a chef, and an ethnobotanist-set out to find the real stories of America's rarest heirloom chile varieties, and learn about the changing climate from farmers and other people who live by the pepper, and who, lately, have been adapting to shifting growing conditions and weather patterns. They put a face on an issue that has been made far too abstract for our own good.

Chasing Chiles is not your archetypal book about climate change, with facts and computer models delivered by a distant narrator. On the contrary, these three dedicated chileheads look and listen, sit down to eat, and get stories and recipes from on the ground-in farmers' fields, local cafes, and the desert-scrub hillsides across North America. From the Sonoran Desert to Santa Fe and St. Augustine (the two oldest cities in the U.S.), from the marshes of Avery Island in Cajun Louisiana to the thin limestone soils of the Yucatan, this book looks at how and why climate change will continue to affect our palates and our producers, and how it already has.

Reviews: 7
blodrayne
Good read if you are interested in food, particularly chile. I think their approach to our ecological problems is somewhat naive. I don’t think any of their principles would be considered in 3rd world countries where subsistence is their main concern. It’s a book for affluent US and Western European readers who can sit around and pontificate about rather trivial concerns on the world stage. In my view the only chance we have to solve these ecological problems is population control.
Buzatus
First comment: this book was a wonderful--and sobering--look at climate change, as demonstrated by the effect on growing/harvesting chile peppers in the southern US and northern Mexico. Written from the perspective of the combined authors' varying experiences (one is a chef, for example), it made for a fascinating read.

It was also of great interest to me as a cook, because I really learned a lot about chiles, their use, differences between various types, how they are affected by the weather and lots of other interesting tidbits. And it was hysterical to read of the authors' foibles in their somewhat-less-than-new vehicle, as they traveled the dusty back roads in search of chiles, cooks and cold beer.
Malaris
My wife is thoroughly enjoying this book.
Gathris
Great book on Chiles, the cultures they come from, and the ecologies of their cultivation and origin, and how climate change and other changes over time have affected them all.
Ishnsius
Cleverly done
Ranterl
I was disappointed at the obvious bias towards global warming. The way the book was written authors had already made up their minds on the issue before they even went on the quest. The history of the peppers and some of the unique varieties that exist I found to be very informative and enjoyed that aspect of the book. With this publisher if you can get past their political slant, there are things that you can pick out of their books.
Kamick
I expected a cookbook with background; it's more like a history, background, and biology of chilies with a few incidental (and authentic) recipes. There is a lot of 'climate change' talk and it may veer into areas that not all agree with regarding our changing climate and the cause (or not) of such changes. There is a lot of personal contact with growers of chilies, in all it's reward and devastation of their lands. It puts a human face to the food we eat.

If you like the kind of book that is recipe-heavy with minimal history or background about dishes, this is not your book. If you are more interested in the how/why of your food, where it comes from, and the personal travails of those who grow it, you'll enjoy this one. There are a few select recipes included that call for the various types of peppers that are detailed in the book; you may or may not be able to find these easily but the recipes are well written and balanced in their ingredients and would tend to appeal to a wide range of people. It's not just a book that people who only enjoy hot spicy chilies would enjoy, the book details so many varieties that have wide appeal.
It seems that over the past few years, there have been a number of books that make us think about food, where it comes from, and how it impacts our health. I'm thinking of Michael Pollan's many top-selling titles, Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia, or Barbara Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life (P.S.)... the titles are numerous and I've been impressed with nearly all of the "food books" that I've read over the past few years (in fact it's become one of my genres of choice). Author's Kurt Friese, Kraig Kraft, and Gray Nabhan make their own offering to the field with their recent title Chasing Chiles: Hot Spots Along the Pepper Trail with a new take on the food book.

Rather than focusing solely on the experience of food or its origins, Chasing Chiles takes a broader glance at the infamous chile pepper and its future in a world challenged by "global weirding" (a more robust term referencing the weather patterns created by global warming used by the authors). The authors follow the story of six different types of chile peppers within their indigenous locations in North America. During each of their pepper "hunts" the roving gastronauts (as they refer to themselves) explore the chile-laced cuisine of each region while taking the time to learn the history behind each species of pepper as well as to glance into its future.

Friese, Kraft, and Nabhan perform spectacularly in weaving together a narrative that is entertaining and easy to follow while at the same time capturing the uncertainty and raw emotion brought on by impending climate change. They certainly put in the work to get their research visiting several farms just days after they have been ravage by new breeds of hurricanes and floods that visit much more frequently than they have in years gone by. What impressed me was their ability to wade through a variety of complex (and somewhat tedious subjects) in a way that was easy to understand. They truly framed the situation of each pepper and showing the linkages between each pepper and its home culture.

Chasing Chiles provides a new level of insight into how global climate change threatens to impact our food. Even if you remain skeptical about the human role in climate change, the authors provide a rather neutral assessment looking at the current state of chile production throughout the United States and letting the farmers feeling the brunt of the impact do the rest of the talking. As I mention earlier, the authors speak specifically of "global warming" explaining how shifting climate patterns (as opposed to just temperature increase) are changing how peppers are grown in North America and how the years ahead may hold some drastic shifts in not only cultivation techniques but also the geography of peppers.

Filled with a variety of knowledge on the horticulture and the evolution of chile peppers, Chasing Chiles makes a unique contribution to the food book genre. Each chapter ends with a handful of recipes that bring home the specific qualities of each of the peppers examined. Readers will enjoy following the authors in their journeys in the "Spice Ship" and will walk away with a much more nuanced knowledge of the incredible and diverse chile pepper.