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Download Sharing the Journey: Active Reflections on the Church's Presence With Mentally Retarded Persons epub book
ISBN:0697022080
Author: Ellen Cook
ISBN13: 978-0697022080
Title: Sharing the Journey: Active Reflections on the Church's Presence With Mentally Retarded Persons
Format: rtf docx lit lrf
ePUB size: 1763 kb
FB2 size: 1562 kb
DJVU size: 1929 kb
Language: English
Category: Ministry and Evangelism
Publisher: William C Brown Pub (April 1, 1987)
Pages: 132

Sharing the Journey: Active Reflections on the Church's Presence With Mentally Retarded Persons by Ellen Cook



Active Reflections on the Church's Presence With Mentally Retarded Persons. Published April 1987 by William C Brown Pub.

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by Ellen Cook; National Apostolate with Mentally Retarded Persons (. Publisher: Dubuque, Iowa : Religious Education Division, . Public Lists that Include "Sharing the journey : active reflections on the Church's presence with mentally retarded persons". First Prev 1 Next Last.

Sharing the Journey: Active Reflections on the Church's Presence With Mentally Retarded Persons. 978-O-697-O22O8-O (O-697-O22O8-O). E C. · Eileen Casey · Eileen Cook · Eileen Cox · Elaine Chaika · Elaine Chase · Elaine Cook · Elaine Cox · Elena Cassia · Elena Coccia · Elena Coco · Elena Cossu · Elina Cuaz · Ellen Caughey · Ellen Chase · Ellen Cook Nibali · Ellen Piel Cook · Elwyn Cox. Ellen Cook Nibali.

between the environment and mentally retarded persons. Material and Methods. Mastering the capacity to function in society is one of the major conditions that enable active life leading to a more complete feedback-based community integration that stimulates their further development. Among the consequences of mental retardation one should also mention the difficulties to achieve social adaptation understood as an adjustment to social life requirements and social maturity, taking and acting out various social roles reliably. Moreover, in comparison with other groups of disabled people they more seldom gain understanding and acceptance.

Woven into the narrative layers are also the author's reflections on this interview and those conducted with six other mothers of children with disabilities and/or chronic impairments. This book offers for professionals and families. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

In no event should a retarded individual be retained at any facility solely because his of her presence enables the institution to maintain itself. The right to be part of a family. A retarded individual should not be summarily excised from his family, and should be permitted and encouraged to be with them whenever his developmental needs can be met satisfactorily in this manner.

Whenever mentally retarded persons are unable, because of the severity of their handicap, to exercise all their rights in a meaningful way or it should become necessary to restrict or deny some or all of these rights, the procedure used for that restriction or denial of rights must contain proper legal safeguards against every form of abuse.

With mentally retarded infants, the treatment emphasis is on sensorimotor development, which can be stimulated by exercises and special types of play. Current social and health care policies encourage keeping mentally retarded persons in their own homes or in informal group home settings rather than institutions. Beirne-Smith, Mary, et a. eds.

Usually, when a child is mentally retarded, the family’s complete focus is on the child and how to help him/her to the best possible extent. However, as caregivers to this child, the family members(the parents, siblings, grandparents or other relatives) go through a significant amount of stress and anguish themselves in the process of raising such a child. Hrithik’s parents are a typical example of such a family. 6. Unrealistic expectations – Many times, parents of mentally retarded children are dissatisfied with the slow progress their child is making in learning new things. They push harder to force the child to learn quicker and try to be on par with other children. However, the child can only learn to the best of his/her ability and no more.