» » Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle
Download Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle epub book
ISBN:0299200000
Author: Jad Adams
ISBN13: 978-0299200008
Title: Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle
Format: docx lit txt lrf
ePUB size: 1746 kb
FB2 size: 1997 kb
DJVU size: 1216 kb
Language: English
Category: Beverages and Wine
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (April 15, 2004)
Pages: 304

Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle by Jad Adams



255 21. Personal Name: Adams, Jad. Publication, Distribution, et. London On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

The information in this book is excellent, but the author is a little too focused on the more sordid rumors surrounding those who drank absinthe. The pacing of the book is choppy and at points reads more like a dissertation than a polished books. More visuals would also help, especially since so many of the people discussed are visual artists. That being said, however, it was a fun and informative book, perfect for someone looking to understand the influence of absinthe on the arts in the 19th century.

Jad Adams looks at the myths of absinthe and examines its influence on the artistic movements of the nineteenth century. He considers the work of Degas, Manet, and Picasso, who painted what are now considered masterpieces depicting absinthe drinkers

Mysteriously sophisticated, darkly alluring, almost Satanic: absinthe was the drink of choice for Baudelaire, Verlaine and Wilde. It inspired paintings by Degas and Manet, van Gogh and Picasso. It was blamed for conditions ranging from sterility to madness, to French defeats in World War I. The campaign against "the devil in a bottle" resulted in its ban throughout most of Europe. This book is a biography of "the green fairy": from its place in the lives of writers and artists who were inspired-and ruined-by it, to its more recent rediscovery by Ernest Hemingway and today’s would-be sophisticates. Introduction: The Devil Made Liquid. C’est le diable fait liquide Raoul Ponchon. new rooms of a London art dealer in a street leading to the flower market in Covent Garden, a sale is in progress.

Oscar Wilde, never much of an absintheur, described the effects of absinthe as occurring in three stages, the first stage an ordinary alcoholic effect, the second engendering ‘monstrous and cruel things’, and the third stage engendering ‘wonderful and curious things’ (p. 64). Adams describes the physical and psychological effects of absinthe well, and he demonstrates how it came to be emblematic of a decadent modernity in a number of paintings by Degas, Manet and Picasso.

Personally, I would describe this book as the 'history book of absinthe' rather than a connoisseur's guide to absinthe drinking like many of the others, or an ill-informed bias focusing too deeply on any particular period. Absinthe, a strongly alcoholic drink with a reputation of mythic proportions, is again in fashion, 90 years after it was banned in France and elsewhere as a cause of madness. The book ends with an acerbic examination of the recent revival of absinthe and its myths, thanks to clever publicity, an increased public tolerance of drug use, and the Internet.

Jad Adams is a television producer and author whose last book, Madder Music, Stronger Wine, received resounding critical praise. He has also written biographies of Tony Benn and of the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty. He lives in London and on the Greek island of Leros. What Our Readers Are Saying.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. National Bibliography Number: GBA3-X2679. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 1860649203. 64. 55 21. London.

Jad Adams, the British journalist behind this book, wanted to explore the curious hold that this beverage had on generations of artists and writers who were looking for inspiration. Finally, I caught this amusing little story about the intersection of fiction, marketing, and copywrites.

    Hideous Absinthe boldly combines the art, literature, science, and social history of the nineteenth century to produce the story of a drink that came to symbolize both the high points of art and the depths of degeneration.    Jad Adams looks at the myths of absinthe and examines its influence on the artistic movements of the nineteenth century. He considers the work of Degas, Manet, and Picasso, who painted what are now considered masterpieces depicting absinthe drinkers. He examines the mystery of van Gogh’s absinthe addiction and asks whether absinthe truly did contribute to the poetic vision of Verlaine, Rimbaud, and other writers.    Adams looks back at absinthe’s contribution to the hedonistic culture of the French Second Empire and to Toulouse-Lautrec’s Paris of the 1890s and details the outraged English reaction to absinthe in the context of resistance to French art. Absinthe was seen as a foreign poison undermining the national resolve just as the decadence of Oscar Wilde and his circle was seen to undermine national culture.    The story continues through thrill-seeking American and English absinthe drinkers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.Copublished with I.B. Tauris.The Wisconsin edition is for sale only in North America.

Reviews: 4
roternow
was given as gift and liked quite well
Sharpbrew
After hearing the author on npr I was eager to purchase and read this book. The book is well researched and it is overflowing with gossip about those artists with whom absinthe has been so intertwined--Proust, Gaugin, et al. The author contends that the drink had little or no real impact on the creative abilities of the writers and painters of the 19th century who claimed that the Green Fairy was their great muse. The argument falls flat, however. Whether the drink spurred the creativity or not is not as clear as the belief of the artists that it did have a very powerful and empowering influence. It is all very "chicken or the egg" speculation but in the end, this book is a fun read if you want a little dish on the life and times of these absinthe influenced artists.
Amerikan_Volga
The information in this book is excellent, but the author is a little too focused on the more sordid rumors surrounding those who drank absinthe. The pacing of the book is choppy and at points reads more like a dissertation than a polished books. More visuals would also help, especially since so many of the people discussed are visual artists. That being said, however, it was a fun and informative book, perfect for someone looking to understand the influence of absinthe on the arts in the 19th century.
ℳy★†ỦrÑ★ Wiℓℒ★₡oℳ€★TøØ
Different alcoholic drinks have reputations for appealing to different descriptions of people. The crowd of beer drinkers is different from those who favor cognac, as are those who like sherry different from those who drink single malts. There is no drink with so strong a reputation for a particular set of drinkers than absinthe. A cult drink in nineteenth century France, it has strong associations with poets and painters; the claims made for it have been extravagantly laudatory and condemnatory. It figures largely in literature and paintings of that time and place, which has only increased its reputation, good and bad. And it is still under prohibition in many countries, including the United States, which makes it forbidden fruit. Thus there is a good story, lots of good stories, to tell in _Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle_ (University of Wisconsin Press) by Jad Adams. It isn't too surprising that a main lesson of the book is that extravagant claims, positive and negative, for "the green fairy" are simply exaggerations.
Absinthe is a high-proof alcohol drink to which has been added essential oils of wormwood, plus aniseed or fennel, which taste like liquorice and gave the famous clear green color. It became particularly a drink for French Bohemian writers and artists. Adams shows, however, that the poets and painters who concentrated on absinthe as a subject were minor artists busy cultivating a bohemian atmosphere around themselves; the greater artists might have included it as part of their world, but had no particular fascination for it. Wormwood has a chemical called thujone within it, which might be a mild hallucinogen, but there is question that it would have had any significant effect at the dose provided in absinthe. What certainly would have had effect is the high amount of alcohol in the drink. Absinthe's widespread adoption scared the French government, which listened to the experts blaming it for everything from anarchy to population decline to the rise of Jews. A national ban was eventually enforced in 1915. In England, absinthe never had much of a hold, as it was seen as representing everything corrupt about France. In the US, those who provided alcohol during prohibition had little interest in this particular aperitif, and when prohibition was lifted, absinthe remained on the list of banned drugs. It was still available to American expatriates in different countries in Europe, and when the Cold War ended, tourism to such places as Prague brought a new boom in absinthe-drinking.
Except that there was little to match the extravagant reports of a century before. Absinthe became trendy with some rock stars (one ad campaign said, "Tonight we're gonna party like it's 1899"), and it isn't surprising that their experiences of it did not meet those of the introverted Parisian artists that had gone before. Part of the problem is that they are not drinking the same thing. Absinthe from eastern Europe did not smell of aniseed, did not have oils so that it did not turn cloudy during the preparation ceremony, and did not have nearly enough wormwood to cause mental effects above those from the alcohol. Any chemical artistic inspiration just wasn't there. In a fascinating work of history with short biographies of famous drinkers of the time, Adams shows that the problem wasn't chemical. Absinthe met the expectations of a particular crowd of artists who gave it a particular reputation at a particular time. Even if the absintheur rock band Sugar Cubes (lead by the famous Björk) had the absinthe that Van Gogh drank, it would be a bit much to expect equivalent masterpieces.