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ISBN:0822384299
Author: Pamela Voekel
ISBN13: 978-0822384298
Title: Alone Before God: The Religious Origins of Modernity in Mexico
Format: azw mbr lrf doc
ePUB size: 1856 kb
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Category: Catholicism
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Pages: 345

Alone Before God: The Religious Origins of Modernity in Mexico by Pamela Voekel



Voekel, Pamela, 1963-. Publication, Distribution, et. Durham On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Alone before God : the religious origins of modernity in Mexico, Pamela Voekel.

Alone Before God: The Re. .has been added to your Cart. Voekel's engaging history of the debates surrounding burials and cemetaries in late colonial Mexico provides a fresh perspective on the origins of nationalist sentiments in Latin America. Her creative reading of wills and other archival materals will inspire historians and anthropologists to think in new ways about the role of religion in early liberal thought.

Alone Before God book.

Focusing on cemetery burials in ury Mexico, "Alone Before God" provides a window onto the contested origins of modernity in Mexico.

Alone Before God. The Religious Origins of Modernity in Mexico. Book Pages: 344 Illustrations: Published: August 2002. Author: Pamela Voekel. Subjects History Latin American History, Latin American Studies Mexico, Religious Studies. Focusing on cemetery burials in ury Mexico, Alone Before God provides a window onto the contested origins of modernity in Mexico. Her creative reading of wills and other archival materals will inspire historians and anthropologists to think in new was about the role of religion in early liberal thought.

Alone before God: The Religious Origins of Modernity in Mexico. Juanita Garciagodoy, "Alone before God: The Religious Origins of Modernity in Mexico. Pamela Voekel," The Journal of Religion 83, no. 3 (Ju. 2003): 499-501. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Some Characteristics of Hinduism as a Religion. The Ethical Theory of Saint Thomas Aquinas: Interpretations and Misinterpretations. How Old Was Solomon When He Began to Reign?

Durham: Duke University Press, 2002. This book adds a new level of sophistication to our understanding of the complex impact of Enlightenment ideas in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Mexico. In ways both subtle and blunt, reformers sought to transform ideas into action. Wills, burial records, sermons, laws, official correspondence, and other sources shed light on the sociopolitics of death; they offer a window onto that process and reactions to it.

Related books and articles. FREE! modernism The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th e. 2018. Questia is operated by Cengage Learning.

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Focusing on cemetery burials in ury Mexico, Alone Before God provides a window onto the contested origins of modernity in Mexico. By investigating the religious and political debates surrounding the initiative to transfer the burials of prominent citizens from urban to suburban cemeteries, Pamela Voekel challenges the characterization of Catholicism in Mexico as an intractable and monolithic institution that had to be forcibly dragged into the modern world

Reviews: 2
HyderCraft
For certain historians, the intensive study of nineteenth and twentieth century topics would appear to mask a subconscious hostility to its reality-- and a cloying desire that it be different from what it was. An inclination rather like this would appear to have animated this curious work on the history of the Roman Catholic Church’s relations with elites and masses in Mexico. The author posits the existence in the 1800s of an unexpectedly “liberal” Catholicism that promoted an inclusive, warm-handed relation with Mexicans high and low. This bizarre assertion challenges, but never comes close to overthrowing, the standard depiction of the Church, which holds that the Mexican clergy defended a bastion of reaction unequalled even by Rome itself. To argue otherwise would seem to offer a novel contribution to the topic, and it’s thus unfortunate that the author fails to make her case. Sadly, it’s not difficult to see why. Whenever the empirical evidence cannot be twisted into supporting her broader thesis, Voekel takes refuge in the many culs-de-sac of “postcolonial” jargon, an approach that will perhaps dazzle some readers but will confuse everyone else. In the end, her effort to project the reforming zeal of Vatican II back into the early 1800s, and to find a sweet-soulfulness among ultramontane Mexican Catholics looks like wishful thinking. And it is more than simply far-fetched: it is sad. It strips from adamantine reactionaries all the hardness that they strove so hard to construct in themselves, and seeks to replace their ardor with an unconvincing moderation. The Mexican Catholics of the nineteenth century would never recognize themselves in such a depiction, and no amount of doublespeak --and de-contextualized archival citations-- can turn their character from obsidian black to powder-puff blue.
Manris
Voekel uses crisp prose and clever nuance to craft a much needed book on piety and modernity in Bourbon Mexico. The importance of the Bourbon era is underdeveloped or misunderstood in strictly economic terms by current authors, and Voekel shatters that type. The author takes a mundane item like burial reform and creates a sharp, well documented and clear argument about piety, reform, modernity and power. Five well-deserved stars to Voekel for this work