» » Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins
Download Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins epub book
ISBN:0687010020
Author: Harold J. Recinos
ISBN13: 978-0687010028
Title: Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins
Format: docx doc lrf mobi
ePUB size: 1917 kb
FB2 size: 1802 kb
DJVU size: 1337 kb
Language: English
Category: Churches and Church Leadership
Publisher: Abingdon Press (November 1, 1997)
Pages: 160

Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins by Harold J. Recinos



Once again, Harold Recinos opens up the gospel for us from the perspective of the barrio, and in particular of those recent immigrants who have arrived at the barrio as refugees from situations of unspeakable violence and dehumanization. This is a hard-hitting book about a hard-hitting Jesus. Not recommended for those who are looking for a soft, other-worldly word of inspiration. But certainly required reading for any who wish to be faithful to Jesus in our contemporary society!" - -Justo L. GonzAlez.

Jesus at the Margins. Author : Harold J. Recinos. Publisher : Abingdon Press. Users who liked this book, also liked. Dancing with Dinosaurs: Ministry in a Hostile & Hurting World (English).

Who Comes in the Name of the Lord? Jesus at the Margins (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997). Jesus Weeps: Global Encounters on our Doorstep (Nashville: Abingdon, 1992). Professional Distinctions.

Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins. Good News from the Barrio: Prophetic Witness for the Church. List View. Grid View. Books by Harold J. Voices on the Corner. by Harold J. Publisher: Wipf & Stock Publishers.

Personal Name: Recinos, Harold J. (Harold Joseph), 1955-. Personal Name: Magallanes, Hugo. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?: Jesus at the Margins - Nov 1, 1997 by Harold J. Popol Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Ancient Quiche Maya - Sep 1991 by Adrian Recinos and Aylvanus G. Morley. Experiences: Experiencias - Sep 3, 2011 by Juan Carlos Recinos. Hear the Cry: A Latino Pastor Challenges the Church - Apr 1989 by Harold J. Browse by initial letter.

In Who Comes in the Name of the Lord?, Harold J. Recinos advances the thesis that God has already prepared a future for mainline churches in Christ at the margins of society. That margin is the barrio -- a contemporary Nazareth -- judged by society as inferior, worthless, and productive of nothing good.

Drawing on the biblical witness, Recinos develops a perspective that shows that God identifies with those who are poor, marginal, weak, and lowly in society. God's option for the lowly, he asserts, takes the form of incarnation in Jesus of Nazareth. God-in-Jesus is enfleshed in the history of an unimportant place known as Nazareth of Galilee. Nazareth, an inferior and worthless place, supports God on its barrio streets. Far from the Temple, on the town roads and with fisher-folk, Jesus first reveals in a fresh way the God of the poor and lowly.

The cultural role of mainline Christians, argues Recinos, is not to be guardians of society; rather, mainline Christians and their churches are to shape and amend their culture in response to the work of God in human history. That work is imaged by feasting with the uninvited people who are kept isolated from mainstream society, yet presuppose the reality of God. Thus, Recinos argues for a missional ecclesiology suggesting that local congregations are instruments of a sacred love that renews the world of uninvited guests and forgotten people. The true church, he says, does not meet the anguished cry of people at the margins of life with silence but with dikaioma ("a just action") which assures shalom. The author then suggests several ways the local church can announce the reign of God and peace with justice, beginning in the barrio.

"Once again, Harold Recinos opens up the gospel for us from the perspective of the barrio, and in particular of those recent immigrants who have arrived at the barrio as refugees from situations of unspeakable violence and dehumanization. This is a hard-hitting book about a hard-hitting Jesus. Not recommended for those who are looking for a soft, other-worldly word of inspiration. But certainly required reading for any who wish to be faithful to Jesus in our contemporary society!" --Justo L. González