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ISBN:0826460526
Author: Demetrius Williams
ISBN13: 978-0826460523
Title: Enemies of the Cross of Christ: The Terminology of the Cross and Conflict in Philippians (The Library of New Testament Studies)
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Language: English
Category: Bible Study and Reference
Publisher: Sheffield Academic Press (November 15, 2002)
Pages: 298

Enemies of the Cross of Christ: The Terminology of the Cross and Conflict in Philippians (The Library of New Testament Studies) by Demetrius Williams



library of new testament studies. ENEMIES OF THE CROSS OF CHRIST The Terminology of the Cross and Conflict in Philippians. Demetrius k. williams. Journal for the study of the new testament supplement series. Paul utilizes cross terminology in a deliberative argument to encourage the Philippians to follow an advantageous course of action for the future in the face of opposition and conflict. Paul himself introduces the terminology of the cross as a rhetorical strategy to exhort the Philippians, on the one hand, to unity amid suffering (ch. 2) and, on the other, to polarize his competitor's position from his own (ch.

Enemies of the Cross' employs classical rhetorical analysis to examine how Paul structures a deliberative argument using his understanding of the 'cross of Christ'. His goals are to guide/advise the Philippian community through internal and external strife (ch. 2), combat his opponents (c. ), and develop his notion of the eschatological community (3:18-21). Williams proposes that while Paul has a 'theology of the death of Jesus', of which cross terminology is one of several aspects, this terminology is used almost exclusively in l contexts

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Enemies of the Cross' employs classical rhetorical analysis to examine how Paul structures a deliberative argument using his understanding of the 'cross of Christ'.

The cross was the climax of Christ’s obedience. It is as though all his obedience was summed up in those final hours of final testing. No obedience compared to the obedience of staying on the cross in fulfillment of his Father’s will. Therefore it is a great sadness when militant Islam calls all Muslims everywhere to fight the cross. But it is not new. Acts 9:1 said that Paul was breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, and Jesus said that the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God (John 16:2). It is breathtaking to read the transcripts of Al-Qaida tapes giving thanks to God for the successes of their killing. My greatest longing in response to this enmity is that Christians walk in the way of the cross. Yes, militant Islam is big and threatening

In calling the Philippians to pursue Christ and live cross-centered lives, Paul lifted up his own imitation of the Savior as a model for all to follow (Phil. Understanding that Christian living combines proposition and practice, the Apostle knew his original readers would become conformed to Jesus’ image if they knew what to believe and had tangible behavior to emulate.

Weymouth New Testament For there are many whom I have often described to you, and I now even with tears describe them, as being enemies to the Cross of Christ. Here again (as in the application of the epithet "dogs" in Philippians 3:2 ) St. Paul seems to retort on those whom he rebuked a name which they may probably have given to their opponents. The Judaising tenets were, indeed, in a true sense, an enmity to that cross, which was "to the Jews a stumbling-block," because, as St. Paul shows at large in the Galatian and Roman Epistles, they trenched upon faith in the all-sufficient atonement, and so (as he expresses it with startling emphasis) made Christ to "be dead in vain.

Enemies of the cross diminish its value by emphasizing human worth or merit in addition to what Christ did on the cross. They lift up fallen man and bring down the holy God, thus shortening the mighty gulf that God did span at Calvary. One prominent enemy of the cross says, If Christ died for me, I must be of infinite value in God’s sight (Robert Schuller, Self-Esteem: The New Reformation, p. 74). This man redefines our sinfulness our rebellion is a reaction, not our nature. It is mentioned in every book of the New Testament except Galatians, which deals with a particular doctrinal matter, and the short books of Philemon and 2 & 3 John. While there may be debate over the particulars, there is no debate over the certainty of His bodily return. Just as He promised that He came the first time to die for our sins and kept His word, so He promised to return.

'Enemies of the Cross' employs classical rhetorical analysis to examine how Paul structures a deliberative argument using his understanding of the 'cross of Christ'. His goals are to guide/advise the Philippian community through internal and external strife (ch. 2), combat his opponents (ch.3), and develop his notion of the eschatological community (3:18-21). Williams proposes that while Paul has a 'theology of the death of Jesus', of which cross terminology is one of several aspects, this terminology is used almost exclusively in polemical/conflictual contexts. Hence Paul appears to be using 'cross of Christ' not so much as a doctrine but rather as a rhetorical tool, in a context of conflict and strife, to support his understanding of eschatology, apostolic service, the nature of Christian existence, and community among the saints.