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Download Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction epub book
ISBN:0262041960
Author: Paul Dourish
ISBN13: 978-0262041966
Title: Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction
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ePUB size: 1672 kb
FB2 size: 1553 kb
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Language: English
Category: Computer Science
Publisher: The MIT Press; 1st edition (October 1, 2001)
Pages: 256

Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction by Paul Dourish



PDF On Oct 1, 2001, Paul Dourish and others published Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction. entire book: What is radical is the relationship it proposes between technical design and social understandings. The first is in better understanding. human interpretation, in particular the way that people’s interaction with systems is a fundamentally embodied. The second use of embodied interaction is as a critical stance to take in discussing the design of. existing technologies. In a way that echoes the theoretical imbalance mentioned in the previous two paragraphs, the.

A Bradford Book The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher. This book was set in Sabon by Interactive Composition Corporation. Printed and bound in the United States of America.

Paul Dourish MIT Press, December 2001, ISBN 0-262-04196-0. Most textbooks in HCI and CSCW do not offer a coherent and over–arching understanding of social and technological issues. Where the Action Is is the best book in HCI for years, and everyone who reads this journal should read it. I hope it sells in truckloads.

Teo said: A bit too heavy on jargon and light on substance. In this book, Paul Dourish addresses the philosophical bases of human-computer interaction. He looks at how what he calls "embodied interaction"-an a Computer science as an engineering discipline has been spectacularly successful. Yet it is also a philosophical enterprise in the way it represents the world and creates and manipulates models of reality, people, and action. Dourish presents a model for a new approach to the science of interaction, that he calls Embodied Interaction. The most interesting is the different perspectives brought, mainly the phenomenological ones, to design the framework. The problem, and that's why the book became so difficult to read, is that Dourish tried to work a model that would serve any kind of interaction.

Where the Action Is is a book by Paul Dourish slated for publication by MIT Press in October 2001. It's topic is "embodied interaction", a novel approach to the design of user interfaces and our interactive experience of computation. The idea of Embodied Interaction reflects a number of recent trends that have emerged in the area of Human-Computer Interaction.

Where the Action Is provides intellectual foundations for the emerging movement that makes people, and not machines, central to the process of design. With a clarity and thoughtfulness that make hard ideas easy, Paul Dourish's book will only increase in importance as the social nature of computing becomes evident to a new generation of technologists. Philip E. Agre, Department of Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles (Endorsement). Paul Dourish has now done them for me. All my future publications will have to show consistency with this book, show they are clearly outside the area covered by this book, or show the book is wrong. The last alternative is most unlikely. I think I can show my work, based on Darwinism and ontology, complies with the first option.

Paul Dourish is Chancellor's Professor of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction and coauthor of Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing, both published by the MIT Press. Human-computer interaction meets philosophical treatments of embodiment. The result: a foundational study of living and acting in a wired world. And a rare achievement too: a readable and engaging book which manages to be both sensible and groundbreaking at the same time. Department of Philosophy, University of Edinburgh. A revolution in design and the role of computer science is upon us: Where the Action Is describes the way.

Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction (Bradford Books). Download (pdf, . 6 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

In this book, Paul Dourish addresses the philosophical bases of human-computer interaction.

Computer science as an engineering discipline has been spectacularly successful. Yet it is also a philosophical enterprise in the way it represents the world and creates and manipulates models of reality, people, and action. In this book, Paul Dourish addresses the philosophical bases of human-computer interaction. He looks at how what he calls "embodied interaction"—an approach to interacting with software systems that emphasizes skilled, engaged practice rather than disembodied rationality—reflects the phenomenological approaches of Martin Heidegger, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and other twentieth-century philosophers. The phenomenological tradition emphasizes the primacy of natural practice over abstract cognition in everyday activity. Dourish shows how this perspective can shed light on the foundational underpinnings of current research on embodied interaction. He looks in particular at how tangible and social approaches to interaction are related, how they can be used to analyze and understand embodied interaction, and how they could affect the design of future interactive systems.
Reviews: 5
Iarim
This work figures to be front-and-center in my dissertation as a sociologist.

If you're straddling the line between sociology and technology, or between philosophy and technology, this is a fabulous work to own and digest.

Does a great job of elaborating both Garfinkel's ethnomethodological perspective with a particular eye toward its sociotechnological implications, and of marrying this exposition to an account of some of the most important works in phenomenology and 19th/20th century phenomenology.

For anyone that doesn't take technology seriously as an inherently social phenomenon, this work will be an eye-opener. For those that are hardcore social/cultural scholars, this book will help to bridge the analytical and theoretical gap for works and projects that have to confront the technological nature of the contemporary social epoch, as heavily technologically mediated as it is.

Marry to Mumford's Technics and Civilization for a broad, deep confrontation with the sociotechnical present.
Jwalextell
One of the strong sides of this book is that it makes it really easy for the reader - things are generally summarized and repeated exactly in the right places. It can serve as an introduction to the world of phenomenology, sociology and philosophy as pertaining to Human-Computer Interfaces.
It felt more like a mixture between a proposal and an introductory philosophical treatise than an overview of the current state of the field (it carries the word "foundations" in its title for a reason).
After reading it however, I still wasn't convinced that "social computing", "tangible computing" and "embodied interaction" really add up to a construct that can effectively inform the design of new HCI devices even though this claim was repeated throughout the book almost like a prayer wheel.
Interestingly, while the book points out the meaning of embodiment in already existing work practices, it fails to give any strategies on how these theories can actually be applied to the design of effective new HCI devices that go beyond the shiny toys produced at MIT Media Lab.
The loophole seems to be that embodied practices can only arise once the tools are defined, so that it is hard to predict what practices will be used once it's out there - since the way we use tools is largely improvisatory, as Dourish points out.
I also can not stop to wonder if the term "embodiment" is akin to "multimedia" - a belief system that can mean so many things that it effectively disintegrates sooner or later.

So, while it left me not exactly sure that there really is another end to it, it was certainly worthwhile and inspiring to work through this book in a thorough manner - I now feel courageous enough to put my nose into "Being and Time" by Heidegger.
A friendly way to get your brain going!
Ariurin
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Iraraeal
This is a major work on the redesign of the human/computer interface. It is well written but very deep. Excellent academic research is clearly demonstrate throughout. I would not say, however, that it is an easy read.
Engineering research does not generally have to be as strongly academically founded as scientific research. The controlling factor is "does it work," not how does it relate to previous work. This tendency leads to problems when it is necessary to do multidisciplinary work involving both engineering and science. The redesign of the human/computer interface is just such a problem.
As an engineer working independently in this field, I have often wished for the time and resources to do proper academic studies. Paul Dourish has now done them for me. All my future publications will have to show consistency with this book, show they are clearly outside the area covered by this book, or show the book is wrong. The last alternative is most unlikely. I think I can show my work, based on Darwinism and ontology, complies with the first option. I am certain that my work will be stronger for this effort.
Charyoll
A very interesting, and yet clear to read and follow book. "Where the action is" was a reading reference for my qualifier exam and after reading it I was hooked up to HCI forever. Very exciting and a "must read" for all HCI researchers.