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ISBN:0310492173
Author: John C. Lennox
ISBN13: 978-0310492177
Title: Seven Days That Divide the World: The Beginning According to Genesis and Science
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ePUB size: 1850 kb
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Language: English
Category: Bible Study and Reference
Publisher: Zondervan; 37571st edition (August 27, 2011)
Pages: 192

Seven Days That Divide the World: The Beginning According to Genesis and Science by John C. Lennox



Categories: Theology. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. File: EPUB, . 8 MB. 2. Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology Volume 2: Providence, Scripture, and Resurrection.

About book: Dr. John Lennox is such a nice fellow. Reading his book I am convinced once more that interaction between people with different ideas on a given subject can be based on respect. This is a thing I can hardly see on the www between christians and atheists. John Lennox says that this is very important because there was a lot of opposition in science agains what currently is the standard model, given it supports a christian worldview. John Lennox is among the world's leading apologists, in my view, because he combines several admirable qualities: he is a bona fide expert on a relevant discipline (although mathematics is about as far away from most of the things he talks about as an apologist as one would want to be, since math at his level is as much art form as.

The author (John Lennox) did such a good job presenting multiple ideas and theories for various interpretations of Genesis. This book does not argue reasons for or against believing in evolution, but more talks about what the bible tells us and combines it with that we now know from science. This book is full of great insights into how to understand Genesis 1 from a scientific perspective.

Keywords: Lennox, young earth, old earth, Galileo, church fathers, days of creation, Creation Week, fourth day, death and suffering, age of the earth. John Lennox is a professor of mathematics and a fellow in the philosophy of science at Oxford University. He is a devoted follower of Christ and a skilful apologist. In his book Seven Days That Divide the World, Lennox explores the potential minefield of the controversy of Genesis and science. He wrote the book for people who have been put off considering the Christian faith because of the .

The beginning according to. Genesis and science. For Larry Taunton, whose idea it was. This book is a delight to read: It is thoughtful, perceptive, friendly, and bold when it needs to be. Dr. Lennox has gone right to the heart of the matter in his thinking about Genesis and the age of the earth, and how that is a different question from purposeless evolution. Lennox has written a wise, well-informed work, and it deserves the widest readership possible. Paul Copan, Professor and Pledger Family Chair. of Philosophy and Ethics, Palm Beach Atlantic. University, West Palm Beach, Florida.

Professor Lennox once encountered a brilliant professor from a eastern country who had been completely put off Christianity because she was taught, . hat the Bible starts with a very silly, unscientific story of how the world was made in seven days. his book is written for people like her, who have been putting off even considering the Christian faith for this kind of reason. The first chapter is, to this writer, amazingly brilliant. I would have never thought to compare these two ideas and when Prof.

What did the writer of Genesis mean by the first day ? Is it a literal week or a series of time periods? If I believe that the earth is . billion years old, am I denying the authority of Scripture? In response to the continuing controversy over the interpretation of the creation narrative in Genesis, John Lennox proposes a succinct method of reading and interpreting the first chapters of Genesis without discounting either science or Scripture.

Unabridged Audiobook. In response to the continuing controversy over the interpretation of the creation narrative in Genesis, John Lennox proposes a succinct method of reading and interpreting the first chapters of Genesis without discounting either science or Scripture.

Created gods certainly are a delusion. John C. Lennox, Seven Days That Divide the World: The Beginning According to Genesis and Science. Here we have the basic ingredients that define human beings as moral beings. God has given them the ability to say yes to him by not eating the prohibited tree, and to say no to him by eating it. In this way the Bible introduces us to the idea that the humans are moral beings, with all that this implies.

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What did the writer of Genesis mean by “the first day”? Is it a literal week or a series of time periods? If I believe that the earth is 4.5 billion years old, am I denying the authority of Scripture?In response to the continuing controversy over the interpretation of the creation narrative in Genesis, John Lennox proposes a succinct method of reading and interpreting the first chapters of Genesis without discounting either science or Scripture. With examples from history, a brief but thorough exploration of the major interpretations, and a look into the particular significance of the creation of human beings, Lennox suggests that Christians can heed modern scientific knowledge while staying faithful to the biblical narrative. He moves beyond a simple response to the controversy, insisting that Genesis teaches us far more about the God of Jesus Christ and about God’s intention for creation than it does about the age of the earth. With this book, Lennox offers a careful yet accessible introduction to a scientifically-savvy, theologically-astute, and Scripturally faithful interpretation of Genesis.
Reviews: 7
Modigas
The author (John Lennox) did such a good job presenting multiple ideas and theories for various interpretations of Genesis. This book does not argue reasons for or against believing in evolution, but more talks about what the bible tells us and combines it with that we now know from science. He gently starts the book out reminding readers of a time when Christians were determined to prove that the sun moved around a fixed earth because of references in the bible that seemed to suggest that. He believes the bible is the infallible word of God, but that our interpretations of it don't hold that same weight. He encourages readers in what my favorite Christian preacher Alistar Begg says that "The main things are the Plain things, and the Plain things are the main things" I am humbled and feel my mind has opened a bit to the warning not to take popular opinion, or tradition as excuses for not trying to interpret the truth.

There are some things the Bible is pretty obvious and clear on. "In the Beginning GOD"... did it. He's the Creator and He did it in a phased approach. How long those phases were, be it 24 literal hours, 24 hours with long breaks in between acts of new levels of creation complexity, or long ages of creation between each Genesis tier, is highly debatable. The author provides reasons for thinking each of these and does so fairly and humbly.

The other area Lennox draws a line on is that humans are made in the image of God. That we are special and unique. He goes on to discuss why this makes sense even if you believe in an old earth with evolutionary periods mixed with super natural events. There are things in here and parts of his theology I'm not sure I agree with (Satan corrupting the earth before Human's sinned), but then, they aren't the main things and certainly not worth missing out on the main message and subject of this book and I don't claim to have studied enough to earn an opinion. Lennox continually points readers back to what Genesis says about who God is and why we are here, and removes the barrier of choosing between atheism evolution or young-earth creationist as the debate has recently been reduced to. There is some rational, scientifically savvy middle ground.

All this to say, I only made it to (not through) 300-level college sciences. I got as high in math as I could until it started going all abstract art-language on me. I'm not a genius and I don't consider myself scientifically well-read. I enjoyed reading a brilliant Christian mathematician argue that reason, science and God can share the same space and not deteriorate the authority of scripture. I've long been doubtful of a literal 24 hour interpretation of Genesis as I wonder when the angel rebellion happened? They are creatures/created... when were they cast out? I also even more simply wonder how Adam could name all the animals and get lonely in a single day. My personal feelings on it all is that I am comfortable not knowing how God pulled it off. I believe he made it all, and he did it on purpose, and that each person bears elements of God's image. This book reminded me of two things. First, to be humble and know what I don't know, and secondly, try to be open-minded in my interpretation of scripture and not draw false lines in the sand... Like the earth is fixed, or it has to be young.

Ultimately I've walked away with the thought that Natural Science can help interpret the Bible, when you believe God to be the author of both.
Whitegrove
I read this book as part of my research for the "One Verse Podcast."

It's hard to disagree with a man who has 3 Doctorates.

And I don't disagree ... not exactly. This book is full of great insights into how to understand Genesis 1 from a scientific perspective.

It is just that this book is little more than a basic introduction to some of the issues and themes surrounding Genesis 1, and even then, some of the points made the book seem to be poorly researched and explained.

For example, on page 125, he quoted K. A. Kitchen as saying that while there are numerous analogies between Genesis 1-2 and the Babylonian Enuma Elish, there is not direct relationship between the two, and so we must abandon any attempt to see any connection or correlation.

In my own research, I have found exactly the opposite, and a large number of contemporary Bible scholars are seeing more and more correlation and connection between Genesis 1-2 and the Enuma Elish, and not only that, but also with the Egyptian and Canaanite creation stories as well.

I do think, however, that his explanation of the word "yom" (day) is spot on (pp. 49-52), as well as his explanation of the so-called "creation" of the sun, moon, and stars on the fourth day (pp. 58-60). His explanations are short, but accurate.

Ultimately, this book, while good, is little more than an introduction to some of the key themes and issues surrounding the interpretation and understanding of Genesis 1 in light of modern science.
Yahm
Lennox begins his textual analysis of the first two books of genesis by discussing the "fixed earth" controversy in the Fifteenth century. Theologians like Martin Luther and John Calvin rejected the best explanations of science in their day based on a logical reading of many verses in The Bible. Today even fundamentalist organizations like Answers in Genesis accept a heliocentric paradigm for the Solar System. Lennox' purpose is to show that interpreting The Bible "literally" means more than often is assumed at first glance. Believing Bible scholars have allowed a scientific understanding of reality to transform their literal interpretation of The Bible. Lennox sets out, therefore, to show that a literal interpretation of The Bible is a complicated task, and one that does not need to oppose mainstream science, and cannot conclude in a 6 literal day interpretation of the epochs of creation. This is helpful in combating fundamentalism and helping devout Christians trust the scientific enterprise. Lennox is still confused about evolution, however. He accepts an old earth and an old universe, and demonstrates that a faithful reading of The Bible gave pre-Darwin and pre-Lyel scholars room to accept deep time before science made such an interpretation necessary. He admits the creation of human beings, however, as a special creation of God, not explainable through natural processes. He does not tell us where that leaves pre-human hominids, however. He has a very good section on The God of the Gaps dilemma, defining the issue and encouraging Christians to avoid it. He falls victim to God of the Gaps logic, however, when admitting Homo-Sapiens as a special creation, and in a few other places. Overall, an exciting and progressive treatment of an important issue from a beautiful thinker and man.