» » HTML Programmer's Reference
Download HTML Programmer's Reference epub book
ISBN:0078825598
Author: Dan Whitworth,Thomas A. Powell
ISBN13: 978-0078825590
Title: HTML Programmer's Reference
Format: lrf lrf mobi txt
ePUB size: 1950 kb
FB2 size: 1196 kb
DJVU size: 1954 kb
Language: English
Category: Web Development and Design
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; 1 edition (May 26, 1998)
Pages: 396

HTML Programmer's Reference by Dan Whitworth,Thomas A. Powell



On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book HTML : programmer's reference, Thomas A. Powell and Dan Whitworth.

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Download book HTML programmer's reference, Thomas A.

HTML Programmer's Reference includes expert advice on the use of attributes. He developed the Web Design Certificate Program at UCSD, teaches web publishing classes and serves as senior instructor and faculty advisor in the University's Information Technology Program. He holds a Bachelor of Science from UCLA and a Master's degree in Computer Science from UCSD.

Powell begins the book with introductory chapters that discuss HTML and Web background and set the limits of what HTML coding alone can accomplish. From there he moves into lessons in basic HTML and progresses chapter by chapter to such high-end topics as advanced layout techniques, how to standardize Web-page presentation among browsers with style sheets, programmed Web pages, and client-side scripting and programming. The six appendices finish the book with a wealth of easy-to-use quick-reference information. Categories: Computers\Web-design.

information at your fingertips! HTML Programmer's Reference includes expert advice on the use of attributes, elements, and syntax and covers HTML . 1 upgrades and XHTML .

HTML Programmer's Reference book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking HTML Programmer's Reference as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This title compliments the HTML: The Complete Reference also written by Thomas Powell. This book is, just as it claims, the most authoritative quick reference for HTML programmers. They give you browser compatibility information for each tag as well as all of the browser-specific attributes and event support. The book is finished out with an indispensable special character and color reference - giving all information about it as possible as well as browser compatibility.

by Thomas A. Powell, Dan Whitworth. This title compliments the HTML: The Complete Reference also written by Thomas Powell. A comprehensive resource for all versions of HTML elements including tables, frames, forms, and image maps that continue to be supported by the browsers and the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium). The focus is placed on listing elements, keywords, and other reference material, and fewer pages are devoted to instructing readers on how to use HTML).

You'll also find examples and definitions of the latest Navigator, Internet Explorer, and WebTV tags at your fingertips - plus expert advice on which commands to use and when to use them. This vital memory jogger and "idea book" is perfect for beginning through advanced HTML programmers! Use it and you will: Jump to concise definitions of essential HTML syntax, elements, and attributes.

Title: HTML Programmer's Reference. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media. Publishing date: January 2001.

This title compliments the HTML: The Complete Reference also written by Thomas Powell. A comprehensive resource for all versions of HTML elements including tables, frames, forms, and image maps that continue to be supported by the browsers and the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium). The focus is placed on listing elements, keywords, and other reference material, and fewer pages are devoted to instructing readers on how to use HTML). Programmers can use this reference as an ""idea book, "" thumbing through content finding commands or functions that may provide alternative solutions. The authors deliver a powerful and concise reference handbook for novice and experienced programmers alike--provides at-your fingertips access to clear explanations of HTML elements, syntax, keywords, commands, and functions.
Reviews: 7
Virtual
It's been about 3 years since I wrote my original review of the book HTML Programmer's Reference, 1st Ed. [see post November 19, 1999]. Since that period, I've developed and deployed several web sites all from having obtained the basic knowledge and practical application of the syntax and tag constructs from this modest book. The direction of HTML development is moving forward with the wide usage of XHTML. And, again the authors show insight into the industry trend by updating this REFERENCE book with the latest version of XHTML 1.0.
If I must say something negative [seeing that the publishers market this book as an "idea book"], the examples shown are a bit basic. For example, the "target" attribute within the "<a " Anchor tag explains the various formats but does not clearly show its usage when rendering a page within a browser's frames, which is a common usage of this feature.
I use this book when I have forgotten the exact construct of certain tags, or when the pages are rendered in several browser products [like IE or Netscape]. If your beginning to think about designing web pages, this is only one of several books you'll own. There are plenty of "how-to" books that cover the syntax and tag construction in a more reader-centric format. I must state that this is a reference book and is probably not intended to begin your exposure to web development services [only the authors will disagree]. However, this book is truly a gem and worth every cent of the price, and like fine wine, will hold its value well into the future.
Giamah
I wanted an HTML handbook, not a textbook, something to give me the format and options for each command. This is it.
The organization couldn't be clearer: the bulk of the book is the complete list of HTML directives, in alphabetical order. It also includes indices of names for special characters and colors. There's a lot of compatibility information, too, regarding both HTML versions and browser incompatibilities.
The "Examples" section is weak, and seems to assume a knowledge of SGML beyond what HTML really requires. It's also vague about specifics of style directives, and the relationship of HTML to CSS or embedded scripts. Other books fill those gaps, though. This book works as just one in a more complete library for web-page writers, and that's just fine.
There are better books to learn from, but this is the best I've seen for supporting experienced HTML users.
Shou
This is a really useful book. It may look a little technical at first with the 10-20 line syntax summary beginning each entry, but don't be put off!
The entry for each element (TD, P, BODY, FRAME, etc.) explains the applicable attributes (size, type, width, etc.) and the applicable values ("80%", "red", "text/css") for each attribute. It tells you which browser supports what, what is legal, what is discouraged but expedient ;-).
There are tables of colors (names, hex values, rgb decimal values), character entities (always telling you which work with which browsers).
Each entry explains the use of the element and its related attributes and values.
Appendix A is an excellent 20 page discussion of URLs.
Appendix B is 2 pages of carefully selected web resources.
This is not at all a Begin To Learn HTML book. But to check syntax or to see what exactly you can put in a <TABLE> tag, it's just great. It is an excellent supplement to something more in the tutorial line.
Unfortunately, the subject is strictly HTML, so no information on Cascading Style Sheets is included.
Oh, there is a 10 page summary of events (onclick, etc) and which elements (& browsers) support them for the dynamic HTML crowd.
This book references browsers only by their main version number (i.e., Navigator 4, not 4.5 versus 4.01) and it predates Internet Explorer 5.
I prefer this book, as a reference, to the O'Reilly HTML book or their DHTML book and to the big fat HTML The Complete Reference (same author & publisher). The last one, I think, in fact contains the book I am reviewing as its appendix A, but it is so heavy and cumbersome it stays on the bookcase in favor of this smaller one.
Jia
Chapter 1 starts out with the rules of HTML (20 pages). Chapter 2, a comprehensive list of the HTML tags, their attributes, and a small spattering of sample usage, is the bulk of the book (and the part I use the most often). The tags are listed alphabetically and help you resolve most HTML syntax issues. Each attribute has a brief description so you know what they do. Chapter 3 is a fairly good list of all the special characters available (about 30 pages worth). Chapter 4 is a thin coverage of color. Chapter 5 (which was too technical for me to read until just a couple weeks ago) covers the HTML DTD. The two small appendices are small and not that useful (except for the small list of character encodings, I hardly use them at all).
I love this HTML reference, one of the best purchases I've made!
Amhirishes
This book is, just as it claims, the most authoritative quick reference for HTML programmers. This is an excellent book!
The authors list each HTML tag in alphabetical order and give each legal attribute and actually explains what each one is and does. They give you browser compatibility information for each tag as well as all of the browser-specific attributes and event support.
The book is finished out with an indispensable special character and color reference - giving all information about it as possible as well as browser compatibility.
This book is wonderful! Excellent! Indispensable! And anyone who would say otherwise is as ignorant as they come.